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Help needed with approaching studio/engineers Dynamic Microphones
Old 6th September 2011
  #1
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Help needed with approaching studio/engineers

Hey all!

I'm pretty new to the community (posting at least, been reading for several months now), my name is Chris and I live in the Capitol Region of New York.

This seems like the right forum to post, if its not I do apologize. I have searched for answers but alas, I haven't found a decent one. Any advice should be helpful folks!

So here's the story, as stated I'm new to this section of the music business, fresh out of College with a degree in Music Composition and realized production is what I really want to do (recording, producing, mixing, etc.). I finally feel as if I am fluent enough in Analog gear, Pro Tools, setting up sessions (physically and in Pro Tools) and troubleshooting to get into a studio (where of course I'll have my ass handed to me, a challenge I will gleefully accept) and get some type of experience that could land me a paid job. I'm not so ignorant to think I could not pay my dues, so I was looking to offer my services to local studios and have even consider paying for time (instead of going to schooling route again, even an SAE or Recording Connection path) in order to get my feet soaked.

So here's the question; If you got a call, email or visit from a random person you've never met asking for your time, knowledge, and studio space (even though I'm offering a free service, and possibly offering compensation for your time) what would you want to know? What kind resume should I put together?
In the music business, no matter who it is I'd rather not piss anyone off and seem ignorant. I am just a person who wants to make music his living, I am dedicated, focused, a quick learner and I don't mind putting in any amount of time necessary to succeed, I'd just like to expedite it by learning from people who've already done what I'd like to do, and hopefully not make too many mistakes!

Also, I believe it is noteworthy to mention that I have not been able to do much mixing, as most bands are pretty territorial over their work, however I have found a band with free multi-tracks so I've been practicing, some works you can find here; Jajamon's sounds on SoundCloud - Create, record and share your sounds for free. They aren't amazing, but it's my first attempt mixing someone's music.

Any advice is welcome, please help me out if you can! Please feel free to ask questions too.

Chris
Old 7th September 2011
  #2
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Tarekith's Avatar
Since you're fresh out of school without any real experience, I'm not sure you even can put a resume together, can you? The last thing a studio owner is going to want to see on a resume is all the things you learned in school IMO. I'd call them up directly and ask them this question. Express what you told us, and ask them for advice on how to get into the field or work for them.

Their time is valuable, so keep it short, polite, humble and if they say no, take that and move on as nicely as possible.
Old 7th September 2011
  #3
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jajamon View Post
If you got a call, email or visit from a random person you've never met asking for your time, knowledge, and studio space (even though I'm offering a free service, and possibly offering compensation for your time) what would you want to know? What kind resume should I put together?
An absolutely stunning showreel or website that has examples of your work in all different types of music. You can pretty much pass on yet another Metalica sound-alike, particularly one that seems to prefer one key.

More importantly, you need to show an ability for business acquisition - i.e. an ability to get paying customers through the studio door.

There are no salaried positions in studios, but many good working partnerships with engineers and arrangers who can pull the hot chestnuts out of the fire and are of mutual benefit for the studio.

Please remember that a studio is just a tool, just like any other business tool. It is a tool that is getting used less and less and is therefore not a place where you are going to find a fruitful career with any ease. Look at it like a supplier of building or farming machinery.

You would not go to your local John Deere franchise to find work as a brick layer or an architect. You wouldn't even go there to find work as a digger or loader driver.

Bands, arrangers, composers, agencies, producers and of course musicians hire engineers, not studios - so talk to them first!
Old 10th September 2011
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jajamon View Post
I was looking to offer my services to local studios and have even consider paying for time (instead of going to schooling route again, even an SAE or Recording Connection path) in order to get my feet soaked.

