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1970's Ludwig Supraphonic Snare Drum Effects Pedals, Units & Accessories
Old 24th December 2010
  #1
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Circuitt's Avatar
 

1970's Ludwig Supraphonic Snare Drum

need help identifying the year.

Old 24th December 2010
  #2
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Circuitt's Avatar
 

Bump
Old 25th December 2010
  #3
looks like it's a anywhere between 1976-1979 Supra probably closer to 78 or 79 though i'd say. that's just a guess though.

1976 917xxx - 1290xxx
1978
xxxxxxx
1979
xxxxxxx - 2013537

Last edited by WestBerliner; 25th December 2010 at 01:06 AM.. Reason: formatting
Old 25th December 2010
  #4
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Tom Hakala's Avatar
 

I have 1970 Supra. There's a stamp inside.

Great snare btw... but I guess you know that too heh
Old 25th December 2010
  #5
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Here a few other pics.. maybe there is a better category to post this under?


Old 25th December 2010
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Halloween View Post
You are absolutely wrong. To start with, a 1965 would have the "Keystone" type badge, not the banner. Additionally, there are too many digits in the serial number for a 1965.

This is a late '70s drum, probably a '79.
Old 26th December 2010
  #8
SRS
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I'm not a Ludwig expert, but own a few. I am in the same belief that it is in the area of a late 70's model. 78-79ish
Old 26th December 2010
  #9
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I'd like to echo the late 70s view too. Not that I know for certain, but I had an early supra when I was very young, came with a ludwig black oyster kit, my second kit, without knowing it was such a classic snare.

This one looks more modern than the one I had, more modern than most supras I've encountered actually. And I mean the details on it, not its condition. For example, the snare strainer and blue/yellow badge on it looks different than the one I had and most I've encountered.

In the link below, scroll down to see Ludwigs traditional badge (it's brass and smaller), and the traditional snare strainer. Also note the muffler lever, whereas your snare has a more sophisticated knob, allowing for much more gradual adjustment of the muffling. http://www.drummuffler.com/vintage-ludwig-drums
Old 26th December 2010
  #10
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Ludwig rounded the corners on the badge more in '79 so it would be before that. I have an acrolite from 1978 with a serial # starting 180xxxx. I don't know if the Supraphonic ran off of the same serial #'s but if it did that would put yours late '78.
Old 26th December 2010
  #11
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Thanks for the help guys, i actually got this for some side-work barter deal. (easy 1 hour of my time) so i am sure i didn't get ripped.
dude said it was 71-72... but whatever it's a good snare either way correct?

will most likely be using this for recording. I hear it's a versatile snare drum for any style of playing, is this true? I am not really a drum collector or anything nutzo, but I find this stuff very interesting.
Old 26th December 2010
  #12
SRS
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What's your goal in finding out Circuitt? Just curious? Or trying to sell it? ...???
Old 26th December 2010
  #13
SRS
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Funny... we posted at the same time! No, you did not get taken, unless your time is worth more than about $350 per hour or so...
Old 26th December 2010
  #14
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Steve Holley was here (Wings drummer) a few weeks ago and that is what he brought along.

I also have an older one that came with mey first Ludwig kit....1968, Keysone badge.

All the Superphonics, even the Acrolites, are great. Simple non ginnicky drums that sound great on almost anything.
Old 26th December 2010
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Circuitt
.. but whatever it's a good snare either way correct?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Circuitt
I hear it's a versatile snare drum for any style of playing, is this true?
It's as great as a classic Stratocaster and the likes. The fuzz mostly comes from that "it is a safe bet for getting the standard snare sound right", much like a well conserved 63 strat does too. Whether that is good or not, is up to taste and the situation. A heavy metal guitarist may not prefer the classic strat.

The differences between drum sounds today compared to mid-60s/70s, is enormous (today, great drumsounds is the Steven Slate sound). Keep in mind that the Supra is made to appeal to the sound ideal of that time. It was made more with acoustic use in mind.

And it does sound acoustic, very crisp and sharp, snappy, responds very well to nuanced playing. It's able to deliver solid cracks as well as the softest of nuances through a background of sound, thanks to its very steel-ish brittle sound. Compared to today’s stuff though, it may lack bottom, and if not tuned properly (or not using good heads) it has a tendency to give kindof a cardboard-ish sound. By comparison, it is a thin snare, so it does have its sweet spot pitch area when it comes to tuning, doesn’t do lower nor higher tuning as well. It does higher tuning better than lower though.

It is very liked as 'Kleine trommel' in symphony orchestra usage, commonly found in music schools, and also very liked by big band drummers. Like any classic, it is a safe bet for getting the standard snare sound of the time right. It’s a nice snare, it records quite well, but remember that the hype is always better than the actual thing.

Good luck with it
Old 26th December 2010
  #16
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Jon Estes's Avatar
 

The people over at Vintage Drum Forum can give you a better answer than you'll probably find here on GS.

