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Post Rock Sound - Delay. Pre or Post?
Old 6th February 2012
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Post Rock Sound - Delay. Pre or Post?

What do you guys usually do? I looked for this topic and haven't found much about it at all on the forums, and it is kind of an opinionated subject.

So when you record guitars that are laden with delay (old U2, Explosions in the Sky etc.), do you do the delay pre or post recording? In other words, pedals or plugins / rack units?
Old 6th February 2012
  #2
Gear Nut
 

Delay is such a huge part of the post-rock sound that it never even occurred to me to try to record guitars minus their usual delay with the intention of adding it later. That'd be like recording a death metal band with their amps on the clean channel and planning on distorting them later - the performance would suffer unbearably. Or so I'd imagine.

If you're thinking of a crazy reamp scheme, that's one thing, but if you're talking about recording the guitar as usual but with its delay(s) turned off then adding them later, I just can't see that working well.
Old 6th February 2012
  #3
Pre / in front of amp for a dirtier, more organic sound.

Post / effects loop for a cleaner, more dimensional sound.
Old 6th February 2012
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
thegatsby's Avatar
I used to play in a band like this.
The engineer where we recorded MADE us not use our delay pedals and told us he would do it in the mix. After doing a few records with him he changed his mind though.
MY personally feeling is that however the band plays, rehearses, etc should be the way it is recorded. And it also depends on the part. Sometimes post effects is better, like reverb etc. If its part of the song like a delay I would record with it.
You can always lay down a dry guitar track over top the delay, ambience track.
Example here.
The Bitter Life Typecast
Old 6th February 2012
  #5
Here for the gear
 
mnentwich's Avatar
 

Totally agree.

I would never record without the effects, if the band is used to play like that. The performance would suffer a LOT!

You can take the DI signal without the delay/FX if something goes wrong, so you can reamp it later. I always do it that way, but i can't remember using it ever. It's just a backup.
Old 6th February 2012
  #6
I always used a z vex super hard on going into any good analog delay going into a cranked amp for the smearing short delay stuff. For slower delays, I'd do it post.

This is how I do all of my delays with The Ascent of Everest. Pretty good results I think.
Old 6th February 2012
  #7
Lives for gear
 
Mertmo's Avatar
 

I would go mostly PRE. But I would also attempt to identify a few spots on the
record that would benefit from the ability to do some different panning, etc...
And set those few spots up to be done POST. Because it can be a very powerful
effect. It's not where I would want to start from on every tune by any stretch,
but if I could get away with it in a couple spots, I feel it would add a nice
variation to the "menu" of sounds on the record.

Alternate method, which would essentially accomplish both, would be to set up
a multi-amp scenario where the delayed signals are being fed discreetly to
separate amps with their own mics/tracks.

To sum up, I wouldn't do it strictly one way or the other, but I would definitely
lean more heavily on PRE.
Old 6th February 2012
  #8
Gear Addict
 
Mike Douaire's Avatar
 

Pedals.

I get a better performance out of myself and others when we use our personal rigs.

You can always grab a DI signal before going into the pedalboard, reamp later, add effects later and then A/B the two, or blend.

I agree performance suffers without the tools of the trade.
Old 6th February 2012
  #9
Quote:
Pedals.

I get a better performance out of myself and others when we use our personal rigs.

You can always grab a DI signal before going into the pedalboard, reamp later, add effects later and then A/B the two, or blend.

I agree performance suffers without the tools of the trade.
+1

Just back off on any reverb you're using - guitarists tend to swamp their guitar in it and then when you compress the guitars, the reverb is more audible which just leads to a horrible mush.
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