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Mic splitting box to record dry and fx track. Help needed, inquire within... Mixers (Analog)
Old 18th December 2010
  #1
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AndyFromDenver's Avatar
Mic splitting box to record dry and fx track. Help needed, inquire within...

I'm sort of seeing some other threads regarding this, but they don't address my specific use.
I want to go into an external preamp (LA610) with a mic signal, then on the back end split the output to go 1. to the A/D converter (Motu mk3) and 2. through hardware fx (Rev7) then to A/D. So I can track with a wet reverb signal without passing my dry nice signal through the poopy rev7 16bit process.
I know all the standard yays and nays for fx to "tape" but I have a setting I go to most every time I just want to capture on the way in.
If I use a device like this:
OSP Buyers Group
do I need to flip the phase of the signals in the DAW? Or help me out is this a bad idea all together?

some p.s. I don't use a patchbay. I just get down and make the connections.
Also, bonus points for someone to suggest a detailed way to make it so I can use nice parts and save some dough.

Thank you in advance for any input.
Old 19th December 2010
  #2
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AndyFromDenver's Avatar
Pretty please and junk
Old 19th December 2010
  #3
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savyurrecords's Avatar
 

Splitsville

The mic splitter that you found will only work if you have another mic preamp, which I assume is not the case. This is because the mic splitter has to go before the preamps. The best, but not cheap, solution is an audio distribution amp. These normally come in flavors of 1 input to 4/8 outputs. The cheapest I found was about $350 and not what I would want in my recording chain.

The absolute cheapest way would be to split the cable coming out of the preamp with either an adaptor or cutting cables and wiring a Y cable up. Then the split would go to the audio interface and the reverb.

Does the preamp have more than one output? Even on a different type of connector? You could try that as well.

A final idea is to use a mixer. Plug the preamp into a line input on a mixer. Then pan that signal to the center. Then use the left output of the mixer to go to the interface and the right to go to the reverb.

Lots of ways to get it done. It just depends on what you want to spend.
I have done the cheapest solution of making a Y cable plenty of times. You will lose a little bit of gain (3db) after the split(which can be compensated for easily).

Y cables are simple to make. Take two cables that have the connectors that you need, hopefully made by the same company so they will be color coded the same. Cut them and strip the conductors. Take three of the cable halfs and connect them together matching the colors of the wires together. Solder the splices if you can and then tape or use wire nuts. You will have one cable half left over.

Rich
Old 19th December 2010
  #4
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The output impedance of the 610 is 80 ohms, so splitting is going to result in some loss of high end (input impedance on most devices is 600 ohms, splitting gives you 300 ohms, which is pretty low). It apparently only allows either line level or mic level outputs, not both. Since you're not really happy about the AD conversion of your reverb, you'd probably be best served with a mic splitter, sending the straight thru signal to the DAW and the split signal (which uses a transformer) to the reverb.

It's a step farther, but you could just record the track with the 610, then output it thru the reverb and bring it back into the DAW on another track (or if there's an insert on your interface, just send from the insert to the reverb and bring back on another channel).
Old 19th December 2010
  #5
Registered User
I have a few of these, and find them very useful for problems like this:

AV-DC4 Line-Level Audio Divider/Combiner with Ground Lift

Generally, I much prefer them to using any active splitter. The more transformers in the path, the merrier ...
Old 20th December 2010
  #6
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AndyFromDenver's Avatar
Awesome, thanks everybody!
So it looks like a doable thing.
I know my friend (who mixes all my stuff) would say to just run out and back in, I just thought it would be fun and speedy to handle it in one go. I kind of like committing to tape, but you know, not on the first date!
I'll look into that product mentioned.

in tha Middle East. (remember that fun saying?)
Old 20th December 2010
  #7
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Get a cheap line mixer with 4 busses or 4 aux sends or at least 2 aux sends and a direct out or just use it if you have one. :P

1 --> direct/aux (dry)
Mic -> Pre -> mixer -> |
2 --> aux send -> EFX

Then out to the channels on the interface.

Probably the best way to keep your signal constant, and you can inject your effects better that way.

The REV-7 also seems like a really poor reverb unit. I've never used it but I checked the specs and it only goes up to 12 khz and samples at 16 bit. It might be okay on pianos, strings, and some drums but I'd recon it would have very poor transients.
Old 20th December 2010
  #8
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AndyFromDenver's Avatar
Would a cheap line mixer degrade the quality? Or not noticeably so.
Old 20th December 2010
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyFromDenver View Post
Would a cheap line mixer degrade the quality? Or not noticeably so.
It really depends on how it handles line level signals. Most boards, even behringer handle line level signals just fine. When you get into preamping microphones and stuff like that is when the quality starts to crap out because of the lack of proper amplification circuitry. When a signal is already up there in voltage, it doesn't matter as much as long as you got a SNR of at least -80 db and a THD of .01 percent or less. You're hard pressed to even find those specs on a bad console, we are really babied in the pro audio community when it comes to things like that. Even some synth hardware outputs don't even have those specs.

I wouldn't get anything old though. Old basic utility mixers suck balls. Of course old good gear (neves, etc) rule but old cheap consoles really are horrible compared to what we have now in the aftermath of a 20 year specification war.

Allen and Heath ZED-14 14-Channel Mixer at zZounds

Something like this would probably do you just fine.
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