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Studio Gear Back in the 80's Reverb/Delay Processors (HW)
Old 28th December 2010
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paultools View Post
not to be a d1ck, but google really is your friend sometimes.
When I was getting started, I scoured every library and bookstore for any morsel of printed information I could find, and there wasn't much (then Runstein and Worman books, although db and RE/P mags were GREAT!).
They are speakers. I googled. I would not have had to if you would have answered instead of emphasizing us all how you are not a d1ck.
Old 28th December 2010
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoaT View Post
They are speakers. I googled. I would not have had to if you would have answered instead of emphasizing us all how you are not a d1ck.
If that's all you got out of that, then I wish you the best.
Old 28th December 2010
  #33
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Talent, analog tape, real consoles, no ITB ****e like today.
Old 28th December 2010
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Studer View Post
- Tape machines : Studer, MCI, Ampex...
You may also find that many of the recordings of that era were tracked on Stephens and 3M machines.

Cheers,

Otto
Old 28th December 2010
  #35
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Haha, i'm sure if ITB was around then, they still would've made really good albums...but Talent was definitely apart of it...back before autotune and quantising...things people rely on nowadays...and their overuse has all but killed music...
Old 28th December 2010
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher View Post

- as opposed to downloading the "singles" from iTunes [Steven Tyler a judge on American Idol? - just shoot me now]
You know thats all about the money, like he needs it ?, he even said lay the money on the table or I'm out.
If I were in his shoes I still would not have took the job, he must be bored.
Old 28th December 2010
  #37
I think studio construction should get a mention. If they weren't brand new (rare) then they were 'legacy' constructions or "old buildings".

That sort of uber solid construction for the most part has died out..

I remember in the noughties (2000) era - when one studio (Nomis) decided to knock down the studio on the top floor of its building to make room for more office space (a SSL studio with a great sounding control room) it took them THREE times longer to knock down than they thought - because it was built so solidly!
Old 28th December 2010
  #38
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Last year of the 80s, I was involved in what I think was a pretty standard small studio for the time. 16 track Otari 1 inch tape recorder, 24 track Soundcraft console, about 12 outboards, and a well-built room with 4 separate monitor mixes.

Most of all, the mindset was different then. Recording music was separate from making music, at least around me. Making music was composing or performing live, but recording was whole different thing. Recording the music back then, was much more an act of recording what you did, than today, where "making music" is more of an editing art. You had limited resources and you always had to organize the work ahead of time. Recoding was a serious thing, and people got real weary whenever any sign of potential weakness in the planning or personnel was probable.

No matter what gear you had, even in a huge studio, the mixdown was always a process of pushing the limits of what the gear in question could do, or was supposed to do. You did mutes/unmutes of channels in real-time during mixdown, as well as slight knob tweaks and fader rides. If you messed it up, you had to do it again. Also, you had the lovely tape compression; if a signal went too hot for a moment, you usually didn't get distortion, but a heavy compression instead. One classic was the overpriced Bantam patch bays. In our case it was built-in to the console. Made the right end of the mixer look like a damn crow's nest by mixdown.

Punching in was possible. Some used the timecode on the tape. We had 9 instant recall buttons on the tape remote. Whenever you pressed one of them the tape winded to whatever time on the tape was designated to that button. This time, was also used for punch-in and out. Although most of the time, you just hit the record button by hand, praying you didn't hit it too early (meaning you'd overwrite what was on that track before the punch-in point). Whatever got down on tape, you had to work with. Whenever the drummer did his take, and he wasn't a seasoned pro, there was always an air of 'holding your breath' in the control room - praying. Punching in drums was real difficult, due to all the tails that drums produces. Punch in too early, and you'd cut the tail of a tom or a cymbal. In fact, you often did overwrite the previous tail; you just had to hit the very right millisecond to not make the overwrite noticeable.

Synths, was either played by hand, or in some cases sequenced. The sequencer - usually cubase on atari over here - was synced to the tape using a horrible sounding audio signal called SMPTE. This signal was recorded onto track 16 of the tape, and each time you played the tape you sent that channel into an interface connected to the computer. This enabled the computer to run the sequenced song in parallel to the tape. The tape didn't use bars and subdivisions obviously, but 2mins 13 secs on the tape was 2 mins 13 secs on the sequence as well. It worked 90% of the time. In our case, the SMPTE signal - which had to be recorded real hot - usually bled over to chan 15 on the tape, sometimes even to chan 14. Whenever the computer was to be used, we only had 14 tracks of tape.

