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Post Rates on Website?
Old 22nd July 2011
  #31
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drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralPStudios View Post
x457534.
Really? I guess I'm in a different time zone.... heh I've never booked a session off a website, and never had one booked. Old Skool.....
Old 23rd July 2011
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
Really? I guess I'm in a different time zone.... heh I've never booked a session off a website, and never had one booked. Old Skool.....
I get it done both ways. .
Old 12th September 2011
  #33
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crewstudios's Avatar
 

I wouldn't. Sliding scale keeps the studio going through slower times. And higher rates on your site may prevent the up and comers (who may be the best songwriters you've ever heard) from booking with you because they feel they can't afford you.
Old 5th October 2011
  #34
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s.d.finley's Avatar
Yes. Post rates.
Old 30th December 2011
  #35
so it seems the consensus is not to reveal rates...

so it seems the consensus is not to reveal rates...
but i remember when i was younger, it felt like whenever I came across a studio that didn't post it's rates I automatically assumed it was out of my price range. Part of me is concerned with losing possible clients because of their fearful, "worst case scenario" mentality. meanwhile i agree that a sliding scale is a better way to charge. anybody else relate? i have a upper-mid level studio here in Hollywood.
does anyone have any opinions about how effective posting rates can be based on the level/price point of a studio?
Old 4th January 2012
  #36
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spindlebox's Avatar
YES

I hate going to websites that don't spell it out for me.

I have a few packages with very clear "this is what you get". These are flat rate. I have found that spelling things out in detail for people, prevents that sticker shock later.

Most people are expecting to have to pay for your service. Be honest with them up front and your credibility will be good from the get-go.
Old 4th January 2012
  #37
Gear Head
 

I'm the same, when booking other places, i want to know up front - also stops time wasters
Old 6th January 2012
  #38
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drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindlebox View Post
Be honest with them up front and your credibility will be good from the get-go.
I don't see anything DIS-honest about not posting rates. IMO, they vary, and I can't quote an accurate price unless I know the details. Pretty simple actually....
Old 7th January 2012
  #39
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spindlebox's Avatar
I don't think I said it was DIS-honest.

And I also don't see what is "pretty simple" about having to price out everything that walks through the door.

If I did that, I'd be spending more time quoting people than actually getting any work done.

I record, I mix, I produce, I master. Not many variables involved no matter what the details, the process is the same. If there is uncertainty involved, they pay an hourly rate. Simple.
Old 23rd January 2012
  #40
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spindlebox's Avatar
I don't know. I don't disagree with you, Frank. If you can do it, do it. I personally like going to sites that list prices. I am immediately suspicious that there is going to be "hidden" charges if it's not all spelled out for me. There are lots of people like me.

Also, I get told time and time again that my studio was chosen because all of the information is there, and they were able to make an educated decision.

Most of my customers come from Google and Craigslist; or from word of mouth. 90% of the deals happen via text or e-mail. I've even done deals completely by email, with them mailing me deposit. I haven't actually met some of them face to face until they were here on the day.

So, laying it all out on the line works for me. I don't believe in pricing "structures". It requires too much thought. This is what I charge, and this is what you get. This way, I can focus on the session itself, and deal with the artistic concerns rather than all of the business hullabaloo. The business part takes care of itself, because everybody knows what they're in for from the outset.

I enjoy reading how everyone else does it though!! Thanks to all who have contributed.
Old 23rd January 2012
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spindlebox View Post
I don't know. I don't disagree with you, Frank. If you can do it, do it. I personally like going to sites that list prices. I am immediately suspicious that there is going to be "hidden" charges if it's not all spelled out for me. There are lots of people like me.
i don't list rates on my site. i want the chance to cut a break to a great young songwriter, or a chance to ask more from someone whose father is a corporate real estate lawyer in NYC.

but once we're talking, i will absolutely send a detailed estimate + cost breakdown for a project, before the client commits.

or, if it's a simple hourly structure (for tracking vocals or whatever), i will be very clear about communicating which parts of a session will be considered on the clock (most everything) and which will be considered off the clock (studio troubleshooting of more than 10 or 15 minutes)
Old 3rd February 2012
  #42
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Quint's Avatar
Why not just post daily and hourly rates and then say to call for multi day rates? Any artist that you might want to cut a break for is going to be there for more than one day anyway right? If not then it probably wasn't something you were going to take some sort of emotional investment in anyway.

It's kind of the best of both worlds if you ask me. It also helps to separate the wheat from the chaffe in terms of what you are charging. Plus, who wants to cut a break on a single day or even four hour blocks? A potential customer has to sign up for multiple days before I would consider cutting them a break and then it would all depend on any number of factors. At least that way you can appease those people that need to see a price upfront on your website while also giving yourself the flexibility to negotiate for whatever reason you see fit.
Old 6th February 2012
  #43
Lives for gear
Good article targeted at web/graphic designers but relevant to the topic & explores the subtle communication you might not realize is happening when you start talking about rates. Good stuff.