So here's the question; If you got a call, email or visit from a random person you've never met asking for your time, knowledge, and studio space (even though I'm offering a free service, and possibly offering compensation for your time) what would you want to know? What kind resume should I put together?
In the music business, no matter who it is I'd rather not piss anyone off and seem ignorant. I am just a person who wants to make music his living, I am dedicated, focused, a quick learner and I don't mind putting in any amount of time necessary to succeed, I'd just like to expedite it by learning from people who've already done what I'd like to do, and hopefully not make too many mistakes!
Sorry am I hearing that you (1) want to book time in a studio to play with their gear, or that you (2) want to do a work experience where they give you their clients and you pay for the time on top of what the clients pay?

(1): Just ring up and say "I want to book the studio" they'll treat you like any other.
(2): Yeah, right. Why would the studio want to place their image and reputation in the hands of somebody who is so rubbish that they need to pay to work? Sorry but no matter how you put it that is the only way it will come across to a business minded person.
Old 10th September 2011
  #5
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Quote:
So here's the question; If you got a call, email or visit from a random person you've never met asking for your time, knowledge, and studio space (even though I'm offering a free service, and possibly offering compensation for your time) what would you want to know? What kind resume should I put together?
All the best music you've done lately. I don't want to see a piece of paper, I want to hear well produced demos you've done. I don't think you'll get very far without one, unless you want to be the janitor at a recording studio.
Old 10th September 2011
  #6
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by therealbigd View Post
Sorry am I hearing that you (1) want to book time in a studio to play with their gear, or that you
(1): Just ring up and say "I want to book the studio" they'll treat you like any other.
Booking studio time is useless, I already have that and I have taken it as far as I can go.

Quote:
Originally Posted by therealbigd View Post
(2) want to do a work experience where they give you their clients and you pay for the time on top of what the clients pay?
(2): Yeah, right. Why would the studio want to place their image and reputation in the hands of somebody who is so rubbish that they need to pay to work? Sorry but no matter how you put it that is the only way it will come across to a business minded person.
And where did you read I'd pay to work? I said compensate for time, such as a lesson, perhaps I should have specified. And you're telling me a business minded person would turn down money (you know, that thing you work for to pay bills) from someone who is knowledgeable but doesn't have experience to help you out in your studio (making your job easier) just to teach him what you do day to day? I'm pretty sure if you're an engineer with interns you deal with the same hassle (which you may not even be getting paid for). So you're saying engineers with interns aren't business minded?
I also said nothing about being paid by studio and client, that's as absurd as your attack.
These 2 points are not only contradictory, but a completely useless attack on me, whom you do not know.

@ Tarekith,
Thank you, your advice has been extremely helpful, and so far is going well.

@ The Byre,
Unfortunately I do not have any gear available to me for public use, so going straight to artists means nothing since I have no body of work, I am at a catch-22, I cannot produce work because I can't get work. =( However, your John Deere metaphor has really made me think of a new approach, thank you.

@ Liquid360,
As already said, my demos are a catch-22. Can't really produce a demo without someone taking a chance on me, and nobody will take a chance on someone without having some glimpse of their work...
Old 11th September 2011
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jajamon View Post
And where did you read I'd pay to work? I said compensate for time, such as a lesson, perhaps I should have specified. I also said nothing about being paid by studio and client, that's as absurd as your attack.
These 2 points are not only contradictory, but a completely useless attack on me, whom you do not know.
That's why I asked.

I did ask.

Quote:
And you're telling me a business minded person would turn down money (you know, that thing you work for to pay bills)
Yes, I'm quite familiar with what money is. I have a good amount of it from working in this trade, obviously something which you can't claim so I don't know where you got your high horse from but the guy ripped you off.

Quote:
from someone who is knowledgeable but doesn't have experience to help you out in your studio (making your job easier) just to teach him what you do day to day? I'm pretty sure if you're an engineer with interns you deal with the same hassle (which you may not even be getting paid for). So you're saying engineers with interns aren't business minded?
You've got to look at how across, not at how you mean it. I responded based on how it came across, just what people who read your emails will do. If you don't like honest advice, don't ask for it, it's never a good idea.

I can see where you're coming from but studios aren't charities and they need to get on with the job, not spend the time teaching new guys. The majority of studio interns are not there to (primarily) learn, they're there to work and learn on the way. Most are already half decent engineers and competent Pro Tools operators before they're allowed to sit in their first session as an intern, because if you're going to have an extra body in the studio it needs to be a body that can contribute.

