The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Techniques for loud mix ITB Dynamics Plugins
Old 28th December 2010
  #31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rimby View Post
I'm a noob at mixing so forgive me....but I want to make sure I'm understanding this correctly:

If each individual channel is well limited then there are no transients to slip through to the buss compressor, which then means that stronger amounts of compression can be applied to the buss? Because nothing is slipping through to make it pump which might call for a reduction in the level of compression (assuming someone didn't want the pumping)?
wrong. use less compression in the box.. use more limiting to avoid intersample and other sample/nonsample/Uebersample peaks. if you smash a signal where no transients pass, then there is seriously something wrong. you just need to put a limiter no all the busses, because the digital meter will not show you reality.

if you limit a bus, it's not like there are no transients anymore.

I will do a video. you can buy it for 50 US$. maybe I will do some additional ones and sell it as box-set. only 250US$ (I did assistant recording for the re-remix of pink shoyds- the division flower). if you buy the book I write along, it's on sale for 270 US$. I will release a set of samples for replacing the drums, guitars, voice and the voice of your girlfriend. 680US$. buy my plugins I will release, to transform a ****ty band into a good one.. 1500 US$.

learn how to mix... can't buy with money. heh
Old 28th December 2010
  #32
Lives for gear
 

Techniques for loud mix ITB

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson

Quote:
Very few mix engineers I've worked with use multiband compression as anything other than ... not as simple as "use compression".
Au contraire mon liebchen!

A million years ago, I asked pretty much this precise question on the TapeOp message board, and the genius-of-all-trades Joel Hamilton gave this specific answer, "Multi-band compression and limiting."

Or the question was more general... "what do 'commercial' mixes have that mark them as being so crisp and detailed and yet so forceful?"

And lo/behold, it turns out that he was onto something-- jockeying the thresholds and attacks and releases in a multi-band compressor and a limiter are excellent ways to shape the 'densities' and highlight frequency ranges in a real 'sculptural' way-- not that it's mandatory ever, not that you can't get a punchy mix in many different ways-- but as a handy way to contain the tendency of loud stuff to overload, while keeping a sense of drama intact-- I hate to end this like a simpering magazine review or something, but it's one approach that the concerned audio enthusiast might well be advised to look into!
+1

I use multiband compression more often than not
Old 28th December 2010
  #33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dream View Post
+1

I use multiband compression more often than not
need to try that. on individual tracks or on the masterbus?
Old 28th December 2010
  #34
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by George Necola View Post
need to try that. on individual tracks or on the masterbus?
Usually the master bus...i guess its useful for when you've got things like drums pumping through and what not, it's easier to separate the different elements and get a better overall balance as opposed to a normal compressor on the master bus.
Old 28th December 2010
  #35
Lives for gear
I like your views on the limiter's on individual tracks George, i might try that out and see what sounds i can get...to be honest i never really tried it haha...
Old 28th December 2010
  #36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nelson89 View Post
Usually the master bus...i guess its useful for when you've got things like drums pumping through and what not, it's easier to separate the different elements and get a better overall balance as opposed to a normal compressor on the master bus.
interesting.. I mean.. I know exactly what you are talking about. usually I put an EQ on the master before the compressor and after the compressor.. at the end of the chain is the limiter.

if I want a certain frequency to be dominant and trigger the "not-multiband comp" I just dial that in.. it's not multi-band compression.. just a different view.

never had much luck with multiband compressor/limiter on the masterbus. will try that, when I have the time.
Old 28th December 2010
  #37
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by George Necola View Post
interesting.. I mean.. I know exactly what you are talking about. usually I put an EQ on the master before the compressor and after the compressor.. at the end of the chain is the limiter.

if I want a certain frequency to be dominant and trigger the "not-multiband comp" I just dial that in.. it's not multi-band compression.. just a different view.

never had much luck with multiband compressor/limiter on the masterbus. will try that, when I have the time.
Yeh, definitely a thing to try when you've got the time...i've been using it for years and i still probably couldn't tell you EXACTLY how to use it...its a bit full on haha...so yeh don't let it disturb your workflow now, just try it when you've got some spare time, you might be surprised. I generally use the multiband compression to hit everything at once, but with the care it needs, because obviously say the bass of the track might need a different setting to the mid's or the treble...if i didn't have a multiband compressor, i would probably duplicate the track twice so i had 3 separate ones, low pass one, hi pass one and band pass the other in the mids and play with the frequency points until they crossed over right, then compress each separately.

If it helps generally if i master a song, the chain is usually Surgical EQ > Multiband Compressor > Colour EQ > Colour Stereo Compressor > Brickwall Limiter

I just find that when the Multiband Compressor is in the chain, it helps control the dynamics a bit more before they hit the Stereo Compressor and Brickwall Limiter. Multiband limiters are equally as useful, but i don't use them as often.
Old 28th December 2010
  #38
Lives for gear
 
duvalle's Avatar
 

cool thread, but two important aspects of loud mixes seem to be missing so far imho:
arrangement and the right choice of sounds!

after that you can limit, comp and eq like crazy … ;-)
Old 28th December 2010
  #39
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by duvalle View Post
cool thread, but two important aspects of loud mixes seem to be missing so far imho:
arrangement and the right choice of sounds!

after that you can limit, comp and eq like crazy … ;-)
thumbsup thumbsup except the OP was talking about the same recording, he just sent the tracks to a veteran mixer...in a general case though, i more than agree with you
Old 28th December 2010
  #40
Lives for gear
 
Sigma's Avatar
light 1.5 -2 :1 compression followed by followed by cranesong followed by multiband L3 on the2 buss

inside the mix compression on tracks and compression and peak limiting on drums
Old 28th December 2010
  #41
Fezzle
Guest
Record sensible levels, to around -12 is all good, this gives output 1+2 ample headroom , try n get maximum volume for your voltage on the way in.. what i mean by this is try n capture the sounds well in terms of where they really shine in theyre range. This ensures youve got lots of harmonics which gives you more percieved volume for the voltage reading on the meter. This principle will set you up for a louder mix straight away... plus by having sensible levels going in youve got leeway up n down on your faders which is important.
Then cut out unwanted frequencies to taste.. usually bass n bass drum eat up lots of headroom, so you can usually just chop out 40Hz down as a starting guide, also not too much of it!!! good balance is essential. in my experience less is more
This will help you get louder mixes that still sound open and clear.. If youve got a strained master bus with multiband compression, you can get it loud, but it will be at the expense of transients and tone.
Most of all trust your ears and practice, that will bring you the best results
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
MikeyMike / Rap + Hip Hop engineering and production
271
navitus / Electronic Music Instruments and Electronic Music Production
2
Unknown soldier / So much gear, so little time
1

Forum Jump
Forum Jump