The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
The original Stereo/Blumlein ribbon microphone: Lustraphone "Stereo plus" VR65
Old 15th September 2010
  #1
Lives for gear
 
Santiago's Avatar
 

The original Stereo/Blumlein ribbon microphone: Lustraphone "Stereo plus" VR65

I have recently bought this microphone from a popular internet auctions site. It is a coincident stereo ribbon microphone, with two ribbons in one cylindrical body, where the angle of the ribbons can be adjusted from 0 to 100 degrees. It therefore can be used to pick up sound in a Blumlein pattern.

I don't have a camera to hand, but it looks like this (pic from Saturn Sound, not of my actual microphone):

The original Stereo/Blumlein ribbon microphone: Lustraphone "Stereo plus" VR65-lustraphone-stereoplus-vr-65ns.jpg

http://www.saturn-sound.com/images/l...%20vr-65ns.jpg

As you can see it looks a lot like the Royer SF-12, and it predates the Beo-Mic BM5 by Bang and Olufsen. The Lustraphone Stereoplus VR65 was presented in the London Audio Fair in 1959 and was in full production by 1960, while the Beo-Mic was produced from 1961 onwards. The designer was an Austrian called George Pontzen, who worked many years for Lustraphone.

Lustraphone made microphones for ree-to-reel tape recorders but this was a fairly expensive microphone at the time. The retail price for the original version was around £31 in 1959 (£15 for the simpler version VR65/NS), which was quite pricey. In comparison an STC 4038 had a retail price of £43 in 1963 (according to the list price on the Coutant website: STC brochures).

It has a similar frequency response to the Beo-Mic (and the ribbon motors seem very similar). It is supposed to be flat between 40hz and 13khz. I have found a great review from Gramophone magazine, where the author ABs the mic with an AKG C12 to test the frequency response and experiments with using it to record an orchestra. He concludes that the Stereoplus's response went down to 30hz and sloped down gently after 13khz, being about 6 db down by 16khz.

Here is the 4-page review from the archives of Gramophone magazine (the archives are great for information on old and obscure British gear):

Article | Coming Soon | Page*98 - August*1960 - Gramophone Archive

The microphone is low impedance (and presumably the misc have internal transformers) but there are also two external in-line transformers (model TS/50F, whatever that means) to bring the impedance up to hi-z.

Last night I recorded some tests with mine. The ribbons seem to be in perfect condition (the previous owner had had it from new and had stored it carefully for the last few years) and the frequency range seems as advertised. The spacial sound of the Blumlein configurarion (when the two ribbons are at 90 degrees to each other) is quite striking.

On the other hand, at the moment the signal is very noisy because I don't have an appropriate input for low output hi-z microphones in my RME fireface (so I had to connect the mics to two passive DIs and then connect those to the microphone pre-amps). I will re-wire the connector to two xlr connectors and by-pass the two external hi-z transformers, I'm hoping there will be an earth connection in the lead, otherwise that will need to be fixed.

I'm fairly busy now, but I hope to post samples of the mic post-rewiring and some pics over the weekend...

If anyone knows anything about this mic, please share it!
Old 18th September 2010
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Santiago's Avatar
 

Hmm..From the lack of replies it looks like there is not that much interest in these old ribbons around here.

oh well... if someone gets one of these at least they can find out something about it here...

FWIW I have rewired the mic to XLR and it is now not noisy at all. However, in true old ribbon microphone fashion, its output is very low. When recording quiet instruments you start hear some background hiss from my RME Fireface pre-amps.

Here is a quick audio demo of me playing an archtop acoustic and singing Cocaine Blues through it. It gives an idea of the sound of the mic on a Blumlein configuration.

(Apologies for the performance, bad acoustics and laptop ventilator hum in the background!)
Attached Files

Cocaine blues.mp3 (1.60 MB, 2916 views)

Old 19th September 2010
  #3
Gear Head
 

I'm just checking this out on laptop speakers, but wow! It's a beautiful sounding mic! I'm about to listen on my Beyer DT 880s...
Old 19th September 2010
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Santiago's Avatar
 

Hey, glad you like it.

I have made a new recording, this time with my half-cracked old Granton glockenspiel.

In the beginning I just play all the notes to give an idea of the stereo spread.

