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Starting a mix studio for $4-5k? Studio Monitors
Old 30th December 2010
  #1
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u2bonoman's Avatar
 

Starting a mix studio for $4-5k?

How would one (one being me) go about doing this? How would you spend $4-5k appropriately for starting a mixing studio? Already have the computer, as well as Sonar, but I'm sure I'd need to get an LE version of Pro Tools before I'd get clients. Already have a treated room as well.
Old 30th December 2010
  #2
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BradLyons's Avatar
 

I love ProTools, it's what I use and prefer as an engineer---but I won't say that you have to get it. What matters is that you have the tools you need and you know how to use them. Sonar is a perfectly capable program. Please tell us what you have now in your studio----be as detailed as possible, that will help those such as myself understand what you have and what you need to get to where you are going.
Old 30th December 2010
  #3
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u2bonoman's Avatar
 

Thanks - well as stated, I have Sonar 8.3.1 , as well as the following plugs:

Softube CL1b
Softube Fet
Waves Gold
Sonnox Oxford Limiter
Antares Autotune
Colortone

I've got KRK Rokit 5 monitors, and a Tascam US-1641 audio interface. Also have various mics and such but they won't help during mixing so I won't list them.

I know it would probably be nice to have hardware comps and EQs but for this amount of money, I'm expecting to be putting more into monitors/conversion. And we all gotta start somewhere I guess.
Old 30th December 2010
  #4
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steveschizoid's Avatar
$5000 really is not much in this game. Do you intend to stay ITB? If so, that will keep your cost, as well as your attainable quality, lower than otherwise. You won't really need to worry about your conversion until you are sending signals OTB. A set of Focals, UAD quad plus plug ins, and perhaps some slate Digital plugs might be a good place to start. I'd go with the Native PT the next time you need to upgrade, but use Sonar until then. You will attract clients based on the results you achieve vs. the price you charge - which DAW you use really doesn't enter in the equation except to the extent that people want to give you PT files to mix.

People will want your work to sound every bit as good as "commercial" recordings, while paying you next to nothing - and to make matters worse, you will have no control over the quality of the tracks you get to mix. Good luck.
Old 30th December 2010
  #5
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NF Audio's Avatar
I would consider acquiring a few select, high quality pieces of outboard gear... maybe a used pair of distressors or something but that's just me.

Also, being a mix only studio, you'll want to be able to accept pro tools files, in my opinion, so yes as you mention, maybe buying pro tools 9 would be a wise investment.

Biggest piece of advice: Get a few very good things and learn to use them to their absolute best, rather than a whole giant bunch of average gear.

Best of luck.

NF.
Old 30th December 2010
  #6
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BradLyons's Avatar
 

Nice outboard gear, Focals, a UAD2, etc and all of that is great----but let's first figure out what his market is. Maybe he's mixing just local kids doing basic recordings, or perhaps he's trying to start a new market, possibly there's some serious studios and he's trying to offer a more affordable alternative. Before we can recommend gear we need to understand what is there, what the goals are, and what he wants to achieve.

SO.... are you wanting to mix bands? If so, locally or just whomever contacts you? Are you looking to do demos, track them then mix? What do you want to make an hour, do you think you'll get what you want, etc? What's brought you to this decision to upgrade and why now?

These are questions that might seem crazy----or off the wall, but they are THE KEY to understanding where you're going and why, as well as what you need. You don't need the best stuff to get work, you just need what's needed to get and do the work---do it right, make some money, and then you can worry about getting that stuff later. NOW if the decision is you want to hit this hard and heavy, you want to have a killer studio to really wow everyone then we're talking $20k+ easily. It doesn't sound as if that's what you're trying to do, yes?
Old 30th December 2010
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NF Audio View Post
I would consider acquiring a few select, high quality pieces of outboard gear... maybe a used pair of distressors or something but that's just me.
That's a great way to lose a big heap of cash buying things that your clients probably won't be able to tell the difference with or without.

