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This Deadmau5 sound, how did he do it?
Old 26th December 2010
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

This Deadmau5 sound, how did he do it?

Right,

ima start off with a quick disclaimer (as usual) I'm not trying to copy this sound, just understand how it was created so I could apply lessons learned to my own production in a creative and original way (I hope).

YouTube - Deadmau5 - Some Chords (HD)

The organ type sound at the very beginning of the track, how would you go about making that sound?

Thanks guys

Merry christmas times, hope you all got nice prezziez
Old 26th December 2010
  #2
Gear Maniac
 

or maybe not
Old 26th December 2010
  #3
Gear Maniac
 

please
Old 26th December 2010
  #4
Lives for gear
From what I know and have read it's nothing really special and more about him. He uses ableton to make his stuff and mostly soft synths. A lot of sidechaining the bass and kick deep and the rest is just simply skill and composition. Build a house beat play with the sidechain compressor to get it pumping low/cutting which is going to give you the majority of your sound, play a deep bass moog experiment that really grooves or get something like trillian and sylnth and pick some samples. Add some saturation on the bass a bit some arpegiation might help if you're not a great synth player. I have a feeling most of his stuff is drawn in by hand as far as the bass synths. Ableton, sidechaining, fat moogs should be a start and just listen to his composition style. The organ sounds like a organ with some little fx...Kontakt has plenty of samples of organs but there is a free sampler cd made by him out there with his sounds...although it's not processed or of high quality.
Old 26th December 2010
  #5
Lives for gear
 

it sounds like a saw wave type organ patch put through a filter effect, maybe with some distortion or bitcrusher
Old 27th December 2010
  #6
Registered User
The organ sound is obviously distorted. You would start off with a fairly mellow organ tone, and the distortion adds the harmonic grit.

It's actually VERY hard to get great distorted organ sounds from a synth or sampler. Using samples that are pre-distorted does not sound like this - it's much better to take a clean sound and distort the total sound. This is rather similar to distorting guitar sounds - a synth guitar lead sounds far more realistic if you play a clean tone through a distortion effect, rather than playing samples of distorted guitars.

As soon as you start distorting organ tones, you will realise that tuning and beat notes make a huge difference. And equal temperament tuning is NOT your friend. And when you are basically triggering sine waves manually with your fingers - the phase relationship changes dramatically each time ... yuck!

If you really enjoy great distorted organ tones from the past, you will discover that real electronic organs solved this problem in their basic design. Hammond tone wheels had all the sine waves coming off the same shaft - therefore the phase relationship is permanently locked together. And the tuning is actually fudged a little to get all the notes coming from the same shaft. What this means is that a Hammond organ can play ANY combination of notes, even chromatic tone clusters, and create a sharp, consistent, laser-focused tone that distorts beautifully without beat notes or mushy phasyness. Whether players understand this intellectually or not - I have no doubt this is why the Hammond is the king of keyboards. The very best digital tonewheel models ensure that the sinewaves are synchronised in this way.

The transistor organs weren't quite as good - but they eliminated nasty beating between octaves because all octave notes came from the same oscillator. There were 12 oscillators, manually tuned, and the octaves were generated with frequency dividers. So when you play octaves, there is zero chance of randomly getting the sinewaves slightly out of phase or cancelling.

Analog synths and samplers can make sinewave organ-like tones - but they suffer a huge problem due to the random phase cancellation. The oscillator or sample is triggered by a note-on event - so it's totally up to chance whether the sinewaves sum or null. (As compared to tonewheels or transistor oscillators which are constantly running - as you can hear in the background leakage, which is another beautiful missing ingredient).

The ugliness of these random phase relationships and the beat notes created by equal temperatment become VERY apparant when you attempt to distort a pure organ tone from a synth or sampler.

In this particular clip - I can hear some dramatic beating which seems to have been used to good artistic effect. Notice that there are dramatic changes in the beating, depending on what notes are played. Hear the very fast beating at "21", and compare this to the other chords before and after.

Many synth organ patches attempt to get around this problem by apply modulation effects. This breaks up the beating and phasing problems - but it turns it into a heavy mess of gospel or circus sort of organ FX.

Or - some organ patches have sampled the rotary Leslie speaker, to give the constantly changing phase. But if you play a chord, the phase relationship of the notes is all messed up. There is nothing like the purity of a pure tone, distorted to pefection, and THEN sent through a Leslie.

I love distorted organ, and for total musical freedom you really need to get a dedicated synchronised tonewheel engine - whether software or hardware.

Otherwise - use the effect like in this clip, which is rather well done.
Old 27th December 2010
  #7
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwi View Post
The organ sound is obviously distorted. You would start off with a fairly mellow organ tone, and the distortion adds the harmonic grit.

It's actually VERY hard to get great distorted organ sounds from a synth or sampler. Using samples that are pre-distorted does not sound like this - it's much better to take a clean sound and distort the total sound. This is rather similar to distorting guitar sounds - a synth guitar lead sounds far more realistic if you play a clean tone through a distortion effect, rather than playing samples of distorted guitars.

