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What FTP service do you use?
Old 19th September 2011
  #1
Moderator
 
James Lugo's Avatar
 

What FTP service do you use?

I'm looking at working much more online now and looking into how to receive song tracks. What are you guys using? I'm looking for something simple and effective. Something that can handle large files; 30 to 50 tracks at varied sample rates.
Old 19th September 2011
  #2
Lives for gear
My company at the day job has switched to Google mail. We send CAD files around all the time. A lot of the folks I work with like PCB fab shops have gone away from FTP sites now that there are folks supporting large email attachments. The other thing some are using are hosted drop boxes.
Old 19th September 2011
  #3
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Sk106's Avatar
 

Got my own FTP set up on a local machine, an older cheap machine that isn't used for anything else than FTP. It's not even on, unless I'm specifically expecting someone to send files to it or get files from it. So, script kiddies out there won't get much of an opportunity to manipulate it.

The only thing it needs is a reasonably fast connection and USB port (to get the stuff over to another computer via USB stick). On the 30 Mbps connection I use, transferring 1 gb over the internet takes ~5 minutes. A zipped up 30 track mix is anywhere between 0,5-1 gb. The FTP shares internet connection with other computers (via a switch) so what I pay to have internet ($16/month) isn't just for the FTP thing. Make sure that whoever is the sender compresses his files. Audiofiles compress really well, and doing so could decrease the amount of data to transfer by 65%.

With an online FTP service, the sender sends the stuff to an online account, where you in turn must download it from. Same way if you're sending stuff, gotta upload it to the online account before the receiver can get to it. That's a slight complicating thing. But one benefit is that the online FTP is on 24/7, and local FTPs shouldn't be. Another plus is you won't have to set a local machine up, and you won't have to worry about the local machine getting screwed with.

I'm seeing less FTP use than before, seems to be going down. Seems many people think FTP is 'too complicated' - even though they can use their browser to do it directly. People use all kinds of workarounds (which in the end amounts to being more complicated than FTP). The alternative I've seen increase the most, is web based file sending services. It means you'd zip up all the stuff into one compressed file, go to a web page, upload that file (max file size about 2 gb) and it sends an email to the receiver when it's ready for download. Once it's downloaded, the service deletes it, and it can't be downloaded by anyone who doesn't have the right ID number and the service will only host the file for a few days before it's deleted.
Old 19th September 2011
  #4
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
James - I'm using HostRocket.com I set up individual ftp accounts for all my clients so they have privacy, and no one client can access another clients files. Works like a charm, and keeps things organized, and clients feeling "safe and secure".
Old 19th September 2011
  #5
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jaddie's Avatar
 

I get web hosting from Hostmonster.com, it's cheap, and you can host as many domains/web sites as you want, unlimited email, bandwidth, etc. FTP is part of the deal.

Because the concept of FTP with an FTP client and server is confusing to many people, I use the advantage of web hosting and do it this way: I FTP the file to a directory on the server called "download", then put a link to the file on a very simple web page that includes instructions on how to download the link (right-click, save-as). The page is something like www.<domain>.com/download.html. I email the URL to whoever needs the file. The basic page has only a few lines on it, and I edit it as needed to link to a new file. Hostmonster also lets you password protect a directory, so there's your client login control too. I regularly pass around some very large files, as there is no file size limit at all, and no cost (other than their annual fee). I can even archive some of the files on the server, if necessary.

I realize if you've never built a web page, this might seem complicated, but it's really not difficult, just different. I also love having my own web server, great for full control of emails for example, and there are tons of other things you can do.
Old 19th September 2011
  #6
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Silvertone's Avatar
I tell everyone to check with whoever you have hosting your website. Mine provides a free secure ftp site to Silvertone as part of their service... most do. It means a client must have an ftp program such as Fetch or Cyberduck but there are plent of "free" programs on the web (Cyberduck being one of them).

So you guys may be paying for something that you are already paying for!

It's worth looking into.

Good luck.
Old 19th September 2011
  #7
Gear Addict
 

You need to be careful with any company that offers "unlimited" web hosting packages. If you read their TOS, they strictly forbid file sharing / hosting in most cases. A lot of them will also prohibit certain file types such as MP3/WAV audio files. I've been in the hosting industry for almost 7 years now, so I've seen countless people fall into the "unlimited" trap.

Personally, up until recently, I had 107 servers at Softlayer. After I shut that company down, I've just got one single "Premium VPS" with BurstNET that I manage myself.

If it's something critical, I'd say just pick up a VPS and manage it yourself. With a VPS, you can do what you want provided it's legal. You can get them dirt cheap at BurstNET starting at about $6/month. Sure, they won't be the fastest things ever compared to a company like Linode where quality is the first priority, but they'll do the job and you can be the administrator to the server.
Old 19th September 2011
  #8
Gear Maniac
 
Cerpintaxt's Avatar
 

ive been using website hosting, like rapidshare and sendspace. seems to work fine and has always been quick and problem free
Old 19th September 2011
  #9
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Michael E's Avatar
https://www.dropbox.com/ works great. (Yeah, It's a referral link. Your free registration will give me 250 mb extra space.)

(I'm in graphic design industry, not in music, but we have to handle a large numbers of heavy photoshop files and etc.)