I mean, at $4-5k, there's no point buying stuff just to go on the kit list. Because you're not going to have a very good kit list anyway. So you're better buying the essentials to actually get good mixes coming out of the studio on a regular basis. This doesn't mean distressors to lose half your budget on! This does mean:
• Good, fast, solid computer; with separate system and audio drives + backup.
•*Good, solid DAW with reliable and solid hardware.
• A pleasant and comfortable working environment, that sounds good (acoustically), looks good (IE paint, lighting) feels good (air con, mood lighting etc) and is secure. You are going to spend a lot of time in there.
•*Good, strong and comfortable working furniture. This goes from a comfortable chair, to a decent desk with the keyboard and mouse at a healthy working height, with the equipment in positions where you can easily use it without it becoming in the way.
• Reliable monitoring - in the form of your chosen studio monitors (choose based on your room size, your budget, and your favourite sounding set. Don't just go 'Focal Twins' because 3 people on here who don't own them say so); placed on appropriate stands / pads etc; a good pair of headphones, and a reference system - this could be a Sony boom box or something, need not be special.
•*Safe and Effective Electrical - surge protected sockets, good cabling throughout the system with good connectors, isolate everything from the earth (or earth it where required).

BEFORE you even start thinking about what gear you want. Many members of this forum will have better gear, shoved in a horrible sounding room that they hate spending their time in, and have to shove a book in the door to let a draught in in the summer. You would be surprised at how much your mixes will be affected if simply walking into the studio in the morning is getting you down before you even open the first file (because they ALWAYS get you down. You will NEVER open a session that doesn't have SOMETHING wrong with it).

Right, now that your personal stuff is done, we need to go to commercial.

First thing you need to do is IDENTIFY YOUR MARKET.

What are your strong points? Is your experience so far in recording 72-piece string orchestras, or 3-piece punk rockers? Work out your main audience based on your skills, and your enjoyment, and stick with it. That could be 1-genre specific, or more. It's up to you. But work it out, and write it down early. Then stick it up somewhere you can see it. So before pressing the 'Checkout' button on any online store, you can read it and ask yourself 'does what I'm buying fit that market?' If the answer is no - hit the back button!

Once you've put aside some budget to work in a good-sounding, comfortable, safe and reliable workspace; and figured out your target audience, next stop is:
• Website - Get a good website and pay some college student to fill it with stuff for you.
•*Twitter, Blog, Facebook, MySpace, etc. Get your presence up on the web, and start attacking your target audience with carpet bombs of news, special offers and stuff. Get a buzz going.
• Business Cards - you will get a huge amount of your work through meeting people in person. Swapping numbers will often result in them having a 'Rob' in their phone book who they have no idea of the true identity of. A simple, memorable, attractive business card is a far more effective option.
•*Contract - get a contract written up with somebody who knows what they are talking about. This prevents you later getting screwed in the butt by some arsehole band.
• Graphic Set - before finishing the above, you will need a PROPERLY DONE (not MS Word!) graphic set - a logo, font set, colour scheme etc. This can go on all of your documents (business card, website, social networking, invoices etc) and grow your corporate identity.

There is no point in buying gear before you do this. Why? A pair of distressor's does naff all good if there's no music to use it on. If you want a regular stream of music to put through your $5k of investments, you need to do all of the above to ensure that you're on top of the game. A lot of studios and engineers haven't done this, get ahead of the game whilst you have the chance!

Now, you've got a nice work space, a market, a corporate identity and marketing products. Before you carry on, make sure it's all legal. Get on the tax roll, become a proper company, and make sure you're all legit. I'm not familiar with the US System, but in the UK, it's register self-employed, register self-assessed, and you're going.

Once you're legit, get insured. That's gear insurance at the very least. Business insurance preferable. And if you've got clients in the studio, Public Liability insurance, so if a piece of 80s outboard electrocutes a client, you can pay their hospital bill.