For sure you can say "I have the knowledge" but do you? And how do you back it up?

I would never trust somebody claiming they had enough knowledge to work in a professional recording environment if they were asking to pay me to give them an internship.

The majority of studio interns that I know are already decent studio engineers with studio experience and small-time credits.

If I were you, I'd start hanging out in venues, watching bands and asking them to come record at a 'preferential rate as you like their music', get your experience up and then go asking for an internship, as in return for them employing you (as an intern), you can actually offer them a valuable service. Simply asking them to help you in return for cash may seem like a financially good deal, but it isn't. A studio's cash comes from it's reputation so offering great staff is more important than a few extra bucks from helping some dude out.
Old 11th September 2011
  #8
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The way I see it, you have two options.

1) Create your own home studio and make some demos. This is the the best way to learn in my opinion.

2) Do an unpaid internship at a major studio. They will beat the hell out of you, but you will learn... You'll clean the toilets and make coffee etc, but they let you sit in if they like you. Saying you worked at "Super Studio XYZ" for a year is a great thing to have on your resume.

When I first started out, I did both.
Old 11th September 2011
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by therealbigd View Post
If I were you, I'd start hanging out in venues, watching bands and asking them to come record at a 'preferential rate as you like their music', get your experience up and then go asking for an internship, as in return for them employing you (as an intern), you can actually offer them a valuable service. Simply asking them to help you in return for cash may seem like a financially good deal, but it isn't. A studio's cash comes from it's reputation so offering great staff is more important than a few extra bucks from helping some dude out.
Now that's advice and not an attack. I can clearly see you're opinion instead of being told I'm rubbish.

Also, I did not properly mention it, I have been working in an home studio that is completely analog. I have been helpful, and I have had some decent hours put into recording, the issue is that it is not my studio and I cannot bring random people in, hence the reason I would like to work in a studio that has a real flow of projects.
I feel like I know Pro Tools because I have PT8LE w/ a Digi 003, have read numerous manuals, articles, interviews and seen many instructional videos, I don't spend too much time wondering where to find something I want.

As far as your talking about recording for preferential rates; where would I do such a thing? I own an SM58 as far as my mic collection is concerned. (Before you think I'm on a high horse this is a serious question, with no studio space and no microphones, how do you suggest getting a preferential rate?)

I'm not saying I'm amazing by any means, but this thread was posted because I wanted to know how to approach studios and engineers looking for work. I want to know what an engineer is looking for.

So specifically @ therealbigd (all others welcome to comment of course) if I were to put the following on my resume, what would you say?

A 15 track demo album mixed with Pro Tools 8LE (tracked elsewhere) and hours logged in a full analog studio w/ a self tracked and mixed analog demo? Would that be enough for you to give me a chance?
Old 11th September 2011
  #10
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Tarekith's Avatar
Honestly, I think you're going to have to go at this based on a personal connection and not just experience. You're competing with thousands of other people coming out of "recording schools" every year, and quite honestly, most will probably have more experience than you're listing. Given how few studios these days are looking to hire, and how most probably get dozens of resumes a week as it is, you need to find a way other than just a resume to get yourself noticed.

That's one reason I suggested calling different studios. Take the initiative, make a personal connection, and avoid being just another faceless name on a resume.
Old 16th September 2011
  #11
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Got one!

Hey, I just wanted to update those who posted, I got an internship, which may lead to a second!

Super exciting, I just googled local studios, called around, got an interview and now I'm working with two engineers and the owner is gonna see if he can help me get some more work at a larger studio.

Thanks a bunch, for anyone else reading this, just call 'em up (though make sure to call as many as possible cuz I called 10 different places!)

-Ja
Old 18th September 2011
  #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jajamon View Post
Hey, I just wanted to update those who posted, I got an internship, which may lead to a second!