Vintage Drum Forum - Vintage Drum History - Vintage Drums
Old 26th December 2010
  #17
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The serial number will date it for you. There are a number of good books on the topic (Rob Cook's book on Ludwigs could be of value); but since it appears your interest in learning the year was simply to ascribe 'value', you are well in the land of 'fair'.
I did the first book on Ludwig ("History of the Ludwig Drum Company", Centerstream Pub., 1991), and while visiting with Mr. Ludwig (Wm. F. Jr. who was there since before WWII) he recounted the metal-shell drum development in relationship to the company - thought some of you might find a bit of it interesting:
Wm. F. Sr. always liked the snare sound of Tom Mills (drummer with John Phillips Sousa) and he purchased Mills' snare directly from him and duplicated it. The metal-shelled drums were crisper, sharper, and more durable than wood. In the early days they used brass because it was easy to get, not expensive, and plated beautifully. When brass prices went up they switched to bronze, and developed the aluminum-shelled snare, accurately noted in an earlier post as the Acrolite (this development was occuring in the 1960s). The shift in materials was purely financial, and both models were not considered inferior from previous designs, nor are they now. All three variations have their own sound - different, but equal in quality. One of the reasons the S. 400 snares (like yours) were so popular is because they work on everything, and do it really well. So many recordings that have become classics (in every style) have S. 400 snares. If the older S. 400s were rare they would be very expensive, but Ludwig sold more of those drums than anything else they ever made, at a time when musical instruments were selling at an all-time high (they called it the "Beatle boom"); and since Ludwig was so present in the school systems (a market they went towards when the popular drum kit of the day was a "Gene Krupa" - Gene played Slingerlands), they were everywhere. The older brass-shelled S. 400s are expensive now because they are rare(r), and my experience with them is that they are more powerful and 'wetter' than the next incarnation, but those aren't necessarily features as the next version was not as thick, and the Acolites were really perky and energetic. It depends on your desire for a given situation (like any other instrument or piece of recording gear). The low cost of vintage Ludwigs is not commensurate with their quality and musicality.
I know I didn't give you the date of your drum, but perhaps this is more interesting.
Old 26th December 2010
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SRS View Post
No, you did not get taken, unless your time is worth more than about $350 per hour or so...
not worth $350, but a nice drum... i greatly prefer the 60's supraphonics, but 70's are ok...

**Vintage '70s Ludwig 5x14" Supraphonic Snare Drum - eBay (item 290515446636 end time Dec-26-10 18:28:45 PST)
Old 26th December 2010
  #19
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kgdrum_nyc's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
You are absolutely wrong. To start with, a 1965 would have the "Keystone" type badge, not the banner. Additionally, there are too many digits in the serial number for a 1965.

This is a late '70s drum, probably a '79.
+1 agree late 70's

65 had a different logo
Old 26th December 2010
  #20
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Found a clip showcasing the classic muffled supra sound. Legend Steve Gadd demonstrates his groove on Paul Simon's "50 ways to leave your lover", using the supraphonic (he used it on lots of records). Note the brittle clarity even when muffled.

YouTube - Gadd's 50 Ways
Old 26th December 2010
  #21
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junior's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steffmo View Post
All the Superphonics, even the Acrolites, are great. Simple non ginnicky drums that sound great on almost anything.
+1 on Acrolites from the 60s... seriously underrated brother to the Supraphonic!
Old 27th December 2010
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sk106 View Post
And it does sound acoustic, very crisp and sharp, snappy, responds very well to nuanced playing. It's able to deliver solid cracks as well as the softest of nuances through a background of sound, thanks to its very steel-ish brittle sound. Compared to today’s stuff though, it may lack bottom, and if not tuned properly (or not using good heads) it has a tendency to give kindof a cardboard-ish sound. By comparison, it is a thin snare, so it does have its sweet spot pitch area when it comes to tuning, doesn’t do lower nor higher tuning as well. It does higher tuning better than lower though.
^^^This. I couldn't have said it better. (In fact, I probably couldn't have even said it half as well!) But the 70's Ludwig Supraphonics have been one of my favorite snare drums since the 70's, for those exact reasons.

Listen to Bill Bruford on "Yours Is No Disgrace". Classic Supraphonic snap.
Old 27th December 2010
  #23
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Well I got the snare for practically nothing, a few clicks of a mouse. so I am happy with it. sounds great I think. thanks for the in-depth info, I find Vintage
Drums very Interesting indeed. now I need to find a nice kick counter-part.
merry xmas g-slutz.
Old 27th December 2010
  #24
SRS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by analogjeff View Post
not worth $350, but a nice drum... i greatly prefer the 60's supraphonics, but 70's are ok...

**Vintage '70s Ludwig 5x14" Supraphonic Snare Drum - eBay (item 290515446636 end time Dec-26-10 18:28:45 PST)
OK... 2 to $300 bucks an hour... In any case, splitting hairs aside, it was a decent deal for a tiny bit-o-time. Time is money, and in this case, IMO it was time well spent. Congrats on a nice drum!
Old 27th December 2010
  #25
Harmless Wacko
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Halloween View Post
Hey... Where is that YouTube "Logic 9 BD equivalent" tutorial anyways?

Stuck in a closet with that 1965 mid Seventies badge Supraphonic?



SM.
Old 27th December 2010
  #26
I'm guessing, but I would say it is 76 to 79.
Old 26th June 2016
  #27
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What if I have what appears to be an old superphonic but is not stamped with a serial # on the badge?
Old 26th June 2016
  #28
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Keystone badge with no serial number puts it 1960-1963. If it's heavy, it's a brass shell. I think all the parallelogram badges had serial numbers.

I think the OP has an early 70's drum.
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