The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Best mixing headphones!
Old 13th November 2015
  #2971
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abolla View Post
I'm looking into the M2000s by Studiospares, as even though they make them in-house they have rave reviews and are the cheapest I've seen. I was put onto them by someone who has the M1000s for tracking.

The link is here for those who are wondering what they are
https://www.studiospares.com/Headpho...nes_448780.htm
"Designed for professional mixing and mastering" - it's nice to read that, and hopefully, they can find distributors in the USA and Canada shortly.

http://proaudioblog.co.uk/2013/03/m2...chain-studios/

http://proaudioblog.co.uk/2013/03/mo...00-headphones/
Old 13th November 2015
  #2972
Gear Guru
Grado 60's are on a Massdrop promo. I love Grados.... I think you can adapt your hearing to what you're used to as long as your consistant. I swap between Grados and ATH 50's. Affordable and really not too many surprises when I get into a real monitoring situation. Disclaimer, musician not a pro!....
Old 15th November 2015
  #2973
Lives for gear
 
Slikjmuzik's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by eldon2975 View Post
"Designed for professional mixing and mastering" - it's nice to read that, and hopefully, they can find distributors in the USA and Canada shortly.

http://proaudioblog.co.uk/2013/03/m2...chain-studios/

http://proaudioblog.co.uk/2013/03/mo...00-headphones/
Wow, think I may have found a new pair of mixing headphones...69 pounds is only about $106...what else should I consider as far as total cost to get to Florida, anyone know?
Old 15th November 2015
  #2974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slikjmuzik View Post
Wow, think I may have found a new pair of mixing headphones...69 pounds is only about $106...what else should I consider as far as total cost to get to Florida, anyone know?
Those look like a rebadge of Brainwavz HM5. They get good review fot the price in the general audio community. I've never heard of anyone using them for audio work. I wouldn't get my hopes up too much, they measure with a dip around 300Hz.
Old 16th November 2015
  #2975
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadToNever View Post
I've never heard of anyone using them for audio work. I wouldn't get my hopes up too much, they measure with a dip around 300Hz.
Apart from this guy who says they are the best mixing headphones he's ever used. http://proaudioblog.co.uk/2013/03/m2...chain-studios/

They may not be the same as those you mentioned. The bodies, yes but the drivers etc may be totally different. The closed back version is meant to be good as well.
Old 16th November 2015
  #2976
Lives for gear
 

Is anyone working successfully with the ATH-M 70's?
Also, just to add fuel to the fire, I see Yamaha are bringing out a new studio model in Jan 2016.
Cheers, Ross
Old 16th November 2015
  #2977
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddirt View Post
Also, just to add fuel to the fire, I see Yamaha are bringing out a new studio model in Jan 2016.
Cheers, Ross
Wow really? Can we have more info on it ?
Old 17th November 2015
  #2978
Lives for gear
 
eightyeightkeys's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadToNever View Post
..... I wouldn't get my hopes up too much, they measure with a dip around 300Hz.
All headphones have dips and peaks across the entire spectrum. If you look at any/all the compensation curves in the Sonarworks Headphone calibration software, you'd be surprised you're not looking at a pencil drawing of the Himalayas.

Also, I have two of the headphones that Sonarworks provides curves for. Flat on one set sounds completely different than flat on another set. "Flat" means very little. "Useful" is the key.
Old 17th November 2015
  #2979
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightyeightkeys View Post
All headphones have dips and peaks across the entire spectrum. If you look at any/all the compensation curves in the Sonarworks Headphone calibration software, you'd be surprised you're not looking at a pencil drawing of the Himalayas.

Also, I have two of the headphones that Sonarworks provides curves for. Flat on one set sounds completely different than flat on another set. "Flat" means very little. "Useful" is the key.
Who said anything about flat?
Old 18th November 2015
  #2980
Lives for gear
 
eightyeightkeys's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadToNever View Post
Who said anything about flat?
I stand corrected !
Old 18th November 2015
  #2981
Wow. 100 pages. How about a summary for the up to 200 dollars bracket?
Old 18th November 2015
  #2982
Lives for gear
 
TheBrightSide's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pichi View Post
Wow. 100 pages. How about a summary for the up to 200 dollars bracket?
Can't be easily summed up unfortunately.
According to this thread, every headphone ever made is both terrible and awesome.
That's headphones for ya.
Old 19th November 2015
  #2983
Lives for gear
 
lame pseudonym's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hibakusha View Post
I've always loved headphones, ever since I was a kid, so I find myself doing a lot of work with them, even down to preliminary mixing. But I have to say that, for me personally, I've never done a headphone mix that hasn't been improved in some way by running it through a set of speakers and doing a rebalance.
Not that anyone should listen to me, but I'll do 90% on headphones and tweak it in on speakers. If that gives suboptimum results, oh well. Optimum is a pretty flaky target.
Old 20th November 2015
  #2984
Here for the gear
 