Super exciting, I just googled local studios, called around, got an interview and now I'm working with two engineers and the owner is gonna see if he can help me get some more work at a larger studio.

Thanks a bunch, for anyone else reading this, just call 'em up (though make sure to call as many as possible cuz I called 10 different places!)

-Ja
I think I had a database of 50 or more when I was first looking for work, so I know what you mean!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquid360 View Post
All the best music you've done lately. I don't want to see a piece of paper, I want to hear well produced demos you've done. I don't think you'll get very far without one, unless you want to be the janitor at a recording studio.
Irrelevant to the OP, but anyone looking for work at a studio as an assistant (and very rarely will a studio take someone who isn't already a working engineer as a house engineer) is not going to be interested in your showreel - they want to make sure you're going to plug microphones in and take recalls well, get the coffees right...you're not going to be recording or mixing, you're going to be assisting. You've got time to learn the rest
Old 18th September 2011
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Irrelevant to the OP, but anyone looking for work at a studio as an assistant (and very rarely will a studio take someone who isn't already a working engineer as a house engineer) is not going to be interested in your showreel - they want to make sure you're going to plug microphones in and take recalls well, get the coffees right...you're not going to be recording or mixing, you're going to be assisting. You've got time to learn the rest
Agree with that.

I'm not so hot on the studio thing any more but I run a small local crew (we generally get sub-hired by bigger locals companies to do the big arena shows / festivals etc), I get loads of CVs telling me about all the 'tours' they've done as FOH (basically meaning band, van, small clubs) or lighting design for theatre, but no mention of box pushing.

Local crew, be honest... is box pushing, cable running, light hanging, and nothing more advanced. I couldn't care less how many times you've done sound 'on tour' in some 200 capacity pub conversion, if you're not strong enough to push a mains transformer up a lorry ramp, you're useless to me.

This is, I expect, the same across the board. The studio are only interested in your traits which are ACTUALLY useful to them.
Old 18th October 2011
  #14
Gear Nut
 

Jajamon how is the internship going. I am in the same boat you were in before you got your internship. Just cold calling the studios did the trick?
Old 20th October 2011
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dickyrader View Post
Jajamon how is the internship going. I am in the same boat you were in before you got your internship. Just cold calling the studios did the trick?
Hey man, my internship is going well. 4 days a week, 3 hour sessions each (I'd like to do more, but I have a full time job which kinda gets in the way ). Its not the busiest studio, and mostly hip hop/rap but I am learning and practicing Pro Tools everyday.

Cold calling did the trick, I googled all the studios I could find and called them all. I would say though if you have the time you should go in and talk to someone. Had I not had a full time job limiting my availability, I think going in would have landed me a busier studio. Plus then you'd actually get to see the operation and I've always felt I get better results in person.

Good luck man, just be persistent. And I'll tell you what, if you know anyone looking to record, bringing business to a studio definitely looks good.
Old 20th October 2011
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jajamon View Post
Hey man, my internship is going well. 4 days a week, 3 hour sessions each (I'd like to do more, but I have a full time job which kinda gets in the way ). Its not the busiest studio, and mostly hip hop/rap but I am learning and practicing Pro Tools everyday.

Cold calling did the trick, I googled all the studios I could find and called them all. I would say though if you have the time you should go in and talk to someone. Had I not had a full time job limiting my availability, I think going in would have landed me a busier studio. Plus then you'd actually get to see the operation and I've always felt I get better results in person.

Good luck man, just be persistent. And I'll tell you what, if you know anyone looking to record, bringing business to a studio definitely looks good.
As someone who sometimes has to field these sorts of "cold drop ins", I'd say it's not a good idea - what makes you think a busy studio manager has the time to drop everything to talk to a potential intern? Generally you'll hand over your CV and be sent politely on your way, kind of a waste of a trip really - at a bad (ie busy time) you'll be shooed away!
Old 20th October 2011
  #17
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Turning up is not good plan unless you catch them on a quiet moment when everyone is bored.

I don't work in studios anymore but random kids still turn up to the venues and ask to come speak to us, security just send them through, and we're there trying to hang a 2 ton point and some random guy is telling you he wants a job.