Now that you've got a nice workspace, a market, a corporate identity, you're operating legitimately, and have insurance, start thinking about equipment. But I have a feeling you'll be low on funds. So crack on with what you got, there's no reason with that kit you can't be churning out good mixes in no time. Get some clients, get some good CV stuff, and do it right, you'll have a good set of clients coming through the studio on a regular basis - and you can use THAT money to buy the fancy gear people talk about on here.

But I can guarantee you one thing - EVERYTHING I've written on this page will get you more money than buying UAD cards, distressors or Pro Tools. And I'm not trying to say it's all about the money, but you didn't think that Abbey Road got it's numerous SSLs and Neves, and buckets full of U87s (chucked in like most studios have 57s) from it's startup money did you?

This is a pretty basic outline. If you're serious about this, drop me a line, and we can talk about putting aside a little bit of that cash into my bank account, and I'll sit down and do it properly, and we can get your studio rolling.
Old 30th December 2010
  #8
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NF Audio's Avatar
Big heavy boxes with knobs on them sounds more fun than all that

Quote:
Originally Posted by therealbigd View Post
That's a great way to lose a big heap of cash buying things that your clients probably won't be able to tell the difference with or without.

I mean, at $4-5k, there's no point buying stuff just to go on the kit list. Because you're not going to have a very good kit list anyway. So you're better buying the essentials to actually get good mixes coming out of the studio on a regular basis. This doesn't mean distressors to lose half your budget on! This does mean:
• Good, fast, solid computer; with separate system and audio drives + backup.
•*Good, solid DAW with reliable and solid hardware.
• A pleasant and comfortable working environment, that sounds good (acoustically), looks good (IE paint, lighting) feels good (air con, mood lighting etc) and is secure. You are going to spend a lot of time in there.
•*Good, strong and comfortable working furniture. This goes from a comfortable chair, to a decent desk with the keyboard and mouse at a healthy working height, with the equipment in positions where you can easily use it without it becoming in the way.
• Reliable monitoring - in the form of your chosen studio monitors (choose based on your room size, your budget, and your favourite sounding set. Don't just go 'Focal Twins' because 3 people on here who don't own them say so); placed on appropriate stands / pads etc; a good pair of headphones, and a reference system - this could be a Sony boom box or something, need not be special.
•*Safe and Effective Electrical - surge protected sockets, good cabling throughout the system with good connectors, isolate everything from the earth (or earth it where required).

BEFORE you even start thinking about what gear you want. Many members of this forum will have better gear, shoved in a horrible sounding room that they hate spending their time in, and have to shove a book in the door to let a draught in in the summer. You would be surprised at how much your mixes will be affected if simply walking into the studio in the morning is getting you down before you even open the first file (because they ALWAYS get you down. You will NEVER open a session that doesn't have SOMETHING wrong with it).

Right, now that your personal stuff is done, we need to go to commercial.

First thing you need to do is IDENTIFY YOUR MARKET.

What are your strong points? Is your experience so far in recording 72-piece string orchestras, or 3-piece punk rockers? Work out your main audience based on your skills, and your enjoyment, and stick with it. That could be 1-genre specific, or more. It's up to you. But work it out, and write it down early. Then stick it up somewhere you can see it. So before pressing the 'Checkout' button on any online store, you can read it and ask yourself 'does what I'm buying fit that market?' If the answer is no - hit the back button!

Once you've put aside some budget to work in a good-sounding, comfortable, safe and reliable workspace; and figured out your target audience, next stop is:
• Website - Get a good website and pay some college student to fill it with stuff for you.
•*Twitter, Blog, Facebook, MySpace, etc. Get your presence up on the web, and start attacking your target audience with carpet bombs of news, special offers and stuff. Get a buzz going.
• Business Cards - you will get a huge amount of your work through meeting people in person. Swapping numbers will often result in them having a 'Rob' in their phone book who they have no idea of the true identity of. A simple, memorable, attractive business card is a far more effective option.
•*Contract - get a contract written up with somebody who knows what they are talking about. This prevents you later getting screwed in the butt by some arsehole band.
• Graphic Set - before finishing the above, you will need a PROPERLY DONE (not MS Word!) graphic set - a logo, font set, colour scheme etc. This can go on all of your documents (business card, website, social networking, invoices etc) and grow your corporate identity.