Today, there are such incredible alternatives, improvement- and rescue options. Back then, there were no such rescues. Whatever you got down on tape was it; you had very few ways of cheating or concealing. Therefore, the mindset was alot more serious, and preparations were alot more careful. Recording music, was serious business, because nobody wanted to look/sound like a fool - not the engineer, not the musicians. Whenever a mix was done, it was done, and it was unrecallable.
Old 28th December 2010
  #39
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Studer's Avatar
 

Thanks all ! Very interesting answers !

Which microphones were used on the drums, piano, vocals, and with wich preamps ?

Thanks !
Old 28th December 2010
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Studer View Post
Which microphones were used on the drums, piano, vocals, and with wich preamps ?
That's alot. One thing that can be said is, that 90% of todays classic mics, were classics back in the 80s too. Most mics that was used then is still used today, because they are and were workhorses. The 80s sound resides more in the instrument sounds/signal chains/tape, than mics. Regarding preamps, I'd say the available console preamps was used more back then than now, unless perhaps the top 10% high profile productions. The 80s were the heyday of both SSL and Neve.

Native Instruments recently released a sampled drums package called "Abbey Road 80s Drums"; they really do sound very 80s. Perhaps you can find some leisure guiding from reading about how they did it. There's a video on the product site.
Old 28th December 2010
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor View Post
Outboard-Pultecs, DBX 160, LA2A,LA3a,1176, AMS 1580 and RMX16,Lexicon 224,Ursa Space Station,H910 and 949.

Consoles-API,MCI,Neve,Trident,SSL
Recorders-Ampex,MCI,Studer
Microphones-Usual suspects

Techniques-Take best drum parts on tape(4-8 bars with 4 on the floor kick), cut them into small pieces, splice them together and record it a whole bunch of times on tape till you have a consistent 3-4 minutes for song. Play parts on top of that(bass, gtrs, strings, percussion) and do the same. Lay vocals on top. Mix and your good. 70's

In the late 70's and early 80's the TR-808 became popular in studios in NYC and dance and hiphop songs were used on them. It brought the end of using live drums on dance music and ushered in the machine era.
You mean early 80's right? The TR808 wasn't introduced by Roland until late 1980 based on my research on it's history. But yeah, it was definitely used a lot throughout the 80's and helped pave the way for a new era of music, especially hip-hop, modern r&b, and dance.
Old 28th December 2010
  #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sk106 View Post
Last year of the 80s, I was involved in what I think was a pretty standard small studio for the time. 16 track Otari 1 inch tape recorder, 24 track Soundcraft console, about 12 outboards, and a well-built room with 4 separate monitor mixes.

Most of all, the mindset was different then. Recording music was separate from making music, at least around me. Making music was composing or performing live, but recording was whole different thing. Recording the music back then, was much more an act of recording what you did, than today, where "making music" is more of an editing art. You had limited resources and you always had to organize the work ahead of time. Recoding was a serious thing, and people got real weary whenever any sign of potential weakness in the planning or personnel was probable.

No matter what gear you had, even in a huge studio, the mixdown was always a process of pushing the limits of what the gear in question could do, or was supposed to do. You did mutes/unmutes of channels in real-time during mixdown, as well as slight knob tweaks and fader rides. If you messed it up, you had to do it again. Also, you had the lovely tape compression; if a signal went too hot for a moment, you usually didn't get distortion, but a heavy compression instead. One classic was the overpriced Bantam patch bays. In our case it was built-in to the console. Made the right end of the mixer look like a damn crow's nest by mixdown.

Punching in was possible. Some used the timecode on the tape. We had 9 instant recall buttons on the tape remote. Whenever you pressed one of them the tape winded to whatever time on the tape was designated to that button. This time, was also used for punch-in and out. Although most of the time, you just hit the record button by hand, praying you didn't hit it too early (meaning you'd overwrite what was on that track before the punch-in point). Whatever got down on tape, you had to work with. Whenever the drummer did his take, and he wasn't a seasoned pro, there was always an air of 'holding your breath' in the control room - praying. Punching in drums was real difficult, due to all the tails that drums produces. Punch in too early, and you'd cut the tail of a tom or a cymbal. In fact, you often did overwrite the previous tail; you just had to hit the very right millisecond to not make the overwrite noticeable.