A List Apart: Articles: Pricing Strategy for Creatives

Quote:
Strategic pricing helps your brand and helps you to make more money. Issuing a price is like handing out a business card—it’s a great branding tool, but be careful about what it says to your market. Beginning relationships with customers at a high price makes the statement: “we’re good at what we do and we know it.” Fighting with a competitor over a low price says “I’m uncertain about my abilities, so I’ll take what I can get.” Failing to use a considered pricing policy will leave you treading water in a sea of design mediocrity, allowing you to just stay afloat while you sell commodities. Blah.
Old 16th February 2012
  #44
Gear Nut
 

I quote a day price on my website so that people can get a rough idea of the cost before they get in touch, most of my clients come from personal contact or the website and i'd rather they knew if they can afford me before they email or phone.
Once a dialog has started we can talk about deals for longer sessions or hourly rates if they only need a few hours, but when i used to show an hourly rate on the site i got calls from people wanting one hour "karaoke" sessions and they are really not worth opening the studio for.

I usually ask a client what their budget for the project is and then tell them what i can do for that.

My studio isn't the most expensive in the area (Peter Gabriels Realworld isn't far from here) but it isn't the cheapest either. I aim to get clients that don't have big label budgets but still want something that sounds like a professionally releasable product, and i try to stay away from cheap demo recording (although i still end up doing them sometimes).

So i think giving an idea of the price is useful for people wondering which studio to call.

Please all feel free to look at my website and tell me whats wrong with it.
Old 17th February 2012
  #45
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spindlebox's Avatar
Ahh, so Doug you live in BOX? I went there and to Real World Studios back in the early '90's. I was in BATH for a week or so and couldn't resist.

Good point about the hourly rates bringing the strange ones out of the woodwork. I got a call from a band that wanted to know that if they came in real quick and busted out a song real fast could I have it mixed all for an hour!

LOL! I told them that it was X amount per song (as it states on my site), but unfortunately with that hourly price the wheels start spinning in their heads and they try to figure out how to god they can get it done for a ridiculously short amount of time.

I will have to re-evaluate.

If anyone is curious about my rates, you are welcome to visit my site and give me feedback as well. I would definitely find it welcome.

Audio Cave Recording Studio

Cheers, and thanks to everyone for their very insightful opinions and experience!!
Old 17th February 2012
  #46
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spindlebox View Post
Ahh, so Doug you live in BOX? I went there and to Real World Studios back in the early '90's. I was in BATH for a week or so and couldn't resist.

Good point about the hourly rates bringing the strange ones out of the woodwork. I got a call from a band that wanted to know that if they came in real quick and busted out a song real fast could I have it mixed all for an hour!

LOL! I told them that it was X amount per song (as it states on my site), but unfortunately with that hourly price the wheels start spinning in their heads and they try to figure out how to god they can get it done for a ridiculously short amount of time.

I will have to re-evaluate.

If anyone is curious about my rates, you are welcome to visit my site and give me feedback as well. I would definitely find it welcome.

Audio Cave Recording Studio

Cheers, and thanks to everyone for their very insightful opinions and experience!!
Box is about 15 miles from here, but i'm not really in competiton with Realworld - i don't have a stream under my control room floor!
Your site looks good. How do you find the "price per album" deals go? I used to do a "record 4 tracks live" package but then found that i ended up working longer than intended if the band were crap, Thats why i went over to daily rates.
Old 18th February 2012
  #47
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spindlebox's Avatar
Hey Doug,

Yes my price per album deals are GREAT!! Actually all of those packages sell well, but you must place limits on the amount of hours you include. That's the thing you have to be a stick in the mud about with no exceptions.

For my full album package, it is two 8 hour sessions (16 hours total) of RECORDING time (we record everyone live here, then do overdubs as needed), any amount of time needed above that, I get my normal hourly rate and then we're on a per hour basis until project completion. I do some mixing on my own time, just because the studio is in my house, and all my equipment is paid for and my overhead is extremely low, ergo, it is more important to me to have happy customers than to nickle and dime. It's in my best interest for my mixes to kick ass, so it's worth my extra time I put in "off the clock" - because it pays with repeat business and referrals. However, if clients want to sit in on a mix, then they book the time and pay by the hour. This is where my hourly rate comes in handy. This works very well for me and my clients are always happy and I always get repeats and referrals. Who can complain about that?

I can get away with this because I mix fast though so the time I spend "off the clock" is usually not very much. I average between 2-4 hours per mix, but it's because I am very organized during recording, and actually a little mixing is happening during the overdub phase. I'm sure my average would be longer, even doubled perhaps, if I had to do discovery on someone else's project.
Old 10th April 2012
  #48
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jimcroisdale's Avatar
 

Do you not find that 12 tracks, tracked AND mixed in 16 hours is almost always impossible though?
Old 11th April 2012
  #49
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Jim. Yes, absolutely impossible! I didn't say that I got the recording AND mixing done in 16 hours. Recording YES, it's been done for 12 songs by bands that have their act together. But mixing - hell no.

Any time over is charged at my regular hourly rate, for recording, and I usually book a session with the bands and they mix the first couple with me and pay by the hour. After that, I mix the rest on my own time as part of the deal. I'm still new and this works for everyone, including me, especially considering my overhead is ridiculously low.
Old 5th March 2019
  #50
Here for the gear
 

Whatever feels right for you. I do mastering and put my mastering rates on the site, I even put mastering examples of my work, so people can decide for themselves if it's right for them. What are your pros and cons?

Enhance Sound
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