That thoroughly annoys you as it's a distraction and it's both dangerous and utterly unhelpful. If you take a CV at all it'll be noted at the top with "Thrush". (Thrush, for the uneducated, is an irritating c....t), to serve a reminder that they're not for hiring. If anything you'll just pin up their desperately poor CV on the wall of the crew room for bored people to laugh at.

I would go with an email. This business is such that if you catch somebody in the middle of something they might well just bark at you and not even consider you because their first impression of you was the person who interrupted them when they were doing something important. People can deal with e-mails in their spare time when they're not in the middle of something.

If you want to be a bit sneaky, subject it "Studio Enquiry", you're not lying but they're far more likely to read it than if you subject it "Internship Enquiry".
Old 20th October 2011
  #18
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Cb Media's Avatar
helpful thread, thanks to all contributors!

I find it difficult to maintain a regular income and still be eligible to fulfill the internship requirements for most good facilities. I have the priority of putting food on my table and keeping a roof over my head, not providing free labor for potentially months before I am not offered a job or am offered a job that will not pay me enough without extreme amounts of hustle for anther persons company and reputation.

I see how well it works for someone who already owns a studio or is solidified in the business... but it's not a viable option (from my perspective) for a self-starter with a lifestyle to maintain and a full time job in a different professional area, let alone someone with a wife and children or family to support. It's difficult enough to get a BS job as a waiter/waitress or a general customer service rep for a large commercial conglomerate, or anywhere else for that matter, but it's much tougher to iron out a steady path in any aspect of the entertainment industry without a great expectation of loss and very little payback. (this would be the optimistic view!)

The strength for me has been in networking my own company with my own efforts to people in the business as well as any and every potential local musical endeavor possible (live sound, recording, mixing, production, sound to picture, sound design, acoustics etc....). I do tons of work for free to inspire confidence and security in my clients while also building connections, building the reputation of my own company, and eventually setting myself up to be a simple and successful operation that can be run from a well built home studio, and expanded as my net worth see's fit, and no sooner.

If I don't make it, i still have something to show for it as well as money well invested in gear that will hold it's value, a quality studio to produce my own music, a great network of creative people, and lots of fun memorable experiences to keep me happy in elder years... sounds like a win-win to me
Old 20th October 2011
  #19
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Hey all again,

@ Psycho and bigd, good, understandable advice.

Maybe I should clarify what I meant by show up; simply walk into the studio (most of which around here seem to have receptionists) and tell them you're inquiring about an assistantship/internship, and would like to set up a meeting, as if you were setting up studio time. Be polite and make sure they know you'll stay still and be quiet until they have a moment. Or if they are tracking, ask when you can come back.
Of course as bigd said, some'll just say they aren't going to hire you on the spot or write a reminder on your CV that they hate you. Which in my mind, if the engineer's a big enough prick to decide that a guy isn't worth hiring, because he shows initiative and passion by showing up face to face, I personally wouldn't want to work with him anyway.

On top of that, the emails I did have to send out, only half replied. Just emailing gives the studio an easy out, and if you're like me, and you wanna make this a career, an email simply isn't good enough.

I understand that it is annoying, and that most interns suck. This is in no way an attack on either of you, or engineers in general. However, to the engineers, you were there at one point too. You knew starting this career that interns would be knocking, so you have to deal with them. Maybe dedicate a part of your website to potential interns, eliminate those calls by posting "Looking for interns," or "no internships available at this time." All I know is that a bunch of the guys I called were nice, and mostly helpful, giving tips and telling me what other studios to call. Some were dicks.

I cold called, pushed, and found a pretty decent opportunity. If you'd rather be polite and passive, email. Write a thousand pages about how you're the best intern. I'm sure it works for some, but I needed a more aggressive approach due to my lack of experience.