Synths, was either played by hand, or in some cases sequenced. The sequencer - usually cubase on atari over here - was synced to the tape using a horrible sounding audio signal called SMPTE. This signal was recorded onto track 16 of the tape, and each time you played the tape you sent that channel into an interface connected to the computer. This enabled the computer to run the sequenced song in parallel to the tape. The tape didn't use bars and subdivisions obviously, but 2mins 13 secs on the tape was 2 mins 13 secs on the sequence as well. It worked 90% of the time. In our case, the SMPTE signal - which had to be recorded real hot - usually bled over to chan 15 on the tape, sometimes even to chan 14. Whenever the computer was to be used, we only had 14 tracks of tape.

Today, there are such incredible alternatives, improvement- and rescue options. Back then, there were no such rescues. Whatever you got down on tape was it; you had very few ways of cheating or concealing. Therefore, the mindset was alot more serious, and preparations were alot more careful. Recording music, was serious business, because nobody wanted to look/sound like a fool - not the engineer, not the musicians. Whenever a mix was done, it was done, and it was unrecallable.
" Hey, which numbskull came in here over the weekend and removed all the cables on the patchbays for the mix I've been working on for the past 3 weeks?"

Let's see ... 78-82 .....if you were in the game at that moment and had been in the game already for ten or more years, the stress was high. Things were not easier now, but different. With a whole load of new stress. Not least of which was ...THIS SOUND OFF THE TAPE HEADS IS GETTING WORSE AND WORSE AFTER THE 100TH PLAYBACK TO MAKE THE MIX. CLEANING THE HEADS ETC WERE OF NO HELP BECAUSE THE FACT WAS, THE TAPES WOULD WEAR AFTER THAT MANY PLAYS. YOU KNEW YOU HAD TO GET THIS MIX DONE BEFORE THE TAPE COMPLETELY LOST ITS HIGHS. But that didn't always happen and the mix often was never what you had hoped it would be.

The days were not days in analog heaven. They were rough in one or more ways all the time. We all knew there had to be a better way. Somebody's gotta invent something. This magnetic tape thing is just not making it. It's changing my sound too much compared to what I put in through the mics a few days ago. This is not good. Not acceptable. Not good.

Rooms. I like the ones made by that Rudy whats-his-name that were completely dead. Perfect for a time there. I think he personally built 50000000 thousand of those rooms. I also liked the Al Green studio that had all the mattresses on the walls for treatment. The gobos were mattresses too I think. Those were unusual. Wouldn't want those now. But they do fit when you want that sound.

Autotune ... was there. It was called... devote one of the synchronized 24 tracks to just the lead vocal. Record word by word by word if you have to ...if you're going for the absolute perfect vocal track. No punch-in required. Just 23 tracks of lead vocal, line by line, word by word, doubled, tripled etc. Dump all that as a submix to one track of the main 24 track and then put the vocal 2" away in case it's needed next week when we change our minds on the lead vocal mix. I can tell you some incredible stories about that from Criteria Miami and my visits there. Autotune of the 70's and 80's.

Align to grid? It was called a metronome and a bazillion takes to line up with it for those that clinical. Been there, done that. All of which wore the tape out more. Not good. This magnetic tape limitation has got to go. Got to go. Why doesn't someone hurry up and save we engineers from this nightmare called tape ??????? It was becoming an almost unanimous call for help as I remember.

In 1976 at the Waldorf Astoria NY AES , I saw what many of use thought was the lifesaver of the future. The 3m 32-track digital machine unveiled. And all its followup inventions for the next 9 years. Digital. A journey unto itself.

And then all you kids were born. And you all want to go back to tape. Go figure. It's that hypnotic "keeep yorrrr eyeeees on thee speeening wheeeeel" thing. That'll get ya every time.

At least I was there for the whole trip from about 1958 onward and have both tape and digital. It was a cool journey I wouldn't trade, but I wouldn't go back to the old days of any era. I'm in fact looking forward to the incoming giant touchscreen, cloud-based, holographic 3d technology rapidly on the way. It's gonna be another part of the cool journey.