I love ribbons on glockenspiel because they add a lot of body, and this one does sound quite nice. I would love to try it on a better room to get a nice room sound from the figure 8s.
Attached Files

Lustraphone vr65 Glockenspiel.mp3 (1.23 MB, 3993 views)

Old 19th September 2010
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Teddy Ray's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Santiago View Post
I have recently bought this microphone from a popular internet auctions site. It is a coincident stereo ribbon microphone, with two ribbons in one cylindrical body, where the angle of the ribbons can be adjusted from 0 to 100 degrees. It therefore can be used to pick up sound in a Blumlein pattern.

I don't have a camera to hand, but it looks like this (pic from Saturn Sound, not of my actual microphone):

Attachment 192762

http://www.saturn-sound.com/images/l...%20vr-65ns.jpg

As you can see it looks a lot like the Royer SF-12, and it predates the Beo-Mic BM5 by Bang and Olufsen. The Lustraphone Stereoplus VR65 was presented in the London Audio Fair in 1959 and was in full production by 1960, while the Beo-Mic was produced from 1961 onwards. Lustraphone made microphones for ree-to-reel tape recorders but this was a fairly expensive microphone at the time. The retail price for the original version was around £31 in 1959 (£15 for the simpler version VR65/NS), which was quite pricey. In comparison an STC 4038 had a retail price of £43 in 1963 (according to the list price on the Coutant website: STC brochures).

It has a similar frequency response to the Beo-Mic (and the ribbon motors seem very similar). It is supposed to be flat between 40hz and 13khz. I have found a great review from Gramophone magazine, where the author ABs the mic with an AKG C12 to test the frequency response and experiments with using it to record an orchestra. He concludes that the Stereoplus's response went down to 30hz and sloped down gently after 13khz, being about 6 db down by 16khz.

Here is the 4-page review from the archives of Gramophone magazine (the archives are great for information on old and obscure British gear):

Article | Coming Soon | Page*98 - August*1960 - Gramophone Archive

The microphone is low impedance (and presumably the misc have internal transformers) but there are also two external in-line transformers (model TS/50F, whatever that means) to bring the impedance up to hi-z.

Last night I recorded some tests with mine. The ribbons seem to be in perfect condition (the previous owner had had it from new and had stored it carefully for the last few years) and the frequency range seems as advertised. The spacial sound of the Blumlein configurarion (when the two ribbons are at 90 degrees to each other) is quite striking.

On the other hand, at the moment the signal is very noisy because I don't have an appropriate input for low output hi-z microphones in my RME fireface (so I had to connect the mics to two passive DIs and then connect those to the microphone pre-amps). I will re-wire the connector to two xlr connectors and by-pass the two external hi-z transformers, I'm hoping there will be an earth connection in the lead, otherwise that will need to be fixed.

I'm fairly busy now, but I hope to post samples of the mic post-rewiring and some pics over the weekend...

If anyone knows anything about this mic, please share it!
Yes, blumlein is a fantastic technique. Great sound, btw. Doesn't sound like an old mic at all... very impressive.

Dont know if you know about these recordings, but if you want to hear some tremendous examples of the blumlein technique in action, do yourself a favor and check out anything on Waterlily Acoustics or Opus 3 records. They use only this techique, (no more mics) in great acoustics..



particularly, the recordings

"A MEETING BY THE RIVER" A Meeting By the River: Ry Cooder: Amazon.co.uk: Music

and on OPUS 3-- ERIC BIBB AND NEEDED TIME-SPIRIT AND THE BLUES

The Spirit and the Blues: Eric Bibb: Amazon.co.uk: Music


stunning examples of recordings in blumlein-- no edits, no post processing...just great music wonderfully recorded..
Old 19th September 2010
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Santiago's Avatar
 

Thanks for those recommendations, I will listen to them.

The amazon clips of the Eric Bibb record I have found sound fantastic! - I love recordings that have a sense of space.

I was already aware of one recording by Waterlily Acoustics, Jon Hassell's Fascinoma, which features Ry Cooder too. It's one of my favourite Jon Hassell records and is highly recommended:

YouTube - Jon Hassell - Nature Boy

Amazon.com: Fascinoma: Jon Hassell: Music
Old 19th September 2010
  #7
Lives for gear
 
Teddy Ray's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Santiago View Post
Thanks for those recommendations, I will listen to them.

The amazon clips of the Eric Bibb record I have found sound fantastic! - I love recordings that have a sense of space.

