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48V zapped my ribbon mic Ribbon Microphones
Old 27th December 2010
  #31
Here for the gear
 

I've seen that but I don't believe it except when phantom powere is switched on at the preamp. It definitely is not what happens when you put 48 on a ribbon when plugging in a phono TRS plug. What happens is one side gets the volts, that sends the ribbon flying. The one I showed you shows the ribbon flying off, but coming back. I think that is a difference, otherwise what would all the people having rerribbons done for? Something must be blowing them. And then there is loose, so then there is a sound change. That's what I wanted to point out.
Old 27th December 2010
  #32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recordiosity View Post
I've seen that but I don't believe it except when phantom powere is switched on at the preamp. It definitely is not what happens when you put 48 on a ribbon when plugging in a phono TRS plug. What happens is one side gets the volts, that sends the ribbon flying. The one I showed you shows the ribbon flying off, but coming back. I think that is a difference, otherwise what would all the people having rerribbons done for? Something must be blowing them. And then there is loose, so then there is a sound change. That's what I wanted to point out.
I'm trying to avoid confusing people because there are 2 videos showing completely different things.

The one showing the ribbon coming back ( YouTube - Crowley and Tripp Roswellite (tm) Ribbon Microphone Material ) is a demonstration of a different ribbon material - Roswellite ribbon material - which can bounce back. It says right in the video "this would completely destroy any other ribbon". We don't want people thinking that this is evidence that all ribbons can withstand that kind of treatment.

The vast majority of ribbons are aluminum, will be stretched or broken by a short in ph. power, which can happen when hot-patching in a TT or TRS patchbay, or with a bad XLR cable, as explained and demonstrated in this video:

YouTube - Ribbon Microphones and Phantom Power

Watch the whole video. Believe your own eyes and ears. He is showing exactly what happens, why and how.

.
Old 27th December 2010
  #33
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PlugHead's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PlugHead View Post

Is there any easy way to avoid this transient spike while inserting cables into the PB? Can we only avoid it via powering down the pre's before connection and powering back up afterward, etc?

thx!
bump to this question...
Old 28th December 2010
  #34
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlugHead View Post
bump to this question...
I don't think there's a way to avoid the short that happens unless you put one of these:

FetHead - tritonaudio

or a Cloud Lifter:

Products | Cloud Microphones

Between the patchbay and the mic.

Remember, this only matters when patching at mic level - between the pre and the mic. Patching post pre is OK.

.
Old 28th December 2010
  #35
Gear Addict
 
trompetfreak's Avatar
 

Thanks for sharing! Aspecially the shinybox video is VERY educational!
I used to be almost scared of handling ribbon mics from someone else, triple checking the 48v and still hoping I did it right, but I think I'm safe now

Great thread.
Old 28th December 2010
  #36
member no 666
 
Fletcher's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryce View Post
Cloud Microphones makes a box called a Cloudlifter that converts phantom power into 20dB+ of gain. The phantom power never gets to the mic, so you don't have to worry about turning it off.

Even cooler - it works with any passive mic, not just ribbons.

dB
That's called "an amplifier". They work in all kinds of situations - and generally "amplify" the signal... who'd a thunk?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PlugHead View Post
Is there any easy way to avoid this transient spike while inserting cables into the PB? Can we only avoid it via powering down the pre's before connection and powering back up afterward, etc?
There are two ways - one is to build an XLR patchbay for your mics - the second is to connect the mic to the cable after you've made a patch on a TRS / TT patchbay.
Old 28th December 2010
  #37
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Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher View Post
That's called "an amplifier". They work in all kinds of situations - and generally "amplify" the signal... who'd a thunk?



There are two ways - one is to build an XLR patchbay for your mics - the second is to connect the mic to the cable after you've made a patch on a TRS / TT patchbay.
thumbsup
Old 28th December 2010
  #38
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PlugHead's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher View Post
There are two ways - one is to build an XLR patchbay for your mics - the second is to connect the mic to the cable after you've made a patch on a TRS / TT patchbay.
Thanks Fletcher - that's what I expected (XLR patchbay) but didn't think to connect the mic AFTER the PB - sounds like the solution for now, as another PB is not in the cards (yet!).

cheers!
Old 7th February 2011
  #39
Gear Nut
 

all ok

well the mic is fine... after it released 20 or so tiny charges into me....
it is back to it's full health :D
Old 7th February 2011
  #40
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Friedemann's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fluner View Post
well the mic is fine... after it released 20 or so tiny charges into me....
it is back to it's full health :D
No it is probably not! Check the cable again, check the desk outup with a voltmeter and check the cabling inside the 160. It is in no situation normal or healthy to have phantom power on the body of the mic. Not for the mic and possibly not even for you. If the desk is causing the fault who says it is not supplying more than 10 mA to your body if you touch it? Carefull! Your equipment is not working safely!

Best regards

Friedemann

EDIT: And if you ever again have to uncharge a microphone, touch it to the (cold!) radiator.
Old 8th February 2011
  #41
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Bryce's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher View Post
That's called "an amplifier". They work in all kinds of situations - and generally "amplify" the signal... who'd a thunk?
Isn't it actually more of a "pre-amplifier"?

dB
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