There is no point in buying gear before you do this. Why? A pair of distressor's does naff all good if there's no music to use it on. If you want a regular stream of music to put through your $5k of investments, you need to do all of the above to ensure that you're on top of the game. A lot of studios and engineers haven't done this, get ahead of the game whilst you have the chance!

Now, you've got a nice work space, a market, a corporate identity and marketing products. Before you carry on, make sure it's all legal. Get on the tax roll, become a proper company, and make sure you're all legit. I'm not familiar with the US System, but in the UK, it's register self-employed, register self-assessed, and you're going.

Once you're legit, get insured. That's gear insurance at the very least. Business insurance preferable. And if you've got clients in the studio, Public Liability insurance, so if a piece of 80s outboard electrocutes a client, you can pay their hospital bill.

Now that you've got a nice workspace, a market, a corporate identity, you're operating legitimately, and have insurance, start thinking about equipment. But I have a feeling you'll be low on funds. So crack on with what you got, there's no reason with that kit you can't be churning out good mixes in no time. Get some clients, get some good CV stuff, and do it right, you'll have a good set of clients coming through the studio on a regular basis - and you can use THAT money to buy the fancy gear people talk about on here.

But I can guarantee you one thing - EVERYTHING I've written on this page will get you more money than buying UAD cards, distressors or Pro Tools. And I'm not trying to say it's all about the money, but you didn't think that Abbey Road got it's numerous SSLs and Neves, and buckets full of U87s (chucked in like most studios have 57s) from it's startup money did you?

This is a pretty basic outline. If you're serious about this, drop me a line, and we can talk about putting aside a little bit of that cash into my bank account, and I'll sit down and do it properly, and we can get your studio rolling.
Old 30th December 2010
  #9
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NF Audio View Post
Big heavy boxes with knobs on them sounds more fun than all that
Probably is.

But setup, operate, and market a studio properly, and you'll be able to get more big heavy boxes with knobs on them, than you can with $4-5k.
Old 30th December 2010
  #10
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NF Audio's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by therealbigd View Post
Probably is.

But setup, operate, and market a studio properly, and you'll be able to get more big heavy boxes with knobs on them, than you can with $4-5k.
Hahaha yeah I know... I'm just playin'
Old 30th December 2010
  #11
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NF Audio's Avatar
OH WAIT! You might wanna get some speakers!
Old 30th December 2010
  #12
Gear Maniac
 

going itb is probably your best bet for the money
start off with
some better monitors $2,500 pair
Auralex SpeakerDude HD

Isolation Pads for Speakers, Computers, or Other Home Electronic $80.00 4for a pair

and a dangerous d-box good for the great d/a converters,summing possiblies, and monitoring $1,400

use stock plugs and
Waves Renaissance Maxx TDM Renaissance Maxx Bundle Including 7 Audio Processing Plug-Ins - TDM $600

make money off your business then buy UAD Omni package

now pro tools do this

Digidesign Mbox 2 Micro $250.00

USB Audio Interface with Pro Tools LE Software - 24-bit/48kHz USB Playback Interface

The Digidesign Mbox 2 Micro answers the demands of Pro Tools users worldwide by offering a way to edit and mix with Pro Tools LE anywhere you go! That's right, this USB device that's about the same size as a common jump drive allows you to take your Pro Tools Sessions on the road — record on your HD or LE rig and use the Mbox 2 Micro to mix on a laptop while riding in a plane, in the park... anywhere you want. The Mbox 2 Micro is portable Pro Tools power!
you'll be able to mix pt sessions without investing heavy into the pro tools world!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

that's around $4,800 once shipping/cords etc...