If you were there in any of the old days , it's easy enough to get that sound ... if you want it. Cuz, you've already been there, done that. It's not hocus pocus gear. It's .... well ... ya gotta pay for that training if you want the shortcut. Which some old timers now do training for that I hear.

If you weren't there and those days seems magic, well, okay. They weren't.

1982-84 got real good in my opinion with a massive leap in useful tools that didn't gum up the creative process. But that's another era.

There's a 3-year old somewhere now who's gonna eventually visit here at WheelchairSlutz to ask how they got those magic sounds in 2010. Whattya gonna say to that guy when the time comes ?
Old 28th December 2010
  #43
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Mid to late seventies "LITTLE" studios were using el cheapo rtrs like the smaller Otaris. A couple of Pink Floyd had Brenell 8 rack 1" tape machines and JBL monitors plus an assortment of AKG mics, mostly dynamlc, in their home studios & still made good records.

Late seventies I spent time in some good UK studios and saw mostly home made or rather in house made or modified consoles that worked with varying degrees of success.
Unsurprisingly, lots of calrec mics(UK made) in addition to the classics.
Rockfield prolly still have the fabulous C-12s I experienced there in the late 70`s along with all their other excellent mics and outboard.
They also had a superb echo chamber built in an old cow shed, made up of a series of revolving glass plates in a tiled room with a mic at one end and a speaker at the other. And of course just about everyone used real plates.
Monitoring in Rockfield I do remember was Tannoy golds in Lockwood enclosures and a HUGE pair of Cerwin Vegas which were reserved for use by the Deaf Welsh Guitar Player....(grin)
Mostly though the rooms just sounded good.

And of course as has been pointed out earlier you had to be able to come up with the goods when the red light went on.
Not so important these days it seems
Interestingly, I did some mixing in Wessex and the MCI console in there routinely dumped its faders in my lap due to the crap design of the tray rails which were intended to support them.
Old 28th December 2010
  #44
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Original Neumann U87 mics, the old pre 1986 models with the place inside for the battery, were EVERYWHERE and big studios had many dozens of them which were used on almost everything. Most vocals from that period were recorded with the U87 even when the studios might have had older (and now VERY expensive and desirable) Neumann tube U67, U47, or M49 mics lying around. At the time, the older Neumann tube mics, which now commonly sell for $6,000 to $12,000, were considered obsolete surplus and you could buy them cheap, certainly for less than the cost of a (then new) U87. You could almost say that most of the records from that period represent the sound of the original U87. The solid state small diaphram Neumann KM84 was also everywhere replacing the older tube KM54 and KM64 mics. Since 1987, Neumann has made the U87A (also known as U87Ai where the i just means it has an XLR connector) and while similiar to the original U87, the newer mic has changed electronics, no place for a battery as everyone had phantom power by then, and a slightly different capsule. So if you want the original late 70's - early 80's sound, you need to stock up on original U87 mics. As a side note, the sound of original U87 mics, which were basically hand made by Neumann in their historic Berlin factory, will vary from one to the next and studios might have had one or 2 special U87 mics used for mainly for vocals. Neumann is now owned by former rival Sennheiser and new Neumann mics are made in a different factory than the old ones.

Obviously, analog tape, and specifically analog tape saturation was important, mostly for drums. Even today, its not uncommon to record drums with tape and then switch to digital for everything else. Today, you can buy an old 2" analog tape machine pretty cheap, but the cost of tape is very high, the machines require special skills to align, and repair services and parts are either not available or are very expensive.

There are also some signature compressors that were used a lot, which are still popular, like the Urei 1176 and original dbx 160 VU.
Old 28th December 2010
  #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anguswoodhead View Post
ha ha yeah - no copy and pasting. heh
So untrue. Although the term for it then was "flying stuff in."
Old 28th December 2010
  #46
I find a lot of the comments about the level of talent in this thread quite interesting

I started getting into listening to music in the late 70's and early 80's and still have a lot of my old vinyl from that time and there was some great stuff that was marketed to the masses, there was of course a lot of complete crap too but most people tend to not remember or play that on oldie stations now days.

