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Monitor hum from washing machine... Studio Monitors
Old 3rd January 2011
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
Kirk D's Avatar
 

Monitor hum from washing machine...

my home studio is in a room on the same electrical circuit as our kitchen. This has never caused a problem until I recently changed from Genelec 1030A's to Quested S8Rs.

The Quested's emit a 10-20 sec hum whilst the washing machine does a spin, or if the fridge cycles up.

Rewiring, or moving to a different circuit is not an option. What's the best solution to clean up the electric feed to my monitors? Some sort of power conditioner? No other equipment has ever been affected - and the Quested's are dead quiet at all other times.

thanks...

KD
Old 3rd January 2011
  #2
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirk D View Post
.

Rewiring, or moving to a different circuit is not an option
. What's the best solution ...
go back to the Genelecs
Old 3rd January 2011
  #3
Lives for gear
 
mu6gr8's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirk D View Post
my home studio is in a room on the same electrical circuit as our kitchen. This has never caused a problem until I recently changed from Genelec 1030A's to Quested S8Rs.

The Quested's emit a 10-20 sec hum whilst the washing machine does a spin, or if the fridge cycles up.

Rewiring, or moving to a different circuit is not an option. What's the best solution to clean up the electric feed to my monitors? Some sort of power conditioner? No other equipment has ever been affected - and the Quested's are dead quiet at all other times.

thanks...

KD
Try a voltage regulator like the Furman AR-15 or AR-20, depending on your needs. FYI it might not be the monitors, per se...it could be anything in your audio path that has a finicky power supply, so you should plug almost your entire studio into it. If I recall, the one exception is a UPS battery backup, which should not be plugged into the regulator--you'll need to research that yourself or call Furman to confirm.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirk D View Post
my home studio is in a room on the same electrical circuit as our kitchen. This has never caused a problem until I recently changed from Genelec 1030A's to Quested S8Rs.

The Quested's emit a 10-20 sec hum whilst the washing machine does a spin, or if the fridge cycles up.

Rewiring, or moving to a different circuit is not an option. What's the best solution to clean up the electric feed to my monitors? Some sort of power conditioner? No other equipment has ever been affected - and the Quested's are dead quiet at all other times.

thanks...

KD
Rent or own?

Sound [EDIT: sounds] like a new, beefed up panel and wiring might be the way to go (not, sadly, cheap).

I'm thinking the hum is from your (presumably powered) monitors being power-starved as the washer motor is challenged and takes a big gulp of available power.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #5
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loopy's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
Rent or own?

Sound like a new, beefed up panel and wiring might be the way to go (not, sadly, cheap).

I'm thinking the hum is from your (presumably powered) monitors being power-starved as the washer motor is challenged and takes a big gulp of available power.
Bingo!
A new circuit is in order.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
Rent or own?

Sound like a new, beefed up panel and wiring might be the way to go (not, sadly, cheap).

I'm thinking the hum is from your (presumably powered) monitors being power-starved as the washer motor is challenged and takes a big gulp of available power.
Don't get that one !
If it was a power starve issue , then why does it also happen when the fridge turns on (much lower current) ?
Why did it not affect his old monitors ?
Why doesn't it affect other appliances in the property (TVs radios computers etc) ?
Old 3rd January 2011
  #7
Lives for gear
 

Monitor hum from washing machine...

50' extension cord from home depot is the cheapest option! Run it from another room / circuit - and keep it away from audio lines or if they must cross, run them perpendicular. Big broadcast productions run *long* power lines all day long! Just get quality cable (high amp rating, among other things)

Modifying your panel/wiring would, of course, be another option. Probably expensive!

I recently acquired a Tripp-lite brand online UPS that's been awesome isolating my audio gear from "disturbances in the force" caused by errant A/C units and general dirty power. It was particularly satisfying to watch my lights flicker and go out for a moment during a storm while my entire audio rig didn't so much as click or pop.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yago View Post
Don't get that one !
If it was a power starve issue , then why does it also happen when the fridge turns on (much lower current) ?
Why did it not affect his old monitors ?
Why doesn't it affect other appliances in the property (TVs radios computers etc) ?