I was already aware of one recording by Waterlily Acoustics, Jon Hassell's Fascinoma, which features Ry Cooder too. It's one of my favourite Jon Hassell records and is highly recommended:

YouTube - Jon Hassell - Nature Boy

Amazon.com: Fascinoma: Jon Hassell: Music
LOVE the Fascinoma

I must also reccomend Mapleshade Records(also two mics, no processing)

Clifford Jordan - Live at Ethels..

Mapleshade Records - Clifford Jordan Quartet

and one more OPUS 3 record--

TINY ISLAND

http://www.amazon.com/o/ASIN/B0000E6...etteraddons-20

again, no processing...two mics only
Old 20th September 2010
  #8
Lives for gear
 
Santiago's Avatar
 

Wow, thanks, that's a lot of great music to discover... I listened a bit to both records, very impressive.

I can also recommend this song by the band Tindersticks, it was recorded live with orchestra at Abbey Road (they don't specify which studio) on one microphone

Free Music, Listen to Music Free

It's on their second album, which is also really great. It has a very dark smoky mood.

I have now made a couple of pics of the Lustraphone VR65 microphone during the glockenspiel recording and after:

The original Stereo/Blumlein ribbon microphone: Lustraphone "Stereo plus" VR65-lustraphone-vr65-003.jpg

The original Stereo/Blumlein ribbon microphone: Lustraphone "Stereo plus" VR65-lustraphone-vr65-001.jpg
Old 21st September 2010
  #9
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teddy Ray View Post
particularly, the recordings

and on OPUS 3-- ERIC BIBB AND NEEDED TIME-SPIRIT AND THE BLUES

The Spirit and the Blues: Eric Bibb: Amazon.co.uk: Music


stunning examples of recordings in blumlein-- no edits, no post processing...just great music wonderfully recorded..
Listening to this right now. Beautiful stuff. Great sound.
Old 21st September 2010
  #10
Gear Addict
 
rjacobsen's Avatar
 

Very interesting thread, got to love those old ribbon mics!

rjacobsen
Old 21st September 2010
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Teddy Ray's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Santiago View Post
Wow, thanks, that's a lot of great music to discover... I listened a bit to both records, very impressive.

I can also recommend this song by the band Tindersticks, it was recorded live with orchestra at Abbey Road (they don't specify which studio) on one microphone

Free Music, Listen to Music Free

It's on their second album, which is also really great. It has a very dark smoky mood.

I have now made a couple of pics of the Lustraphone VR65 microphone during the glockenspiel recording and after:

Attachment 193671

Attachment 193672
I love the tindersticks(and Lambchop, who has a similar sound).. great pics!!


John Mellencamps new one was recorded with one mic too...

also..

the Cowboy Junkies-- Trinity Sessions-- a soundfield mic, straight to DAT.

sounds great.

also..

Yarlung Records Yarlung Records - new artists, classic music
There is a distinct breed of recording connoisseur that feels the best-recorded sound comes from the least amount of equipment. One must use the fewest microphones required to capture the sound, and they must be placed in perfect locations. This is the “less is more,” “minimalist,” or “purist” school. Many microphones, multiple-track mixers, miles of microphone cable can add noise and what audiophiles call a blanket over the sound and over the music. This makes the music seem distant and un-engaging. There are extraordinary recordings made this way. But they are rare, and their engineers walk on water.
In these most recent Yarlung Records releases, I use either one stereo or two mono vacuum tube microphones, which record directly to two tracks (left and right, for stereo playback). We use microphones like the legendary AKG C-24, and matched Neumann U-47s. I believe that these minimalist recording techniques will give you, the listener, the most transparent sound, the most accurate soundstage and the most life-like ambiance of these great artists in a concert hall.
We use customized vacuum tube microphone preamplifiers instead of a mixer, and our custom interconnect cables. I record analog tape and high definition digital audio (in this case 176,400 samples per second and 24 bit depth). Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray mastered these CDs directly from the digital media, re-sampled to 44.1 kilohertz and dithered to 16 bits so that you can play them on a modern CD player. We hope you enjoy them!