SPL 2Control + most 'above average' headphones do wonders.
Old 20th November 2015
  #2985
Lives for gear
Here is a list of headphones that from reading many posts and reviews from various places I would say are very good for mixing purposes. The best is hard to say, as personal taste always plays a part but these are all meant to be useful. They are all affordable.

Superlux HD668B. Cheap and a little harsh in high end, but generally a good balanced sound. Recommended these to a friend and he is loving them.

Other Superlux models also worth considering too. They base their designs on AKG and Beyer's.

Studiospares M1000 and M2000. Twice the price of Superlux but still cheap.

Audio Technica M50 and M50X. The 50X is pricier than the above phones, but build quality comes into at here. The ATH-M70X and R-70X are phones I'd really like to try. These are twice the price if the M50X though, so getting to the top of the budget I would describe as affordable to most.

AKG K7XX from Massdrop. I own these and live them. My mixes have improved a lot. Practically the same as the K712 (actually a Chinese made 702AE) at nearly half the price. Not many left as limited edition.

AKG K712. 702, Q701.

Sennheiser HD600 and HD650.

Beyer Dynamic DT880

Then the Shure and KRK models get a kit of praise too, and the Blue MoFi and New Lola are said to be good. I saw the MoFi on limited sale for $250 which seemed a good buy as this is the price if the amp less Lola's.

There you go, a bit of a round up but certainly not covering all the good headphones, just ones at decent price that seen to get lots if praise. I only have Beyer DT770 Pro's and AKG K7XX and some Sennheiser HD485's though, do can't comment on others from personal experience.
Old 20th November 2015
  #2986
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Funk View Post

Superlux HD668B. Cheap and a little harsh in high end, but generally a good balanced sound. Recommended these to a friend and he is loving them.
Do these really hold up against the others? Under 40 bucks makes them a tempting buy...
Old 20th November 2015
  #2987
Lives for gear
 
Jorg's Avatar
I mix a lot on headphones.

I prefer the Sennheiser HD650 most of the time but also use the Beyerdynamic DT770s occasionally.
Old 20th November 2015
  #2988
Gear Guru
You want cheap and good? Don't know if I mentioned it probably did. Monoprice $20- headphones are great. TapeOp did a review and they are close to the ATH 50's I swear by.... Never heard a better headphone for the price and the bass response is great.
Old 20th November 2015
  #2989
Overall best headphone for mixing under:
50 $ - yamaha rh5ma
100 $ - yamaha rh5ma
300 $ - yamaha rh5ma
500 $ - yamaha rh5ma
1000 $ - yamaha rh5ma
Old 20th November 2015
  #2990
Lives for gear
 
Slikjmuzik's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monitorlove View Post
Overall best headphone for mixing under:
50 $ - yamaha rh5ma
100 $ - yamaha rh5ma
300 $ - yamaha rh5ma
500 $ - yamaha rh5ma
1000 $ - yamaha rh5ma
Gonna have to check them out!
Old 20th November 2015
  #2991
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pichi View Post
Do these really hold up against the others? Under 40 bucks makes them a tempting buy...
Soundwise, yes!....looks, no..... comfort, not really....
build quality, dunno...they're still doing their job after 1 year over here :-)

Can't go wrong with these....
Old 20th November 2015
  #2992
Lives for gear
 
acreil's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Funk View Post
Superlux HD668B. Cheap and a little harsh in high end, but generally a good balanced sound. Recommended these to a friend and he is loving them.
On a whim I bought a number of cheap Chinese headphones. I found that the best performers are the Somic MM185 ($40, very neutral sounding, similar to Sennheiser HD600), Somic MH463 ($50 or $60, warmer sounding but still pretty neutral) and iSK HP-580 ($30, sort of like a more comfortable and more neutral sounding Superlux). And I haven't tried it, but the Takstar Pro 80 is also supposed to be very neutral. I'd say these sound at least as good as most headphones in the $150 range, but the construction isn't great. They're creaky and have microphonic cables, etc. And generally you can forget about getting replacement parts.