$200 for making your room more comfortable

add outboard gear as money comes
I don't have anything to suggest besides a colored compressor
Old 30th December 2010
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by u2bonoman View Post
How would one (one being me) go about doing this? How would you spend $4-5k appropriately for starting a mixing studio? .
Hire the best publicist or agent you can that has connections with the majors for that money. Offer them a cut off every mixing job they bring you.

No amount of gear or plug ins is going to bring in the clients with the songs that really matter for breaking a mix engineers career. You need those connects or you will be another one of thousands offering their mixing services on Craiglist that no one really pays attention to or cares about unfortunately.
Old 30th December 2010
  #14
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uncle duncan's Avatar
 

Did anyone mention a couch? I'd spend four grand on a nice couch, and whatever's left on Slate drum replacement software and samples. These are the only things your clients will notice, or care about.
Old 30th December 2010
  #15
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AnthonyRochester's Avatar
 

therealbigd - great post
Old 30th December 2010
  #16
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YOHAMI's Avatar
 

this is how I would burn the cash:

Interface & daw $600: Steinberg MR861x for the audio interface, comes with cubase ai (more than fine as a DAW)

Steinberg MR 816 X MR816X FireWire Audio Interface DSP - eBay (item 390270605982 end time Jan-08-11 12:25:53 PST)

Plugins $1600: UAD 2 solo / quad. Work with the trials, extend them, then buy the whole set. This one has $3000 in plugins included

Universal Audio UAD 2 Solo PCIe with $3,000 in plugins - eBay (item 330511385662 end time Jan-22-11 18:00:37 PST)

or

UNIVERSAL AUDIO UAD2QUAD UAD-2 QUAD - eBay (item 120659262887 end time Jan-10-11 10:44:56 PST)

Nebula is a way cheaper option, but also more tedious.

http://www.acustica-audio.com/

Summing / monitoring $1240: Dangerous Bbox, summing plus monitoring, cool

Dangerous Music D-Box Monitoring System & Summing Mixer - eBay (item 370468816999 end time Jan-21-11 08:52:27 PST)

Speakers $700: Focal CMS 40 (best for the price, if you want to extend here -> cms 50 or 65 are cool, and more expensive )

FOCAL CMS40 STUDIO MONITORS PAIR - eBay (item 330511484366 end time Jan-22-11 09:01:31 PST)

Acoustics $900: KRK Ergo ($300) + 2x Realtraps mondotraps ( $300 each )

KRK ERGO STUDIO ROOM ANALYSIS & CORRECTION SYSTEM - eBay (item 370468694301 end time Jan-20-11 20:10:51 PST)

http://www.realtraps.com/prices.htm

Total: $5k

-----------

You could cut corners from the plugins (use nebula), or ditch the audio interface / summing and stick to an mbox (horrible), so you can improve other areas, but thats my 2 cents.
Old 30th December 2010
  #17
Lives for gear
There is one question that will lead you all the answers you want.

"Why should anyone pay to use my 5K mix studio when they probably have that much or more invested in their own home studio"

The only answer that will make sense is" because my mixes sound better than theirs.

So what would that be? 1) because your room is more truthful than theirs. This includes treatment and monitors. 2) Because you know your room and gear and can make a better mix than they can. 3) That the gear plugs and gear you choose allow you to do number 2.

Of course the other question is whose mix do you have to beat. A critical question.

I don't know if you can do this for 5k.. Many will say absolutely not. But I'm not so sure. There are an awful lot of home people that can't mix at all.
If you are better than they are, you might be able to generate business.

I doubt you will be putting tony Maserati or Jack Joseph Puig out on the streets, but it really comes down to your own talent. If you happen to mix something that becomes regionaly popular, you could find yourself swamped.

For my money I would add one go to stereo comp, and a UAD card, the biggest you can afford. I think UAD plugs are real game changers.

Put the rest into monitors and treatment, a great coffee maker and couch.

