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Studiomaster Mixdown Classic 8-24 DAW Software
Old 10th August 2011
  #1
Gear Head
 
ONELOUDPRODUCTIO's Avatar
 

Studiomaster Mixdown Classic 8-24

I have a Studiomaster Mixdown Classic 24 channel 8 bus coming. I should have it by the end of next week. I paid $700.00 for it shipped including the meter bridge and power supply. My question is, does anyone have any input on this board. A lot of what I have read is mostly positive feedback. It has a lot of very useful features, and it's supposed to have some decent pre's and a decent eq. I want to use it so I can start mixing out of the box. Any feedback or advice would be helpful. I will be using it with Pro Tools 8 and a digi002 with the blacklion audio mod, I also have a emperical labs distressor and a few other pieces of outboard gear.

Did I make a good buy?
Old 26th November 2011
  #2
Gear Head
 

I own two

I find it interesting that you found the mixdown classic in good company! Normally this is not the standard response. I do own two of these and I have had good success to this point, but usually as a monitor board for the studio and not a "mix OTB" as you have asked about. This does not mean you cannot get good results, just make sure you have clean power to the power supply. I used normal utility power on mine, then went to separately derived source, i.e. transformer or in my case balanced power. Since that time, my noise floor dropped tremendously and there exists so littly noise that my sub human ear cannot hear any noise at all! Again, I am currently using these consoles as monitor boards. FWIW, I will go against the grain and say, it is a good console for monitoring and basic OTB projects, but I think you will find the board lacking for professional head-to-head competition to many like consoles on the market (Allen&Heath, Focusrite). Let me know how it turns out!!!
Old 26th November 2011
  #3
I bought one to hold me over when leaving my job at a commercial facility. Made a little money using it for 8 months or so. My buddy has it now in his studio, and likes it well enough.

What I think is cool:
It's clean enough, quiet enough. Use outboard pres if you got em'. Get a few 4 band eq's for overheads, and other things. Or eq in the daw mostly. The midi mute function is great to have, definitely use it. Definitely not sterile sounding.

The low end and mid eq, believe it or not, is great on bass guitar. When I sold it, I immediately missed it's sound on bass. I still do. I once dialed in this Jeff Berlin type tone on this desk. I mean, I have rarely ever gotten close to that tone...ever. For some reason, this little console does it with ease. Laugh if you want, but to me, it resembles the Trident 80 bottom end quite a bit.

The 12k shelf eq is ok, kinda airy. Overall, I think it is not as open as a Mackie or Ghost, but maybe thicker sounding. It definitely stands out from desks of that mid 90's era as sounding totally different than any of the usual suspects. Knobs are these cool rubber things...feel kinda nice.

The circuitry is setup using a lot of the same parts as Japanese consoles...NJM chips etc. No fan on the psu, so no noise there.

Cool having a split design, and also cool having their answer to the Mix B thing, the 16 channels of line mixer inputs.

Input choices are cool on the channel I/O, and the output / control room features are there.

I think they look pretty cool, except for the STUDIOMASTER logo itself

The bad and the ugly:

The build is not real solid. The board lacks a good deal of headroom, so you really have to micro manage your levels. The jacks are all plastic, so use a patch bay so as not to wear them out.

The psu is also not built real well, nor the umbillical cable to connect to it.

There are no individual channels, so if something craps out, you have to pull the whole pcb. Also, like most every budget console, it ships from the factory with tiny caps. If you can solder, try upping the values of the decoupling caps at least.

The name made a lot of clients look at it funny. I have no idea why they would call a company "Studiomaster". It sounds like a RONCO product, you know, the Ginsu knive people from late night TV? I realize it goes way back from the 1970's, but I personally think they would have done well to change the blasted company name. They might still be in business today.

The cheeseball name belies the results this board is capable of though, IMHO.

The bottom end is down 3 db at 30hz. This is not a big deal, and actually as I stated, the bass end sounds real nice. Just a note. It probably has to do with the miniature caps.

The eq's are laid out strangely for trying to cope with mids. This can tie your hands in a few situations. No boosting 5 khz and sweeping out 350 at the same time on this board on a guitar track for example.

The low eq, is an adjustable shelf thing, that you can boost or cut with. Problem is, if you use this to cut, then want to boost somewhere above, you can't if using the mid band for anything. Plus the mid band doesn't go very far down anyway. Doesn't go very high up either. Also, if I remember correctly, there is no hi pass filter on a switch.

This makes the eq a little limited, but nowadays you can do a lot in the daw prior to hitting the console.

The inserts are like mackie and others, on trs jacks. The buttons for busses are teeny tiny, and are a little cheapish.

I dunno, as bizarre as this little console is, and with all it's drawbacks, I still miss it, and have a soft spot for it.

It is a cool but really quirky console. When it sounds good, it amazes you what is emanating from the thing. Other days, life was a tad of a struggle trying to get the mix "there". Mostly the eq limitation is why I sold it, but the bottom and low mids were why I loved it. Ironic.

If you watch your levels, you can get a "pro" mix outta it.

Good luck, I hope this helps some.

john
Old 16th November 2012
  #4
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NEWTON IN ORBIT View Post
I bought one to hold me over when leaving my job at a commercial facility. Made a little money using it for 8 months or so. My buddy has it now in his studio, and likes it well enough.

What I think is cool:
It's clean enough, quiet enough. Use outboard pres if you got em'. Get a few 4 band eq's for overheads, and other things. Or eq in the daw mostly. The midi mute function is great to have, definitely use it. Definitely not sterile sounding.

The low end and mid eq, believe it or not, is great on bass guitar. When I sold it, I immediately missed it's sound on bass. I still do. I once dialed in this Jeff Berlin type tone on this desk. I mean, I have rarely ever gotten close to that tone...ever. For some reason, this little console does it with ease. Laugh if you want, but to me, it resembles the Trident 80 bottom end quite a bit.

The 12k shelf eq is ok, kinda airy. Overall, I think it is not as open as a Mackie or Ghost, but maybe thicker sounding. It definitely stands out from desks of that mid 90's era as sounding totally different than any of the usual suspects. Knobs are these cool rubber things...feel kinda nice.

The circuitry is setup using a lot of the same parts as Japanese consoles...NJM chips etc. No fan on the psu, so no noise there.

Cool having a split design, and also cool having their answer to the Mix B thing, the 16 channels of line mixer inputs.

Input choices are cool on the channel I/O, and the output / control room features are there.

I think they look pretty cool, except for the STUDIOMASTER logo itself

The bad and the ugly:

The build is not real solid. The board lacks a good deal of headroom, so you really have to micro manage your levels. The jacks are all plastic, so use a patch bay so as not to wear them out.

The psu is also not built real well, nor the umbillical cable to connect to it.

There are no individual channels, so if something craps out, you have to pull the whole pcb. Also, like most every budget console, it ships from the factory with tiny caps. If you can solder, try upping the values of the decoupling caps at least.

The name made a lot of clients look at it funny. I have no idea why they would call a company "Studiomaster". It sounds like a RONCO product, you know, the Ginsu knive people from late night TV? I realize it goes way back from the 1970's, but I personally think they would have done well to change the blasted company name. They might still be in business today.

The cheeseball name belies the results this board is capable of though, IMHO.

The bottom end is down 3 db at 30hz. This is not a big deal, and actually as I stated, the bass end sounds real nice. Just a note. It probably has to do with the miniature caps.

The eq's are laid out strangely for trying to cope with mids. This can tie your hands in a few situations. No boosting 5 khz and sweeping out 350 at the same time on this board on a guitar track for example.

The low eq, is an adjustable shelf thing, that you can boost or cut with. Problem is, if you use this to cut, then want to boost somewhere above, you can't if using the mid band for anything. Plus the mid band doesn't go very far down anyway. Doesn't go very high up either. Also, if I remember correctly, there is no hi pass filter on a switch.

This makes the eq a little limited, but nowadays you can do a lot in the daw prior to hitting the console.

The inserts are like mackie and others, on trs jacks. The buttons for busses are teeny tiny, and are a little cheapish.

I dunno, as bizarre as this little console is, and with all it's drawbacks, I still miss it, and have a soft spot for it.