MA recordings. Welcome to MA Recordings Online

been informed that it was possible to put 1 hour and 49 minutes of DSD Stereo on a single SACD disc, as well as 74 minutes on the CD layer, in addition to the fact that I wanted to test the "SACD waters", I decided to attempt history by producing the first 3 hour music disc!
We introduced "MAonSA" at the 2006 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas and I was pleasantly surprised to hear from the attendees that I spoke to that many of them own SACD capable players. I suppose that some listeners do not know however, that a number of the (perhaps less expensive) Universal players, while they do play SACD, do not actually output DSD sound as the DSD signal is first converted to high-sampled PCM before being output in the analog domain. Sound like a farce? With THAT in mind, should MA have released a DVD-Audio sampler? Well, since SACD is much more popular than DVD-A, we are sort of stuck, I guess. But, it still is true that the dedicated, truly HI-END SACD players really do output pure DSD sound.
In any case, I thought that, if the SACD format sounded as good as many people think it does, that there should be enough listeners out there that may want to hear MA in a supposedly "better sounding format" than normal Redbook CD. There could also be some people out there not yet aware of MA, but who may develop interest because of this sampler. So, rather than just release a single album in the SACD format, I thought that the sampler would be the way to go and I would hear from many of you as to your thoughts on the music, the quality of this disc, etc. AND, I thought the novelty of being more than three hours long, would be enticing as well.
I should perhaps convey however, what I feel has "happened" to the newly remastered music on the SACD layer of this disc. As far as my aging ears can tell, the music is expressed more delicately, with increased transparency and finesse. The low end is still there, while the presentation is more elegant. There are little things which I noticed for the first time upon listening to this SACD. This is encouraging, to say the least. Of course, the presentation will vary, depending on the machine on which it is heard, as well as the other audio components. I first auditioned this disc on an EMM Labs/Ed Meitner modified Philips 1000 Universal player which does output true DSD sonics, with STAX 404 headphones and a discontinued vacuum tube driver unit.
I have to admit that since the original recordings were all done in the PCM format, this is not a true representation of pure DSD sound. We did however, use what we think is the best gear available, including a DCS 974 Digital to Digital converter, the Rolls Royce (both being from the UK!) of conversion and digital audio in general. We used a SADIE Digital Audio Work Station (also from the UK) which both I and mastering engineer Atsuo Fujita feel does little if anything to alter the original sonics of the master source and is therefore the best out there. We were also blessed with the full cooperation of Gabi van der Kley, the brains behind and owner of CYRSTAL CABLE in The Netherlands. She sent us handcrafted, digital cables to enable us to transfer data from the original master recorders, such as the "D-07A" 96 kHz Pioneer DAT and/or Fostex DV40 DVD-Ram Recorder, thru the DCS 974 and into the SADIE. Of paramount importance to us was the Stereo BNC to 25 D-SUB connector cable linking the DCS 974 to the SADIE. Unfortunately, digital audio workstations can be rather large and there is not much room to include true BNC connections on the rear panels; therefore the less than perfect 25 D-SUB connection. All computer workstations, are supplied with, at best, cabling that leaves much to be desired. We, on the other hand, had CRYSTAL! In any case, we went for "quality" throughout, using the best cables and the best gear we could get our hands on. I should emphasize that the "elegance" in the presentation of the music is very likely due to our use of CRYSTAL CABLE throughout the preparation of this disc.
As for the tracks themselves, I have chosen not to write here in detail about each one, there being 32 complete tracks in total! Rather, the listener will find all the info she or he needs on the MA site, including all the covers, as well as data, etc. If there are any of you out there who require more information and input from us, please feel free to inquire via:

[email protected] The microphones shown on the cover of this disc, designed and hand constructed by Japanese audiophile and designer Junichi Yonetani, are unique to MA Recordings. Mr. Yonetani has been, over the years, a very enthusiastic supporter of MA, for which I thank him dearly.
The microphones are DC powered, running on four 9 volt batteries. Differentiating them from the common, low level, phantom power variety of microphone, they are line level. Traditional low level microphone cables are done away with completely as they are no longer necessary. The outputs of the MA microphones are fed directly to the recording device, or Analog to Digital converter, in the case of digital recording.
Of utmost importance are the diaphragms utilized to capture sound waves. The MA microphones feature the same diaphragms used in the famous DPA 4003 and DPA 4006 series microphones from Denmark. (www.dpamicrophones.com)
The body of each MA microphone was machined from a solid piece of brass, then plated with rhodium. Each microphone weighs 701 grams with the standard DPA silver grid. The microphones in the photo are shown with the DPA "Nose Cone" which may be used in place of the silver grid to render the microphones slightly more omnidirectional in character than with the silver grid.
Being as heavy as they are, the MA microphones require custom made holders, made from steel pipe. In order to make fine adjustments in positioning, the holders are fastened onto miniature balljoints designed for professional photography. The ball joints are in turn, placed on an aluminum "stereo bar" which is supported by a professional tripod designed for still photography.
The original sampling rates on the DSD layer tracks are as follows:
Track 1) M070A/Gitana, from "llama" by Silvia Perez Cruz & Ravid Goldschmidt: 88.2 kHz