Then market your self as a specialist, don't try to be everyone.....focus on your goal. There is a lot of local business you can get if the product is right, and the price is right.
Old 30th December 2010
  #18
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AnthonyRochester's Avatar
 

He said he already has a treated room. Even if the existing treatment is no good and needs to be redone or more is needed, you can save a lot of money if you build your own absorption panels. But it doesn't need $900 in the budget for it.
Old 30th December 2010
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beebay007 View Post
He said he already has a treated room. Even if the existing treatment is no good and needs to be redone or more is needed, you can save a lot of money if you build your own absorption panels. But it doesn't need $900 in the budget for it.
It might.

Treated by whom? I'm just saying that the fastest way for a start up like this to fail is to turn out stuff that doesn't translate. A couple if iffy mixes and word gets out. You're gone.
Old 30th December 2010
  #20
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AnthonyRochester's Avatar
 

Yes but if you do some reading and are a little handy, it isn't that hard to make your own very effective room treatment for not a lot of money.
Old 30th December 2010
  #21
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yeah.. I guess my feeling is... where I'd start is with the question of where you're at in your mixing... like never mind what gear you got.. just how good are you.

From there look at the market analysis stuff.. cause I mean how good you are is going to effect how you can position your self or try and position your self.

But I mean like.. depending on how good you are.. well I mean if you're skill / knowledge / talent is really on the just starting out kinda level? I don't know how much sense it makes to spend a lot of money on marketing materials or to spend a lot of time trying to get a lot of attention for your self.

When I'm on that level with something I usually try and be kinda low key about myself.. I network, connect, tell people what I do.. talk to them about what they are doing.. and it's usually just the conversation that's my marketing really...

At that point.. I'm just trying to work on relationship building.. and.. well I mean...

Well one thing I might do is to try and build relationships with folks who do artist management.. or if there's any local indie labels or..

I mean the cost of getting new clients is more then maintaing older clients.. So.. if you build relationships.. with people in a position to get you work.. well that's how I usually do it... and.. it's more about the relationships then the work..

So like.. you can be not great.. offer someone a service.. that's better then what they could have gotten at that budget.. and use that as an opportunity to hone your kinda.. how you manage the client stuff.. as well as your work.. and whatever.. and sorta use this as a place to build a foundation for your future.

Well....

Hmm...

Looking at your gear..

You know I would say.. monitors and acoustic treatment is probably where I would spend money first.. gear wise.

For 5k I have an all most knee jerk reaction to say "UAD Omni," but if you need to spend money on monitors and acoustic treatment.. well there's probably not that much money left.

So I guess the question then becomes "what's good and cheap?"

I'm trying to think...

Well.. so some stuff to look at...

It looks like you don't have anything going on reverb wise.. other then what comes with Sonar.. and I'm not up on what comes with Sonar... oh.. and the Waves Gold stuff.

The thing is that reverb is just so important.. and the reverbs found in waves gold are.. well.. I can dig them.. but I wouldn't want to be limited to them.

So.. I'd at least look at altiverb.. kinda a no brainer..
Um.. You know.. I really like the IK multimedia reverb stuff..

I'm a big fan of Liquid Mix.. and that's real cheap these days... gives you a nice EQ / Compressor library basically.. it's a little out of control...

Also PSP offers some cheap bundles that I think are quite good..

As far as out board.. I think you can really only look at really cheap out board.. and I don't know anything about that.. I would augment you're software EQ and Compression options.. before I went to out board.. and even when I went to out board..

That may be a style of work thing though.. like I prefer to have lots of instances.. that I can adjust and automate as a part of my mix..

And.. my impression.. and maybe people can help cure me of this.. but that if you have $X to spend.. and it's a choice between software and hardware.. it's going to go further in software.. and.. as much as we can say hardware is better.. I'm not always sure it's better if we are looking at it from the perspective of.. "what can I get for $X."

So another words.. if cheap hardware costs as much as pretty nice software.. the software might be the better option.

Umm....