What is largely marketed to the masses now is a pretty/shiny package where talent is not as important and errors can be fixed. I don't think that that means great talent and virtuosity is not out there, it's just not what is selling (or being illegaly downloaded) right now

From reading various posts on Gearslutz and the media I think budgets shrinking is a huge factor in what is different now.
In this very thread there are numerous examples quoted of taking days to get a single guitar part right, breaking it down into minute sections and recording it over and over again until it's perfect. Recording huge quantities of vocal takes and comping and re comping to get them right. That would cost an absolute fortune and few people are interested in spending that kind of cash now, in fact I've read post on this very forum where engineers have stated that if a drummer or a guitarist can't get their parts right, they or the producer will sneak in some replacement drum samples or re play the guitar part themselves after the band has gone home, rather than spend the time and money to break it down into tiny pieces and have the talent get it right, which it seems from what is stated in this thread would have been the case in the late 70's early 80's.
I think from a purely logical standpoint, it also calls into question how much better the talent and preparation was "back in the day" if it took so much time, money, re tracking, comping and effort to get one good track but I wasn't there so that's just an assumption and we al know what they say about those
Old 28th December 2010
  #47
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Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by paultools View Post
I'd add thick-pile carpeting to this list. seriously.
Also Altec 604, Urei 813, and JBL 4311.
LOL so TRUE!!!

plus big reds, tannoy srm 12b's, aurotones and sony table radios in mono fed by a CSG [compatible stereo generator]
Old 28th December 2010
  #48
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Would it be possible to obtain that same sound today ?

Which recording studio today would be the closest ?
Old 28th December 2010
  #49
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One thing I remember from that time which was alluded to earlier in this thread was the separation of musicians and engineers. There were very few engineers who were also musicians. As the artist, you were expected to have rehearsed and know your arrangements (unless you were one of the lucky few on a project with endless budget). The engineers had little patience for changing the music or being creative on the spot as time was money. Alternatively, musicians knew little about the workings of the knobs in the booth or the need for compression/limiting. There was a larger divide which was good from a focus perspective. Know your role, perform it the best you could.

Regarding the gear, Altec and JBL speakers were in a lot of studios. RCA, MCI consoles. Every one had big large speakers & horns. EMT 140s were prevalent. One thing that no one has any more except maybe Blackbird Studios was a dedicated echo chamber. I remember seeing a number of large rooms with high gloss paint on the walls in a variety of shapes from skewed cubicle to even a pyramid room 2 stories tall. The LA2A and RCA compressors were in a lot of studios, still fairly new.

Movable Drum Booths were in a lot of studios.

Neumann mics were all over but AKG was storming the market with their line. The SM57 was still gaining popularity. 8 & 16 track tape recorders. Ampex was big.
Old 28th December 2010
  #50
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Can't you hear all those analog synths? I think this was right before Yamaha DX 7 wiped them away. Analog synths were either hardware-sequenced or played by hand between 1978 and 1982.

No cheap sounding sterile plugins.
Old 28th December 2010
  #51
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Quote:
No cheap sounding sterile plugins.
Oh you're so right.
Old 29th December 2010
  #52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bristol Posse View Post
I started getting into listening to music in the late 70's and early 80's and still have a lot of my old vinyl from that time and there was some great stuff that was marketed to the masses, there was of course a lot of complete crap too but most people tend to not remember or play that on oldie stations now days.
I kinda agree.
I was at music school in the late 70's and started my recording career around 1981.
There is no difference in the musical talent between then and now.
I think the technology has got in the way (or meddled with musicianship) whichever way you want to look at it.
Back then, the live performance to tape really was the live performance.
Yes, you could cut together a great take from 3 or 4 takes, and you could spend a couple of days cutting out tiny slivers between the kick and snare on the drum take to perfect the timing, but nothing like now.
I remember after the mid-80's many would load the live drum take into a fairlight and revision it. Even more so now with Beat Detective and sample replacement programs.
But there were good and bad young players back then, the same as now.
The biggest difference to me is the level of FX and icing on the cake.
It wasn't unusual for productions to be quite dry and fx to be uber subtle back around '78-82. Now many pop records are explosive with hard samples, big room sounds and a wall of guitars and keyboards.
I think it's right to say the main tools of the trade in terms of mics and outboard were the same as now, although we now have even more excellent choices.
More people work at home now, and those people are not using large format consoles. back then, even to make a cheap demo or self release, you'd likely be working in a regular studio with large console and hardware outboard.

