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How to get a hat to "hiss"? Multi-Ef­fects Plugins
Old 17th December 2010
  #1
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Cursed Lemon's Avatar
How to get a hat to "hiss"?

I'm just wondering how you guys go about getting a "hissy" hi-hat, instead of one that just...well, sounds like two cymbals being banged on by a stick.

I'm talking a Metallica "Sad But True" type of thing.
Old 17th December 2010
  #2
Gear Addict
 

Size of cymbals, HP filter, high eq boost, played slightly open. Not familiar with the Metallica example though.
Old 17th December 2010
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
Yfoiler's Avatar
I've always thought thin Paiste's hiss better than most, and they sure do it for me in a "Purdie" sort of way...
Old 17th December 2010
  #4
Gear Maniac
 

Just subtractive EQ’ing and HP Filtering does the job. Perhaps add a particular reverb that would add that “hiss” type of sound as well? Plates have pretty high frequency content; try starting out with presets and craft it from there.

It’s also how you mic... make sure that you are not aiming the mic towards the bell (YUCKY sound!)
I tend to mic the HH’s away from the rest of the kit as well (facing outward to around a 125º angle or such, depending if I am mic’ing from the top or bottom.)

Just experiment and see what you come up with!
Old 17th December 2010
  #5
member no 666
 
Fletcher's Avatar
Its the way the player plays the instrument - ya can't make that sound with machines.
Old 17th December 2010
  #6
Gear Head
 

Not sure if this is helpful, but it's quite hilarious to play around with.

In the 80's there were synth nerds that sidechained a noise gate inserted on a (preferably white) noise generator (which was filtered etc to fit the song).

Basically, this gave the drum machine hats more sustain and a lofi reverb effect.

The noise gate in logic has an envelope to make things even more flexible. Try it sometime
Old 17th December 2010
  #7
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Ain't Nobody's Avatar
 

Sounds to me like you're talking more about technique. Not familiar with that song, but in the genre, it's quite popular to strike the edge of the hats with the side of the stick. That combined with a closed but relatively loose degree of foot pressure = hiss.

Generally, this works better for me when I'm playing thinner hats.
Old 17th December 2010
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apollo Soul View Post
in the genre, it's quite popular to strike the edge of the hats with the side of the stick.
At the end of the night it always looks like an army of beavers had a go at the sticks.
Old 17th December 2010
  #9
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Ain't Nobody's Avatar
 

Yeah. That's how I used to play... 20 years ago.

Back when I thought it wasn't a good jam session unless you broke a couple sticks.

Broke so many, in fact, that I went out and bought some sort of hard polymer sticks.

... and found out it's quite a bit MORE expensive to replace ripped cymbals.




Rock on.
Old 17th December 2010
  #10
Lives for gear
 

You can order hi-hat cymbals with rivets on them...
Old 17th December 2010
  #11
hit it with a snake?
Old 17th December 2010
  #12
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12ax7's Avatar
 

.
Let the OH's catch most of your hi-hat sound.

...But also mic the hi-hat from underneath with a dynamic omni (like a 635a), and put it in the mix and dial it in. (Might want to flip polarity on it.)

Then, 'mult' the raw signal from this mic into another channel (for a parallel), and put a de-esser before a cheap EQ (think "Mackie") for that channel, and do a narrow peak boost @ around 5.5K, then a light de-esser after it as well.

Then blend all that to taste. (Doesn't take much of those two extra channels to do the trick.)

Sometimes a cheap EQ with a narrow boost 'ringing' into a HF limiter as a parallel process will give you that squishy, squeezy, hissy thang.

Sometimes when doing this, it helps to also find the "chucky" noise from the hat in the low-midrange, and put a narrow, peaky boost there as well. (Kinda gives the "sizzle" something to "push against", so to speak.)

...Just my $0.02...

.
Old 17th December 2010
  #13
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camerondye's Avatar
 

I agree it's in technique, not beating the crap out of them. Heavy HP'ing helps and Mastersound hihats seem to help move into that direction. Although it might be they're so expensive that drummers don't want to hit them as hard.
cam
Old 17th December 2010
  #14
Gear Maniac
 

good topic!
i've been interested in this question for some time as well.

would you say that the approaches discussed here yield results that resemble the hihat sound on the new atheist album?

listen to the first track "second to sun" on their myspace site:

Atheist on Myspace Music - Free Streaming MP3s, Pictures & Music Videos

this is one of the most processed hihat i've heard.

it's metal so be aware

thanks!
Old 17th December 2010
  #15
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filipv's Avatar
Boost 10-11 kHz. Be careful not to overdo it.
Old 17th December 2010
  #16
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audiogeek's Avatar
 

Yup, it's as much the overheads as the hi-hat mic. You've got to run a HPF, and significantly hype the highs on both...

I usually have good luck using 13" hats, point a SDC towards their edge, and boost around 12kHz significantly. I tend to use the overhead tracks more, but will season it with the hi-hat track as desired.
Old 17th December 2010
  #17
Gear Addict
 

I was at a drum clinic a number of years ago, and I think it was the Guns n Roses drummer at the time who said that a lot of rock bands add a cabasa to augment the HH.

~Jay
Old 17th December 2010
  #18
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How to get a hat to "hiss"?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher
Its the way the player plays the instrument - ya can't make that sound with machines.
Thumbsup

Who did that album? Whenever I hear or think of metallica I say to myself "ADA MP1".
Old 18th December 2010
  #19
Gear Guru
 

The top hat needs to be 'slightly loose' on the clutch, able to flop from side to side just a little. There is a very narrow sweet spot for this.

The drummer needs to have good left foot control, able to open the hats a 'Goldilocks' amount and continually adjust it as he plays. This is not left foot 'speed' but more 'precision' - treating the HH pedal as a 'controller'. Obviously stick technique, not bashing etc.

You can change the size of the hats, the position of the mics and frequency of the EQ all you want, but Fletcher is right, if the drummer isn't playing them that way, you aren't going to be satisfied.
Old 18th December 2010
  #20
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Halloween's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by antstudio View Post
hit it with a snake?
Took the words from right out my brain.
Old 18th December 2010
  #21
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FreshSkweez's Avatar
 

While it depends of course on how it's being played I've found that the following often helps me accentuate the 'hiss':

1. Fast compression in generous amounts to bring the transient down and the sustain part of the sound up.
2. Short delay-based effects (a flanger in my case) help thicken, prolong and even out hi-hats
3. A short plate may also help if used tastefully.

My 3 c.
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