For marketing materials.. I'd just go with a wordpress site? I'd say go self hosting.. all the social media marketing stuff is free anyway.. and a wordpress site is.. well if you're self hosting.. there's the cost of that and maybe a premium theme.. or you can just find a free theme and kinda customize it a little...

decent branding / visual identity / and here's a business card thrown in.. is probably more then $2k. You're working with so little money.. I mean I know a lot of people who are able to start a business without branding / visual identity stuff.. maybe you're logo is like a head shot or something..

(and mind you I'm telling you this and I have a design background)

I mean I think reputation is the big thing.. and.. are you in a position.. with how good you are.. to make a great reputation for your self? I think of packaging and marketing efforts as like.. ways of optimizing reputation building.. but like.. nothing kills a bad product faster then great marketing.

But relationships are like PR.. like a doctor who has a great bedside manner.. he's a lot less likely to get sued for malpractice then the doctor who's maybe a little bit better.. but who's bed side manner is iffy.. So relationships are like pro-active in terms of dealing with bumps in the road.. if I'm explaining this right....
Old 30th December 2010
  #22
Gear Maniac
 
LirvA's Avatar
 

ITB/OTB = in the box/out the box?
Old 30th December 2010
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LirvA View Post
ITB/OTB = in the box/out the box?
yes?
Old 30th December 2010
  #24
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I wouldnt build this place and think youl be in business. I would build it and know that you are taking the first step towards that goal
Old 30th December 2010
  #25
Gear Maniac
 
LirvA's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattsearles View Post
yes?

Sorry I'm a newb ...
Old 30th December 2010
  #26
gear will not get you clients.

update list for you:
1. monitors
2. converters
3. adjust reoom treatment

stay in the box as long as you can. 4 to 5k is not much. don't buy cheap stuff (except if it's good).
Old 30th December 2010
  #27
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I would get on ebay and spend every cent of it on a nice recording console. If your going to record to daw I would get buy the best converts available then save up till I had about 4 to 5 grand again and get on ebay and spend every cent of it on a nice recording console.
Old 30th December 2010
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LirvA View Post
Sorry I'm a newb ...
lol, thats ok.. i understand.


Quote:
Originally Posted by George Necola View Post
gear will not get you clients.

update list for you:
1. monitors
2. converters
3. adjust reoom treatment

stay in the box as long as you can. 4 to 5k is not much. don't buy cheap stuff (except if it's good).
I knew there was a better way of saying that.. the don't buy cheap unless its good part.

You'd put converters high on that list? I know that tascam interface makes me a little nervous but.. but #1 if you really minimize how much you go in and out of the box... and even more so if #2 you dont got no out board anyway.. then really the only thing is the D/A to the monitors.. and in that budget.. I can't imagine worrying about that..


Quote:
Originally Posted by Beefy View Post
I would get on ebay and spend every cent of it on a nice recording console. If your going to record to daw I would get buy the best converts available then save up till I had about 4 to 5 grand again and get on ebay and spend every cent of it on a nice recording console.
That's an awesome idea!
Old 30th December 2010
  #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattsearles View Post
lol, thats ok.. i understand.

I knew there was a better way of saying that.. the don't buy cheap unless its good part.

You'd put converters high on that list? I know that tascam interface makes me a little nervous but.. but #1 if you really minimize how much you go in and out of the box... and even more so if #2 you dont got no out board anyway.. then really the only thing is the D/A to the monitors.. and in that budget.. I can't imagine worrying about that..
yes. converters are damned important. if gets a new pair of real monitors/new converters adjust his hearing to this, he can work on the room more (treatment).
Old 30th December 2010
  #30
Gear Nut
 

Get drum replacement like Drumagog and build a drum sample library such as Steven Slate Samples. I've found that even replacing an ok kick alone and making the velocities similar for all can pull a whole song together. Besides that I'd probably upgrade your converters just so you'll have the option of outboard gear and so you can start collecting gear. I'd also get a good amp so you can re-amp clients guitars.
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