Track 2) M071A/Improvisation on a Love Song, from "A Night in Budapest" by Kalman Olah and Friends: 88.2 kHz

Track 3) M071A/Improvisation on a Love Song, from "A Night in Budapest" by Kalman Olah and Friends: 88.2 kHz

Track 4) M062A/Taquito Militar, from "La Segunda" by Sera Una Noche: 176.4 kHz

Track 5) M069A/Prelude - Allemande - Sarabande, from Suite en La mineur, by Marin Marais, performed by Andrea De Carlo: 176.4 kHz

Track 6) M068A/Variaciones sobre el "Carnaval de Venecia" de Niccolo Paganini by F. Tarrega, performed by Gzegorz Krawiez: 96 kHz

Track 7) M049A/Passos, from "Almas" by Joao Paolo: 96 kHz

Track 8) M044A/Ajde da li znaes pametis Milice, from "Krushevo" by Vlatko Stefanovski & Miroslav Tadic: 96 kHz

Track 9) M052A/Malena, from "Sera una Noche" by Sera Una Noche: 96 kHz

Track 10) M045A/Certeza, from "O Exilio" by Joao Paolo: 96 kHz

Track 11) M046A/Meu Amor deu um Lenco, from "Senhora da Lapa" by Maria Ana Bobone: 96 kHz

Track 12) M026A/Murakkaz Ah Ya Muddasin, from "The Splendour of Al Andalus" by Calamus: 96 kHz

Track 13) M025A/Noche Maravillosa, from "Salterio" by Begona Olavide: 96 kHz

Track 14) M043A/Terra Da Esperanca Perdida, from "Sete Ondas" by Mauro Refosco: 96 kHz

Track 15) M058A/Vitamin C, from "Old School" by Peter Epstein: 96 kHz

Track 16) M029A/Jovano Jovanke, from "Old Country" by Miroslav Tadic & Howard Levy: 96 kHz

Track 17) M057A/Esquina, from "Esquina" by Joao Paolo & Peter Epstein: 96 kHz

Track 18) M047A/Solace from "Solus" by Peter Epstein: 96 kHz

Track 19) Chopin's Berceuse, performed by Gabriella Kafer at Belvarosi Szent Mihaly Templom, Budapest: 88.2 kHz (no release date for this recording)

For information about Crystal Cable: www.crystalcable.com
For information about DCS: www.dcsltd.co.uk
For information about SADIE: www.sadie.com
For information about the Hang, the mysterious metallic instrument heard on the first track on the DSD layer: www.hangfan.co.uk


and Tacet TACET-Website - english

The sound on all Tacet recordings is achieved by completely natural means. The instruments or voices must have a good sound of their own. And before (!) the recording is started, the acoustic event must be as good as it can possibly get.

Virtually no devices or adjustments (filters, limiters, digital echo etc.) are used which could alter the sound synthetically. The art of the Tacet tonmeister (sound engineer) is not to manipulate the sound event. The art of the Tacet tonmeister is a tricky one: to listen to the music - and do everything possible to develop it to its best extent.

As, however, a recording is impossible without the use of electronic equipment, Tacet uses the very best equipment on the market. The new developments are tested personally. For example: the latest A/D converter, further developments in dummy head stereophony, high definition sound carrier formats, etc.....

But Tacet also makes use of tried and tested older technology - wherever this is clearly superior to the newer equipment. For example, valve microphones are better for some recordings than microphones developed more recently. But what is quite new is the Tacet method of positioning the microphones: that is an art in itself.

And cutting is only done where the music permits it. Of course one cannot normally hear arbitrary cuts, but many recordings nowadays convey a somewhat disjointed impression: as if the artist had concentrated more on the details than on the whole. With all Tacet recordings one notices that they sound as if they have come from one mould. The liveliness of the recordings has been retained - one of the aims of Tacet's recording policy.