As soon as you start distorting organ tones, you will realise that tuning and beat notes make a huge difference. And equal temperament tuning is NOT your friend. And when you are basically triggering sine waves manually with your fingers - the phase relationship changes dramatically each time ... yuck!

If you really enjoy great distorted organ tones from the past, you will discover that real electronic organs solved this problem in their basic design. Hammond tone wheels had all the sine waves coming off the same shaft - therefore the phase relationship is permanently locked together. And the tuning is actually fudged a little to get all the notes coming from the same shaft. What this means is that a Hammond organ can play ANY combination of notes, even chromatic tone clusters, and create a sharp, consistent, laser-focused tone that distorts beautifully without beat notes or mushy phasyness. Whether players understand this intellectually or not - I have no doubt this is why the Hammond is the king of keyboards. The very best digital tonewheel models ensure that the sinewaves are synchronised in this way.

The transistor organs weren't quite as good - but they eliminated nasty beating between octaves because all octave notes came from the same oscillator. There were 12 oscillators, manually tuned, and the octaves were generated with frequency dividers. So when you play octaves, there is zero chance of randomly getting the sinewaves slightly out of phase or cancelling.

Analog synths and samplers can make sinewave organ-like tones - but they suffer a huge problem due to the random phase cancellation. The oscillator or sample is triggered by a note-on event - so it's totally up to chance whether the sinewaves sum or null. (As compared to tonewheels or transistor oscillators which are constantly running - as you can hear in the background leakage, which is another beautiful missing ingredient).

The ugliness of these random phase relationships and the beat notes created by equal temperatment become VERY apparant when you attempt to distort a pure organ tone from a synth or sampler.

In this particular clip - I can hear some dramatic beating which seems to have been used to good artistic effect. Notice that there are dramatic changes in the beating, depending on what notes are played. Hear the very fast beating at "21", and compare this to the other chords before and after.

Many synth organ patches attempt to get around this problem by apply modulation effects. This breaks up the beating and phasing problems - but it turns it into a heavy mess of gospel or circus sort of organ FX.

Or - some organ patches have sampled the rotary Leslie speaker, to give the constantly changing phase. But if you play a chord, the phase relationship of the notes is all messed up. There is nothing like the purity of a pure tone, distorted to pefection, and THEN sent through a Leslie.

I love distorted organ, and for total musical freedom you really need to get a dedicated synchronised tonewheel engine - whether software or hardware.

Otherwise - use the effect like in this clip, which is rather well done.

+1 great info. A lot of people re-mic synths as well through pa speakers, amps and monitors. Well most do in rock like depeche mode ect. Maybe running through a nice tube amp with a bit of distortion and room sound could help also. I'l be re-micing this evening with some hot api's and some amp distrotion for a song. If stereo micing you have to watch it...I do a stereo xy a bit with a great river and api in the room and watch for phase. Gives me a nice live airy sound.
Old 27th December 2010
  #8
Lives for gear
 
gsilbers's Avatar
 

some of the sounds are from wavealchemy. synth stabs and sfx.

from a pix of his studio u see e has plenty of outboard gear. moogs, nord, juno etc.

Deadmau5 in the Studio | Jesse Brede
Old 27th December 2010
  #9
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
use the effect like in this clip, which is rather well done.
love the info. But could you explain how to do it step by step thankskkksss !!!!
Old 27th December 2010
  #10
Gear Nut
 
John Nonjohn's Avatar
 

To recreate the organ sound, I would probably start with an additive synth or a modular synth by layering multiple (4-5+) sine waves or low-pass filtered triangle waves. One of the organ harmonics is clearly stronger than the fundamental--play with the levels of the harmonics to create your own, unique, clean-sounding organ sonority.

The distortion component of the organ is not heard initially, and it fades in to become yet another layer of the composite, organ sound. To create the distortion layer, I would start with a couple of slightly high-passed filtered, sawtooth waves that were distorted somehow - lots of possibilities for distortion. One way to generate distortion would be to run the saw waves into a cheap mixer and crank up the preamps!

Later on, yet another layer appears . . . it sounds like electric guitar!

The clean-organ, distortion component, and the electric guitar sounds could be on 3 tracks in a DAW--fade each component in to arrive at the total sonority. The composite sound could be created with a modular synth + sampler + sampled electric guitar, or it could be all done with software synths and a DAW!

Layering sounds and components of sounds, to create composite sounds, is still a very fertile ground in the exploration of sound and creative use of technology!

The mix achieves the bounce effect with some kind of buss compressor with sidechain function.
Old 3rd August 2011
  #11
Lives for gear
 
JoeyM's Avatar
I'm late to the party, but my favorite song today was Deadmau5's
Moar Ghosts 'n' Stuff, by the second turnaround, when they turn the mantra on, wow. Not usually my style of music, but this is an exception
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