Any motor load, even on a newer well-designed circuit, will have an in-rush current when it starts which can be many times the rated running load. This in-rush current can draw power even from other circuits in the same distribution panel. It can also be many times the rating of the circuit itself. However, fuses/breakers are designed to allow the momentary overload to pass. Excessive in-rush current can be a sign of a failing motor. The washer motor is a larger load than the fridge compressor motor. In many older homes, where appliances are used on circuits with smaller than ideal wiring or, sharing circuits with other loads, it may be easier to upgrade the actual offending motor load circuit with it's own home run ( dedicated circuit ). OP's post leads me to believe that his washer is sharing circuitry with his kitchen. A washer should be on it's own circuit, as should a fridge and any built-in small appliance. Ideally, these should be 20amp circuits. In fact, in the US, 20amp circuits are required in the kitchen per the National Electric Code, with a minimum of two circuits just for counter top receptacles ( small appliance branch circuits ) .
If it's not possible to run a dedicated circuit to the studio area of OP's house, maybe the offending kitchen circuits can be re-worked. Of course, this is all moot if the wiring in the home is already up-to-date.
The in-rush current probably won't affect smaller loads like TVs, comps, etc, because they use less current anyway. The amps in the studio monitors ( any power amp ) use more current so are more likely to be starved when something else is running on the same line. Are the amps in the new monitors bigger than the old? HTH
Old 3rd January 2011
  #9
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Monitor hum from washing machine...

^ a+
Old 3rd January 2011
  #10
Gear Maniac
 
malgfunk's Avatar
 

It might be a grounding issue with the Quested monitors. Try using A.C. cords without the ground prong by breaking it off if you don't have an A.C. cord adapter.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #11
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Sigma's Avatar
lo there was a red light over our earliest studios soda machine...when people put money in and used it it put a click on the tape ..so it was red light = "recording don't use soda machine"..ahh just a funny memory
Old 3rd January 2011
  #12
Gear Maniac
 
Kirk D's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiritworks View Post
Are the amps in the new monitors bigger than the old? HTH
yes, much bigger. A possible solution could be to run an extension cable from the washer & fridge in the kitchen into a socket in the hall or living room.

@ Malgfunk - As a rule I don't ever mess with removing grounding, etc. I wanna live thx.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #13
Gear Guru
 
John Willett's Avatar
 

Monitor hum from washing machine...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirk D
my home studio is in a room on the same electrical circuit as our kitchen. This has never caused a problem until I recently changed from Genelec 1030A's to Quested S8Rs.

The Quested's emit a 10-20 sec hum whilst the washing machine does a spin, or if the fridge cycles up.

Rewiring, or moving to a different circuit is not an option. What's the best solution to clean up the electric feed to my monitors? Some sort of power conditioner? No other equipment has ever been affected - and the Quested's are dead quiet at all other times.

thanks...

KD
Put a quality RF and spike suppressor on the studio circuit.

Sent from my iPhone using Gearslutz
Old 3rd January 2011
  #14
Lives for gear
 
mu6gr8's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Willett View Post
Put a quality RF and spike suppressor on the studio circuit.
The problem is probably due to not enough power to the monitor amps. That's why a voltage regulator (which will likely include RF & spike suppression anyway) should help.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiritworks View Post
Any motor load, even on a newer well-designed circuit, will have an in-rush current when it starts which can be many times the rated running load. This in-rush current can draw power even from other circuits in the same distribution panel. It can also be many times the rating of the circuit itself. However, fuses/breakers are designed to allow the momentary overload to pass. Excessive in-rush current can be a sign of a failing motor. The washer motor is a larger load than the fridge compressor motor. In many older homes, where appliances are used on circuits with smaller than ideal wiring or, sharing circuits with other loads, it may be easier to upgrade the actual offending motor load circuit with it's own home run ( dedicated circuit ). OP's post leads me to believe that his washer is sharing circuitry with his kitchen. A washer should be on it's own circuit, as should a fridge and any built-in small appliance. Ideally, these should be 20amp circuits. In fact, in the US, 20amp circuits are required in the kitchen per the National Electric Code, with a minimum of two circuits just for counter top receptacles ( small appliance branch circuits ) .
If it's not possible to run a dedicated circuit to the studio area of OP's house, maybe the offending kitchen circuits can be re-worked. Of course, this is all moot if the wiring in the home is already up-to-date.
The in-rush current probably won't affect smaller loads like TVs, comps, etc, because they use less current anyway. The amps in the studio monitors ( any power amp ) use more current so are more likely to be starved when something else is running on the same line. Are the amps in the new monitors bigger than the old? HTH
Sounds like solid reasoning to me.

One other thing that might seem counter-intuitive for a few moments upon first consideration is that, in many homes, many individual rooms may be serviced by more than one breaker circuit. The reason is fairly easy to understand on further thought: it's easier and therefore cheaper to run the same breaker circuit to outlets on both sides of a given interior wall, while outlets on (both sides of) another wall in the same room may well be served by a different panel circuit.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #16
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
Sounds like solid reasoning to me.

One other thing that might seem counter-intuitive for a few moments upon first consideration is that, in many homes, many individual rooms may be serviced by more than one breaker circuit. The reason is fairly easy to understand on further thought: it's easier and therefore cheaper to run the same breaker circuit to outlets on both sides of a given interior wall, while outlets on (both sides of) another wall in the same room may well be served by a different panel circuit.
especially if the builder's brother-in-law did the wiring.
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