The aim of the composition is supported by the type of individual recording technique. The performers' ideas are clarified. For example: with an orchestral work by W. A. Mozart, as a rule it does not make sense to emphasise the wind instruments specifically with the aid of a large number of microphones: the mixture of sounds - a decisive component in Mozart's instrumentation - would get lost. Different microphones are not used just for the fun of it, but as the result of careful thought about each piece of music and the best way of putting it across.

The Tacet sound has been described as sensuous and subtle at the same time. Anyone wishing to follow the thoughts behind Tacet recording technique piece by piece can refer to the Tacet Production no. 17: "The Microphone". The "star" examples of sound, a variety of old-fashioned valve microphones, are described in it in detail.

But the real audiophile (pleasing to the ear) recordings do not rely on recording technology alone, but are dependent on excellent musicians playing excellent recordings and giving their very best. Tacet offers all this in plenty.

Ulrich Oesterle
Old 24th November 2010
  #12
Gear Head
 

Fatntastic mic! A producer bought one of these to work recently, used it just in front of the drums and for the sound of the band I wouldn't have been all that worried if that was the only mic we had up!

Great Glock sound, I have a very similar instrument to yours but I can't get anywhere near the same fullness and sustain out of it, I'm only using a cascade fathead but I figure I should be able to get roughly in the same ballpark. Was this recording flat and unprocessed? What were the beaters you used? I can't think of any other variations I may have missed that would effect the sound so dramitacally compared to mine!
Old 2nd December 2010
  #13
Lives for gear
 
Santiago's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by OMorgan View Post
Fatntastic mic! A producer bought one of these to work recently, used it just in front of the drums and for the sound of the band I wouldn't have been all that worried if that was the only mic we had up!

Great Glock sound, I have a very similar instrument to yours but I can't get anywhere near the same fullness and sustain out of it, I'm only using a cascade fathead but I figure I should be able to get roughly in the same ballpark. Was this recording flat and unprocessed? What were the beaters you used? I can't think of any other variations I may have missed that would effect the sound so dramitacally compared to mine!
Hi! that sounds really interesting. I can't wait to try my microphone on drums or a full-band.

In terms of the glock sound, it is unprocessed, the Lustraphone vr65 plugged straight into my RME fireface and no post-processing eq, compression or effects.

As you see, the microphone is very close to the metal bars, which helps give the sound this great proximity effect that is typical of ribbon microphones. I originally tried to place it even closer to the bars, but then the attack of the beaters had too much of a bass "thump", so I backed it off a little.

So I suppose the secret is just the old glockenspiel (I think it was made by Granton in the UK, they produced some glocks for Hohner as well) and its rather fat bars and the beaters. Since you say your glockenspiel is similar, I suppose it must be the beaters.

I use rubber-tipped beaters. I like them a lot because they do not have much or an "ping" attack harmonic, they just give you the fundamental note.

I bought them in a shop in Cambridge some time ago, but can't remember what brand they are, or if they were originally for glockenspiel or rather for xylophone. I suppose any soft-ish rubber beater will give you this type of sound.

In any case, I think it is worth it to get a variety of beaters, they are cheap and you can use them to get a range of sounds out of acoustic instruments.
Old 17th April 2011
  #14
bee
Lives for gear
 
bee's Avatar
 

I know this is a old thread but thanks for sharing this info.That mic sounds wonderful.thumbsup
Old 17th November 2011
  #15
Lives for gear
 
Santiago's Avatar
 

Sighting of a VR 65 being used for re-amping at EVE studios. They seem to have connected it to a reel-to-reel player...

Twitter
Old 2nd February 2012
  #16
Lives for gear
 
Santiago's Avatar
 

I have found the patent for this microphone, including that for the switching box that formed part of the first version (mine is the cheaper latter version without the switching box). It allowed for the mics to work in stereo or low-noise mono humbucking mode amongst other possibilities. One can replicate that by changing the orientation of the mics and the phase of the recorded tracks.

http://worldwide.espacenet.com/publi...031A&KC=A&ND=1

I should try that at some point, so far I've only used this mic for blumlein stereo.

The patent application was filed in 1959 (when and published in 1961. I think this pre-dates the B&O mic, although more info would probably be necessary.
Old 2nd February 2012
  #17
Gear Addict
 
Elof's Avatar
 

Beautiful sounds!
Especially liking the glockenspiel.
I´m also a fan of blumlein, with condensers aswell.
I will be on the lookout for this mic from now on...
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump