The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Mixing R&B vocals
Old 6th September 2011
  #1
Lives for gear
 
bexarametric's Avatar
 

Mixing R&B vocals

So here's my two part question.

What methods do you use when the client gives you a music bed that is in stereo (no multitrack) and then you record all the vocals on top of it? I want to kind of glue it together and make it sound like "one". The music bed was mixed well and isn't squashed too much. I would prefer the multitrack music bed, but apparently it isn't available.

The other question. What are some mixing methods you use when there are like 40 stacked vocals on a chorus? It just seems like there is an unnecessary amount of doubles, triples and even quads of individual parts.

I mainly record metal bands where I usually only have to double vocals to make them sound big. I know in R&B it's all about the stacked voices. I get that. But it seems there's an overwhelming amount of vocals to manage. We only used one mic, but i made them vary their distances a bit to fill up the space on the mix differently. I was just wondering what someo of you have learned to successfully manage these large amounts of vocals.

Thanks

Last edited by bexarametric; 6th September 2011 at 01:25 AM.. Reason: Needed more cowbell
Old 6th September 2011
  #2
Here for the gear
 

Hey first I would pan the vocals, and group stacks by each harmony part, usually 3 part or 4 part harmony. if I have 3 I usually hard pan 2 left and right, and leave the 3rd one straight up (stacks of 4 hard pan 2 left and 2 right), and get a good blend on the stacks the root is the one I would make dominant and tuck the low and high below it. its easier if you make groups of each one. R&B Vocals don't really need a lot of Reverb like metal, so try using more delays than Verb, less is best, good luck!!!!!!!!!
Old 6th September 2011
  #3
Registered User
Random ideas:

Group folders, definately.

When stacking lots of vocals, I find that breath sounds can be a problem. I used to manually edit these out - lots of work - and just leave the best sounding breath on one track.

A gate plugin can be used so that multiple tracks are gated to one specific track - e.g. the best one that you've edited.

If you like working with midi, a midi gate is another option.

If tuning - don't mash them all into equal temperment A440 ... unless you want to ...

Compress each group, and then create sub groups and compress again. Multiple stages of mild compression can be better than aggressive compression over the lot.

Contraversial, but I would Limit each group too ...

IMO, this layering effect is rather similar to what a reverb unit does ... essentially you are creating multiple "tight echoes" with very subtle timing differences. So not a lot of processing is needed with this natural chorusing

Use Freeze or offline processing, or whatever it's called in your DAW of choice, to unload CPU. For example ... if you have 50 vocal tracks streaming from disk, mixed to a few subgroups, and then mixed to a stereo track with compression ... if you freeze that track, you effectively create a stereo audio file that replaces everything leading up to that point. So you could then disable all 50 tracks and save a bunch of disk and CPU resources at that point. Depending on how your DAW handles this - you might need to manually bounce down.
Old 6th September 2011
  #4
Lives for gear
 
bexarametric's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwi View Post
Random ideas:

Group folders, definately.

When stacking lots of vocals, I find that breath sounds can be a problem. I used to manually edit these out - lots of work - and just leave the best sounding breath on one track.

A gate plugin can be used so that multiple tracks are gated to one specific track - e.g. the best one that you've edited.

If you like working with midi, a midi gate is another option.

If tuning - don't mash them all into equal temperment A440 ... unless you want to ...

Compress each group, and then create sub groups and compress again. Multiple stages of mild compression can be better than aggressive compression over the lot.

Contraversial, but I would Limit each group too ...

IMO, this layering effect is rather similar to what a reverb unit does ... essentially you are creating multiple "tight echoes" with very subtle timing differences. So not a lot of processing is needed with this natural chorusing

Use Freeze or offline processing, or whatever it's called in your DAW of choice, to unload CPU. For example ... if you have 50 vocal tracks streaming from disk, mixed to a few subgroups, and then mixed to a stereo track with compression ... if you freeze that track, you effectively create a stereo audio file that replaces everything leading up to that point. So you could then disable all 50 tracks and save a bunch of disk and CPU resources at that point. Depending on how your DAW handles this - you might need to manually bounce down.
Thanks
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump