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best guitar tuner for under 50 bucks???
Old 3rd June 2011
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sounds Great View Post
Nobody needs a thousand dollar strobe tuner to tune a guitar.


I have an old Korg WT-12 like this one that I got in the early 80's. Still going strong! I tune pianos with it too, what a great tuner. Too bad nobody makes an analog tuner like this anymore.

those are not accurate.
Old 3rd June 2011
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fu Schnickens View Post
Guitars aren't 100% accurate! So what. We
play them anyway.
it is if you have a compensated nut and tune it properly. which is why you need a strobe so you can adjust to cents

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fu Schnickens View Post
Strobe tuning works perfectly as long as you are tuning your guitar. As soon as you start to play, tuning becomes kinda relative.
correct that why when you record you tune to the key of the song
this is why you use a strobe. I personally retune for each section of a song if needed

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fu Schnickens View Post
I don't see the point of spending $1000
peterson has a $50 sw tuner

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fu Schnickens View Post
it will probably need retuning in ten minutes.
by your philosophy why not just tune by ear ? why even use a tuner

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fu Schnickens View Post
Piano is different. Besides, the OP wanted a tuner for less than $50, which might exclude many strobes.
piano is a different beast based on temperament and 'stretching'


I take tuning seriously when I record. If some of you don't that's fine, but all professional players and techs use strobes they have for 40 years. I'm just passing that info along.
Old 3rd June 2011
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sounds Great View Post
far more accurate than needed for most normal applications.
that may be true
Old 3rd June 2011
  #34
Quote:
I take tuning seriously when I record. If some of you don't that's fine but all professional players and techs use strobes
Each and every mother-lovin' son of 'em.

heh

Your tendency to see the world in absolutes cracks me up.

Wasn't it earlier in this thread that you were insisting on the 'fact' that digital tuners couldn't tune as accurately as a strobe and now (after I cited some of the marketing specs from high end tuner maker Peterson) a few posts above you're advocating digital tuners with 'virtual strobe displays' -- that derive their tuning information from the same types of digital algorithms as digital tuners with virtual needles or other displays?

Come one, man, think before you write and maybe even do a little quick research before you bet the farm on your absolutist statements.

One thing about absolutes -- in most cases they are absolutely wrong. This is (mostly) a very fuzzy world.
Old 3rd June 2011
  #35
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Silent Sound's Avatar
As far as tuning accuracy goes, most any tuner will work. Even if you tune a guitar perfectly, only the open notes will be in tune. Buzz Feiten anyone? It's all a relative game, and most any tuner will get you close enough. Now, one thing I notice about some tuners or others is how quickly they pick up notes and how much background noise they can tolerate when tuning an acoustic instrument. Some have problems picking up notes in certain frequencies. For example, I have a Fender tuner that won't pick up my mandolin and a Sabine tuner that has problems holding notes from my violin. I generally prefer the Sabine since it seems to pick up notes quicker and isn't as effected by background noise, both were well under $50. My overall favorite tuner is the Boss TU-12 (not the EX or BW). You should be able to find one used for around your price range. It's nothing fancy, but it's never had a problem with any instrument I've thrown at it. We used these in band class back in school and they were great for every instrument in the room!
Old 3rd June 2011
  #36
Question for you EE types:

Were early non-strobe electronic tuners actually analog? Did they use varactor technology?

And, if so, what assurance was there that they wouldn't drift like other analog frequency detection and control circuits.

(It may not be pertinent to recall the radically drifting pitch of the Mini-Moog I cut my teeth on in the 80s but when I started digging on this, it was one of the first things that came to mind.)


I'm actually glad to have been prodded into reading up on stroboscopic tuners because it's a) really a nifty idea and b) really fascinating reading about the lengths they have to go to to provide accuracy against absolute references. You have to hand it to some of the old school inventors... they really came up with some fascinating -- and quite admirable -- ways of accomplishing some pretty hard tasks.


FWIW, it's not always practical, since it's dependent on having a quiet environment, but I still like a reference tone and relative tuning. (I had problems with relative tuning until i found one really helpful tactic: after I've tuned the starting string to the reference tone, I then fret that string appropriately, play it, lock that pitch in my mind, kill that string and all the other strings (since they've probably picked up some sympathetic vibrations) and then tune the next string from the memory of the reference pitch. (Some days I'm better at that than others.) When I first came on the tactic, it struck me as kind of odd -- but then I realized that I was becoming confused by the sympathetic vibrations.

Better still, as long as you have confidence in the accuracy of the interrelationship of your reference tones, is to play the require pitches from a trusted source over headphones and tune the strings to it. Having the reference tone in your cans means pretty much no sympathetic vibrations/interference with the string(s). And that way you don't have to count on your pitch memory.
Old 3rd June 2011
  #37
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post

Wasn't it earlier in this thread that you were insisting on the 'fact' that digital tuners couldn't tune as accurately as a strobe and now (after I cited some of the marketing specs from high end tuner maker Peterson) a few posts above you're advocating digital tuners with 'virtual strobe displays' -- that derive their tuning information from the same types of digital algorithms as digital tuners with virtual needles or other displays?
I though I cleared that up by admitting I used the term 'digital tuner' rather loosely

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
Each and every mother-lovin' son of 'em.
Your tendency to see the world in absolutes cracks me up.
lol, you took my 'digital tuner' reference as absolute.

fergetit..... I made my point. which was you can't do offsets and tempered tunings with a standard digital or quartz tuner
since they don't give you cent interval data
Old 3rd June 2011
  #38
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funkycam's Avatar
 

+1 on SNARK
Old 3rd June 2011
  #39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sounds Great View Post
My WT-12 tuner is definitely not digital. It was released in 1979.





KORG CORPORATE HISTORY
I was more thinking that early electronic tuners may have made use of Nyquist Theorem-derived frequency sampling. But I'll fess up to near-complete ignorance on the topic. And my pals Google and Wikipedia, this time around, were not forthcoming with much-needed illumination. Anyone know the basic operational scoop on early (non-strobe) electronic tuners?
Old 3rd June 2011
  #40
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertshaw View Post
I though I cleared that up by admitting I used the term 'digital tuner' rather loosely



lol, you took my 'digital tuner' reference as absolute.

fergetit..... I made my point. which was you can't do offsets and tempered tunings with a standard digital or quartz tuner
since they don't give you cent interval data
OK... I think you win on that point. 'Standard' is, indeed, a kind of qualifier, you're right, in that it suggests there may be nonstandard digital tuner that provides exceptions.


Point to robertshaw.
Old 3rd June 2011
  #41
Gear Addict
 
Fu Schnickens's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by robertshaw View Post
it is if you have a compensated nut and tune it properly. which is why you need a strobe so you can adjust to cents



correct that why when you record you tune to the key of the song
this is why you use a strobe. I personally retune for each section of a song if needed


peterson has a $50 sw tuner


by your philosophy why not just tune by ear ? why even use a tuner


piano is a different beast based on temperament and 'stretching'


I take tuning seriously when I record. If some of you don't that's fine, but all professional players and techs use strobes they have for 40 years. I'm just passing that info along.

Ugh! Stop! We get it. Strobe tuners may be technically, marginally more accurate than digital. Practically speaking, it may not matter. Another point for recording and filibuster technique.
Old 4th June 2011
  #42
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T'Mershi Duween's Avatar
 

I tune to the resonant frequency of the universe... heh
Old 4th June 2011
  #43
Ohm... er... I mean Ommmm...
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