Superlux headphones are generally uncomfortable and sound hyped. I think they're useful for checking mixes, just to make sure nothing stands out as having excessive sibilance or sub bass, but they're not particularly accurate overall.
Old 21st November 2015
  #2993
Lives for gear
 
belzrebuth's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by acreil View Post
On a whim I bought a number of cheap Chinese headphones. I found that the best performers are the Somic MM185 ($40, very neutral sounding, similar to Sennheiser HD600), Somic MH463 ($50 or $60, warmer sounding but still pretty neutral)
Valuable info there!
I'm thinking to get the MH463.I didn't know about the MM185.
But since MH643 is their 'flagship' model I may try these first.
They earned some good reviews at head-fi too.

I'm using Superlux HD-660 for quite some time and they're OK for most things and I thought about going DT-770 for closed or HD-600 for open but for the price I 'll probably try the Somic stuff..
Old 21st November 2015
  #2994
rjx
Lives for gear
 
rjx's Avatar
Found this on slickdeals

HD600 - $249
Sennheiser HD600 Audiophile Dynamic Hi-Fi or Professional Stereo Headphone HD600

HD650 - $299
Sennheiser HD650 Audiophile Dynamic Hi-Fi Stereo Headphone HD650

Thought I'd post this in case anyone is interested.
Old 21st November 2015
  #2995
Had the AKG K702's for around 5 years; comfortable headphones with great non-fatiguing sound. They suddenly lost signal on left channel; tried a second cable but the problem is inside the headphone.

With the previous model (K701's) it was possible to gain access to the internal wiring by unscrewing and pulling off the mesh grill on the outside and removing 2 screws to reveal the internal wiring (which usually just needs to be re-soldered); but this isn't possible on the K702. I've tried several methods of removing the mesh but it's either deeply-seated or a special tool is needed to remove it.

I'd appreciate any advice on removing the mesh but I'd also like to advise readers that there is an issue with K702's in this regard.

K702's are not cheap and IMO it should be easier to field-repair them. I don't understand why the design would change from one which allowed access for field-repair/service to one which did not.
Old 21st November 2015
  #2996
Here for the gear
 
Sparklebarf's Avatar
 

I'm using the Ultrasone HFI-580 (~$250)
I've had them for going on 5 years now.

I think the main thing is to actually listen to your mix on a number of different quality systems.
I"ll mix in the studio on my KRK monitors then on my headphones at the gym its sounds like the highs are too high.
So maybe try and pick up a few pairs?
Old 25th November 2015
  #2997
Here for the gear
 

In my experience. When it comes to mixing on headphones, it's all about what you're used to working with and always double check your mixes on some good nearfields when possible.

I made the switch over to beyerdynamic dt 880's from sennheiser about 5 years ago and couldn't be more pleased. The 880's are very comfortable when working over long periods... I found that the sennheiser's made me feel like my head was in a vice and my ears got real sweaty. I also felt that the frequency response was more even due to the semi open drive enclosure.

Lately I've found myself using the byerdynamic dt 770's. I've become very familiar with them since I do a fair amount of location mixing on them and I like the isolation. They're also good if you're trying to get a mix out to a client in a hurry and you have screaming kids in the house. You just gotta be careful with the low end in your mixes since the bass is a little hyped in the 770's.

As stated in lots of earlier posts on this thread... It's not ideal to be making your final mixes on headphones, but I think it can be done if you know your gear. Also be weary about doing anything too extreme when eq'ing or dialing in dynamics... you may have to fly by the dials a little bit to make there isn't anything too wonky in your mix.

Hope this helps. I've been a fan of this thread for years now and it has helped my find a decent pair of "mixing" headphones without breaking the bank.

Cheers!
Old 25th November 2015
  #2998
Lives for gear
 
Lunatique's Avatar
I haven't been following this thread, but I want to post this to help out those who might be new to this whole headphone experience.

The most important advice I can give you all, is the following:

It's extremely rare, or even nearly impossible, to find a pair of headphones, no matter what form factor or price, that will get as close to neutral as a high-end pair of studio monitors in a professionally designed and constructed mastering studio. The differences in our ear canal shapes is one of the reasons, and with headphone drivers so close to our ears, the small differences in our physiology become big ones. Just a few millimeters more/less space in your ear canals can change the resonance peak's frequency, and how much of a peak there is. Most common is about 7 KHz, and for IEMs, how deep the tips can insert will cause changes.

So in light of all that, the most important thing you could ever do for yourself to ensure you are hearing the most accurate and neutral sound, is to do the following:

1) Try to only buy headphones that have reliable measurements done for them. If you cannot find any reliable measurements done by reputable sources (such as Tyll from InnerFidelity), and you have no knowledge or equipment necessary to do the measurement yourself, then it's better to avoid the headphone altogether.

Here's the direct link to the measurements: http://www.innerfidelity.com/headpho...heet-downloads

2) Pick the headphone in your budget that's closest to neutral in terms of measurement. Look at the frequency response, impedance curve, distortion, etc. What you want, is a headphone that's low in distortion so it can handle being EQ'd better, and you want to make sure the impedance level/curve matches your gear. Just because a pair of IEMs might list the impedance as 16 ohms, does not mean it is flat across the frequency range. It might have much lower impedance in the 4 KHz region for example, so that means if your gear cannot match that very low impedance level, you will NOT get the frequency response you're supposed to. The general rule of thumb is that your headphone should be 8x the impedance level of your gear's headphone amp/jack. Many pro audio gear CANNOT match very low impedance/high-sensitivity headphones, so make sure you get a headphone amp that can go as low as possible in impedance (below 1 ohm is ideal).

InnerFidelity's Wall of Fame is one of the best resources available for expert advice on the best headphones in various price ranges: http://www.innerfidelity.com/content...itys-wall-fame

3) Look at the frequency response measurement and also use your ears and plot out how you're going to EQ the headphone to the most neutral/accurate response. Use log sweep test tone (logarithmic, not linear), pink noise, sine wave test tones (search for Bing Audio Test Tones on the web), and a wide range of musical material that put a microscope on various frequency regions and different balance of arrangements. Don't just listen to metal or EDM or jazz or classical. Use as wide a range of styles, density in arrangement, mastering styles (highly compressed, lots of dynamic range, very natural, very artificial, very bright, very warm, etc.) as possible.

Use parametric EQ and do narrow and wide band sweeps to correct peaks and valleys in the frequency response. It takes patience and careful listening. Sometimes you might find the exact center frequency of where the problem is, and you can even dial in the right amount of correction in exact dBs, but you might not get the width of the band correct. This is when you need to listen to log sweep tone and listen for obvious dips and peaks right before and after the exact spot you're making correction to. If you get the bandwidth correct, you will be able to dial in the perfect correction that results in a very smooth log sweep.

If you don't understand how headphone measurements work and how it differs from speaker measurements, then you need to educate yourself on this. The best resource on the web is InnerFidelity: Headphone Measurements Explained | InnerFidelity

One of the most recent developments in the art and science of headphones, is the Harman Target Response Curve. It is explained in the link above. You need to understand the implications of this new development and what it means for achieving ideal target response for headphones, and how you will use it to properly EQ your headphone.

4) If you want the most natural sound from your headphones, making them sound like perfectly calibrated speakers in an ideal mastering studio, then you want to use a HRTF (Head Related Transfer Function) plugin, such as TB Isone: TB Isone

HRTF is far more advanced than your typical crossfeed: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head-r...nsfer_function

That plugin is created by one of the engineers who worked for Phillips Research, Dolby Laboratories, and worked on the MPEG-4 standard, so he's an knowledgeable and skilled developer you can trust: Jeroen Breebaart | Home

TB Isone allows you to dial in just a basic crossfeed too, if that's all you want, but it also allows you to dial in the exact studio space you want, and the exact speaker configuration you want. So considering its price, it's a far better deal than other more basic crossfeeds (yet more expensive) plugins on the market such as Redline Monitor.

If you follow all of the above, you will achieve the most ideal neutral/accurate/natural sound possible with whichever headphone you end up with, as long as the headphone you choose does not have egregious problems in the first place that's very hard to correct (such as drivers that outputs very anemic sub-bass but cannot handle being EQ'd without severe distortion).

Last edited by Lunatique; 26th November 2015 at 12:41 AM.. Reason: Additional information
Old 26th November 2015
  #2999
Deleted b598644
Guest


very neutral
Old 26th November 2015
  #3000
Lives for gear
 
Lunatique's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BassX View Post
http://www.sweetwater.com/images/items/750/K240mk2-large.jpg

very neutral
Have you seen the frequency response measurement for it? The sub-bass rolls off dramatically starting at around 130 Hz. By the time you get to 40 Hz, it's already dropped 10 dB. There's a -5 dB dip around the 6 KHz region too, but dips in that upper-mids region is quite common.
πŸ“ Reply
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
πŸ–¨οΈ Show Printable Version
βœ‰οΈ Email this Page
πŸ” Search thread
♾️ Similar Threads
πŸŽ™οΈ View mentioned gear