It is a cool but really quirky console. When it sounds good, it amazes you what is emanating from the thing. Other days, life was a tad of a struggle trying to get the mix "there". Mostly the eq limitation is why I sold it, but the bottom and low mids were why I loved it. Ironic.

If you watch your levels, you can get a "pro" mix outta it.

Good luck, I hope this helps some.

john
hey guys mine i think just **** the bed.... my auxiliary on the external power supply will not light up... please help!
Old 29th November 2017
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by NEWTON IN ORBIT View Post
I bought one to hold me over when leaving my job at a commercial facility. Made a little money using it for 8 months or so. My buddy has it now in his studio, and likes it well enough.

What I think is cool:
It's clean enough, quiet enough. Use outboard pres if you got em'. Get a few 4 band eq's for overheads, and other things. Or eq in the daw mostly. The midi mute function is great to have, definitely use it. Definitely not sterile sounding.

The low end and mid eq, believe it or not, is great on bass guitar. When I sold it, I immediately missed it's sound on bass. I still do. I once dialed in this Jeff Berlin type tone on this desk. I mean, I have rarely ever gotten close to that tone...ever. For some reason, this little console does it with ease. Laugh if you want, but to me, it resembles the Trident 80 bottom end quite a bit.

The 12k shelf eq is ok, kinda airy. Overall, I think it is not as open as a Mackie or Ghost, but maybe thicker sounding. It definitely stands out from desks of that mid 90's era as sounding totally different than any of the usual suspects. Knobs are these cool rubber things...feel kinda nice.

The circuitry is setup using a lot of the same parts as Japanese consoles...NJM chips etc. No fan on the psu, so no noise there.

Cool having a split design, and also cool having their answer to the Mix B thing, the 16 channels of line mixer inputs.

Input choices are cool on the channel I/O, and the output / control room features are there.

I think they look pretty cool, except for the STUDIOMASTER logo itself

The bad and the ugly:

The build is not real solid. The board lacks a good deal of headroom, so you really have to micro manage your levels. The jacks are all plastic, so use a patch bay so as not to wear them out.

The psu is also not built real well, nor the umbillical cable to connect to it.

There are no individual channels, so if something craps out, you have to pull the whole pcb. Also, like most every budget console, it ships from the factory with tiny caps. If you can solder, try upping the values of the decoupling caps at least.

The name made a lot of clients look at it funny. I have no idea why they would call a company "Studiomaster". It sounds like a RONCO product, you know, the Ginsu knive people from late night TV? I realize it goes way back from the 1970's, but I personally think they would have done well to change the blasted company name. They might still be in business today.

The cheeseball name belies the results this board is capable of though, IMHO.

The bottom end is down 3 db at 30hz. This is not a big deal, and actually as I stated, the bass end sounds real nice. Just a note. It probably has to do with the miniature caps.

The eq's are laid out strangely for trying to cope with mids. This can tie your hands in a few situations. No boosting 5 khz and sweeping out 350 at the same time on this board on a guitar track for example.

The low eq, is an adjustable shelf thing, that you can boost or cut with. Problem is, if you use this to cut, then want to boost somewhere above, you can't if using the mid band for anything. Plus the mid band doesn't go very far down anyway. Doesn't go very high up either. Also, if I remember correctly, there is no hi pass filter on a switch.

This makes the eq a little limited, but nowadays you can do a lot in the daw prior to hitting the console.

The inserts are like mackie and others, on trs jacks. The buttons for busses are teeny tiny, and are a little cheapish.

I dunno, as bizarre as this little console is, and with all it's drawbacks, I still miss it, and have a soft spot for it.

It is a cool but really quirky console. When it sounds good, it amazes you what is emanating from the thing. Other days, life was a tad of a struggle trying to get the mix "there". Mostly the eq limitation is why I sold it, but the bottom and low mids were why I loved it. Ironic.

If you watch your levels, you can get a "pro" mix outta it.

Good luck, I hope this helps some.

john
great info! I dig up this thread as I'm curious to buy and use this beast as a Tracking machine. I wish to patch tons of mics and just go for a blast when I record: static pair, M260 pair, one channel of guitar pedal madness, a couple of wet channels too...

good preamps ?
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