And by the way my internship, though unpaid for now, isn't taking out garbages and making coffee. Within the first week I was doing edits, sitting in on sessions, helping make creative decisions, etc. So as far as I'm concerned, if any of the helpful engineers thought I was a dick and didn't give me a shot cuz I cold called, they passed up a very helpful, dedicated, knowledgeable intern.
Old 20th October 2011
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jajamon View Post
Maybe I should clarify what I meant by show up; simply walk into the studio (most of which around here seem to have receptionists) and tell them you're inquiring about an assistantship/internship, and would like to set up a meeting, as if you were setting up studio time. Be polite and make sure they know you'll stay still and be quiet until they have a moment. Or if they are tracking, ask when you can come back.
Of course as bigd said, some'll just say they aren't going to hire you on the spot or write a reminder on your CV that they hate you. Which in my mind, if the engineer's a big enough prick to decide that a guy isn't worth hiring, because he shows initiative and passion by showing up face to face, I personally wouldn't want to work with him anyway.
Right well that seems to be the difference, the studios you come across have receptions. If it has a reception, fine. Most studios round here, minus the big multi-studio facilities, don't. The buzzer on the door feeds the control room and the only people in the building are either musicians or producer / engineer / assistant. Hence, the only people who should knock on the door, are people who're asked to, or the pizza delivery bloke.

Quote:
On top of that, the emails I did have to send out, only half replied. Just emailing gives the studio an easy out, and if you're like me, and you wanna make this a career, an email simply isn't good enough.
If you want to make a career, an e-mail isn't good enough. Can you quantify that?

Yes, an e-mail is an easy way out. But take it from me, the person who doesn't answer the e-mail is the same person who answers the phone with "we don't have any internships".

If you get off over hearing a voice rather than hearing nothing at all well then I guess phoning works. But equally you run more risk of catching somebody at a bad time and setting a bad first impression.

Quote:
I understand that it is annoying, and that most interns suck.
Most interns suck. Can you quantify that too?

So it's not an attack on engineers, just interns.

Cool. For an intern.
Old 20th October 2011
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by therealbigd View Post
If you want to make a career, an e-mail isn't good enough. Can you quantify that?
Half my emails didn't get a response. I wanted an internship, I didn't email, I got one. I think that qualifies it, my method was successful.


Quote:
Originally Posted by therealbigd View Post
Yes, an e-mail is an easy way out. But take it from me, the person who doesn't answer the e-mail is the same person who answers the phone with "we don't have any internships".
So no harm no foul. Didn't miss out on an opportunity and I didn't have to wait around to get rejected.

Quote:
Originally Posted by therealbigd View Post
If you get off over hearing a voice rather than hearing nothing at all well then I guess phoning works. But equally you run more risk of catching somebody at a bad time and setting a bad first impression.
That's a fine risk, because some engineer's that were busy either called me back later, (no harm, no foul) or took a few minutes to give advice. On two occasions they just said "I don't have an internship, try somewhere else," might have been rude, but again, who wants to work for free with a douchbag?

Quote:
Originally Posted by therealbigd View Post
Most interns suck. Can you quantify that too?
Besides complaints about interns on these forums, other forums, hearing it from the engineer I'm working with, other engineers I've spoken with and the engineers that rejected me, no. There is no proof that many interns sucks, they are all 5 star gems pumping out hit records. That is a silly question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by therealbigd View Post
So it's not an attack on engineers, just interns.
Cool. For an intern.
Not an attack on interns either, I'm simply giving my advice on what worked for me. Everyone should get a chance, many find out it isn't for them, some are told it isn't, and some make it.

I do now have an internship, you may not like the method I chose to get it, and seem to think I'm complete rubbish, however you made my case out to be hopeless and yet I have my internship and I'm telling my story hoping other people who want to go down this path find some good, helpful advice.
Old 20th October 2011
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jajamon View Post
Half my emails didn't get a response. I wanted an internship, I didn't email, I got one. I think that qualifies it, my method was successful.
I ran a marathon in 4h 30min, after a full year of training. The next year I didn't train. At all. Except 1 run the week before. I ran that one in 3h 30min.

That doesn't quantify the best training for a marathon being no training at all.