Punk and New Wave were big influences between 78 and 82. Back came the simpler productions, the 3 minute songs. many records were made cheaply in budget studios.
In 1981 and 1982 a lot of electronic music was making waves, especially in Europe. 'Dare' by The Human League. OMD, Flock Of Seagulls and Simple Minds.
'White Lines' by Melle Mel was released in 1983 and was a huge hit in the UK.
ABC as produced by Trevor Horn were one of the biggest pop bands in 1981-82. their sound was very drum machine like.
I guess the first few years of the 80's set the tone for the guru producer and heavy (machine) manipulation that became the signature of the mid to late 80's.
Old 29th December 2010
  #53
Quote:
Originally Posted by kvmoore View Post
You mean early 80's right? The TR808 wasn't introduced by Roland until late 1980 based on my research on it's history. But yeah, it was definitely used a lot throughout the 80's and helped pave the way for a new era of music, especially hip-hop, modern r&b, and dance.
Yes i was thinking early 80's NYC dance music(Man Parrish,John Robie, Arthur Baker, Afrika Bambaattaa). Though the Acetone Rhythm Ace had been around years before the 808's release and people were already using them for rhythms.
Old 29th December 2010
  #54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Studer View Post
Thanks a lot for your answers ! It's very interesting.

When I said 78-82, I wanted to highlight this typical sound of (some examples) :

- Alan Parsons Project
- Ashford & Simpson
- George Duke
- Bobby Caldwell
- Change
- David Bowie
- Elton John
-...and soooooooo many more.

A punchy, somewhat "less" reverberated and medium sound than in the early 70's. But not the sound of 85, 86, 87 when it changed a lot.
Some of the stuff i named was what was used here to make Disco and Dance music. In the late 70's and early 80's, Disco and dance music was what kept some of the bigger studios from closing their doors, kinda like how Rap did here in the late 90's and early 00's. They would book a lot of hours at discounted rates late and over nights when no one wanted to be in the studio. But just like what happened in this decade, when the home studio market to took over and basically put the nail in the coffins in a lot of the major studios, when midi was introduced and became part of the main stream in the mid to late 80's, same thing happened to a lot of the major or "historic" studios. The owners could not match the rates of the smaller mid line production studios that sprung up to stay in business and people were now able to work out there productions at home and not need to book "demo" session hours.
Old 29th December 2010
  #55
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Quick postscript: Much has been written here about going over and over stuff & doing endless takes and punchins.
This DID happen but not on the rank & file, day to day stuff.
Recording time cost money even more so than it does today.

I certainly don`t recall being allowed the luxury of endless takes and months of dubbing comping and mixing time.

Typically in my experience an album would be cut, mixed and in the can within a couple of weeks, unless you were Rush or similar.

And yes there was a lot of dross around, but a far smaller percentage than nowadays, simply because it wasn`t possible to record a release quality album in your bedroom unless you had a very big, very well - equipped bedroom. (grin) And of course a proper record company with proper distribution was the only real way to get a record out.
Old 29th December 2010
  #56
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I wonder why films productions can raise millions of dollars, and why music productions have less and less.

What is the problem ? If film productions can find money, music production should. Piracy exists both on films and music. Cheap hardware exist both on films and music.

On the other hand, I know the consequences : a lot (not all) of poorly realized albums. Not to mention horrible masterings
Old 30th December 2010
  #57
Oceansize, Biffy Clyro, Muse, Nine Inch Nails, Radiohead, Closure In Moscow, Emarosa, Sigur Ros.

Plenty of bands around doing decent structures, some of them even on the radio.
Old 30th December 2010
  #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkyGoldstein View Post
Can't you hear all those analog synths? I think this was right before Yamaha DX 7 wiped them away. Analog synths were either hardware-sequenced or played by hand between 1978 and 1982.

No cheap sounding sterile plugins.
Good point.
The sound of productions did start changing around the mid-80's, and that obviously had a lot to do with the instruments being used.
78-82: minimoog, arp odyssey, prophet 5, CS-80, Jupiter 8, Juno 6, oberheims...Pure analog sounds.
Even "Thriller" predates the DX7 by a few months, although they did use the GS-1 on it.
Old 30th December 2010
  #59
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Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Studer View Post
Thanks ! Please could you tell me from what category these things are.

Altec 604, Urei 813, and JBL 4311

I regret music schools don't even tell you about old techniques !!!

Thanks again.

Adding to the list and cleaning it.
Monitors
Old 30th December 2010
  #60
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