2 Gb is for free, so try it.
Old 19th September 2011
  #10
Gear Nut
 
Geoffrey A's Avatar
 

I have a paid account at yousendit.com, never a problem. I also do a lot of exchanging of files via Fetch with one studio in NY.
Old 19th September 2011
  #11
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Halloween's Avatar
If I were you I would either rent a server, or buy a in house server. I might lean more toward renting a server, you can pay a yearly fee an you have 24/7 tech support. No reason to use someone else when you can cut out the middle man, decrease your cost and at the same time customize your data speeds as well as capacity. Not to mention at any time if you decide to up the capacity or speeds, you will have that option, best of luck and I have all intentions of using your service in the future, I've been checking it out for some time.
Old 19th September 2011
  #12
Gear Guru
 
UnderTow's Avatar
www.wetransfer.com

Free. Files up to 2GB. Faster than anything you could ever have locally. No hassle. Everybody understands how it works.

Alistair
Old 19th September 2011
  #13
Sendspace.com account, Dropbox, and web hosted ftp here.
Old 19th September 2011
  #14
Gear Addict
 

Dropbox has been working well for me lately
Old 19th September 2011
  #15
The best, and most secure, way to do FTP is to have a separate computer with Linux on it running FTP. That way you are not at the mercy of an outside provider, and the cost (besides building the box) is basically 0.

You can setup your own users/groups, provide access limitations, and get to the FTP from anywhere in the world, as long as you have a static IP on your connection.

The truly best way is to build two linux boxes and have one as the firewall/router for your network running netfilter with iptables and tc traffic shaping. That way you can accurately route your traffic over your LAN.
Old 20th September 2011
  #16
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTow View Post
www.wetransfer.com

Free. Files up to 2GB. Faster than anything you could ever have locally. No hassle. Everybody understands how it works.

Alistair
Using it more and more here. Simple, quick and clients dig it.
Old 20th September 2011
  #17
Deleted User
Guest
Has anyone checked out
Gobbler yet? Steven Slate appears to endorse it

Windows version coming soon as well
Old 20th September 2011
  #18
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bigbone's Avatar
 

ME.com work great for me
Old 20th September 2011
  #19
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael E View Post
https://www.dropbox.com/ works great. (Yeah, It's a referral link. Your free registration will give me 250 mb extra space.)

(I'm in graphic design industry, not in music, but we have to handle a large numbers of heavy photoshop files and etc.)

2 Gb is for free, so try it.
Yup! I got 12 gigs in mine and its awesome! :D
Old 20th September 2011
  #20
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by kittonian View Post
The best, and most secure, way to do FTP is to have a separate computer with Linux on it running FTP. That way you are not at the mercy of an outside provider, and the cost (besides building the box) is basically 0.

You can setup your own users/groups, provide access limitations, and get to the FTP from anywhere in the world, as long as you have a static IP on your connection.

The truly best way is to build two linux boxes and have one as the firewall/router for your network running netfilter with iptables and tc traffic shaping. That way you can accurately route your traffic over your LAN.
"yo, I don't know what the f*&^ you just said, but you touched a brotha's heart......."

LOL
Old 20th September 2011
  #21
Gear Addict
 
Mr. Wilson's Avatar
 

We use a combo of Digidelivery and the new incarnation Aspera, a private FTP sever and Dropbox. It all depends on file/session size, the client and speed. Digi/Aspera and the FTP with large files... Dropbox for quick and small stuff. Your pipe up/down is a huge factor. I have Verizon FIOS so I'm fast up to a fast fiber down but if the receiver has a small pipe and/or heavy traffic the speed varies dramatically. One must learn to mange bandwidth.
Old 20th September 2011
  #22
Lives for gear
 
Sofa King's Avatar
 

Dropbox is not perfect, but its the best solution Ive found so far..
best of luck, let us know what you come up with.
Old 20th September 2011
  #23
Gear Nut
 

I often receive files via yousendit.com, and usually send them via Apple's mobile me (me.com). Both work for me, but to receive lots of tracks you probably need something more robust.
Old 20th September 2011
  #24
I use box.net
I like it a lot....Things get tricky when trying to share big sessions though.
Anything over 2 gigs and you're kind of focked.
Old 20th September 2011
  #25
A simple pc connected to the internet and setup as FTP box.
Make sure it mirrors it content to a non shared disk and then wipes the content of the FTP box. Or put some decent password on it so clients feel secure.

Sending in a DVD by Mail never hurt anyone...
Old 20th September 2011
  #26
Gear Addict
 

+1 Dropbox, It’s very easy to share a folder with a customer, and you can share several folders with several customers. Synchronization is very transparent on a Mac (i haven’t tried on a PC).
I’ve been using iDisk a couple of years, but lately Dropbox works better.
Old 20th September 2011
  #27
Moderator
 
James Lugo's Avatar
 

Thanks for the replies I will start looking into the suggestions. I have yousendit but I'm looking for something I can send more the 2gb.
Old 20th September 2011
  #28
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kittonian View Post
The best, and most secure, way to do FTP is to have a separate computer with Linux on it running FTP. That way you are not at the mercy of an outside provider, and the cost (besides building the box) is basically 0.

You can setup your own users/groups, provide access limitations, and get to the FTP from anywhere in the world, as long as you have a static IP on your connection.

The truly best way is to build two linux boxes and have one as the firewall/router for your network running netfilter with iptables and tc traffic shaping. That way you can accurately route your traffic over your LAN.
I'd strongly advise against this.
Unless you REALLY know what you do.

And if you knew, you'd know that the proper way to do it would be having the ftpd in a DMZ. Maybe even implement a screened subnet architecture.
Plus additional measures on the bastion host. Some of them are listed here:

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/4281827-post6.html

BTW, what is 'tc traffic shaping'? You speaking about TCP?
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