Quote:
Besides complaints about interns on these forums, other forums, hearing it from the engineer I'm working with, other engineers I've spoken with and the engineers that rejected me, no. There is no proof that many interns sucks, they are all 5 star gems pumping out hit records. That is a silly question.
But you ARE an intern! So you can't go saying "interns are rubbish... except me" - that makes you look proper silly.

Quote:
Not an attack on interns either, I'm simply giving my advice on what worked for me. Everyone should get a chance, many find out it isn't for them, some are told it isn't, and some make it.

I do now have an internship, you may not like the method I chose to get it, and seem to think I'm complete rubbish, however you made my case out to be hopeless and yet I have my internship and I'm telling my story hoping other people who want to go down this path find some good, helpful advice.
It quite clearly was an attack on interns. You said they were all crap!

But I'm very happy for you. I wish I could have an unpaid job too. I'll have to settle with getting paid until then.

Old 20th October 2011
  #23
Gear Nut
 
Cb Media's Avatar
LOL!!! rapid decline going on here...
Old 21st October 2011
  #24
Gear Nut
 

I think I will try emailing first and see if that leads to anything. If not, then I will go with the advice above and start calling people. Maybe one of the two options will work.
Old 22nd October 2011
  #25
Here for the gear
 

Yeah, sorry everybody. I don't don't play well with bullies. Dickie, let us know how you do!
Old 23rd October 2011
  #26
Gear Nut
 
doose80's Avatar
I dont understand why people think that 'studio managers' are god-like...

To tell someone that you shouldnt do this or that is total bulls..t
If you're serious about a job or a career, you do whatever it takes to get there.

Sure, studio time is money, but persistance does pay off.

To the OP, I say go for gold mate....it seems like you're carrying it out in a respectful manner.

....and before anyone asks, I get constant emails & young guys turning up un-announced every week.
I dont drop the session to talk to them, I make sure I find time to meet properly & discuss whatever...
Old 24th October 2011
  #27
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jajamon View Post
Yeah, sorry everybody. I don't don't play well with bullies. Dickie, let us know how you do!
Awwww was I bullying you? Diddums. I'm sorry. Don't get your big brother on me.

Actually I was just advising somebody not to make a pain in the arse out of themselves. It does help.
Old 24th October 2011
  #28
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by doose80 View Post
I dont understand why people think that 'studio managers' are god-like...
Who said they're God Like?

They are an employer though. And need to be treated accordingly.

And unlike many jobs, have the exclusive position of having thousands of people willing to sell their grannies to get the job.
Old 26th October 2011
  #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by doose80 View Post
I dont understand why people think that 'studio managers' are god-like...

To tell someone that you shouldnt do this or that is total bulls..t
If you're serious about a job or a career, you do whatever it takes to get there.

Sure, studio time is money, but persistance does pay off.

To the OP, I say go for gold mate....it seems like you're carrying it out in a respectful manner.

....and before anyone asks, I get constant emails & young guys turning up un-announced every week.
I dont drop the session to talk to them, I make sure I find time to meet properly & discuss whatever...
Nor God like, but you want to make a good first impression right? and turning up unannounced mid session and getting in the way isn't the way to do that! Studio managers (if they're doing a good job) are VERY busy people - and if they're not busy, the studio probably isn't either!

I'm nobody in the grand scheme of things, and I still get multiple people emailing me each week asking if they can sit in with me at various points. If I helped everybody out I'd have a permanent shadow, and if I found time to meet them all, I'd have a 2nd full time job. Not to say I blow everybody out, and never help anyone, but you do have to pick and choose a bit.
Old 26th October 2011
  #30
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
I'm nobody in the grand scheme of things, and I still get multiple people emailing me each week asking if they can sit in with me at various points. If I helped everybody out I'd have a permanent shadow, and if I found time to meet them all, I'd have a 2nd full time job. Not to say I blow everybody out, and never help anyone, but you do have to pick and choose a bit.
Awww I'd love to feel wanted like you

Nobody wants to follow me around putting metal into venue roofs.
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