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Is it the end of commercial studios!! Keyboard Synthesizers
Old 10th June 2003
  #31
Gear Maniac
 
hammer's Avatar
 

Dudes! I think a few of us are missing the point here! It's about US and our skill. Skill in engineering and our skills in business. The only people who really give a **** about the studio is US. NOT the people recording. We want to use the better gear to do a better job cause we love it - that's what makes us good. But all that part is OUR call. Artists come to me cause they know I'm good and they know I'll go a good job. They couldn't give a fuk if I'm using protools/sonar or tape. If i say the song needs tape, we go somewhere that has tape. If the budget only allows digital then so be it. If i think a 3rd opinion on the mixing will be beneficial, I send it off for a mix. I'm the producer, it's my choice. that's my job - to make sure that the artist gets THE BEST possible recording for their budget. BTW I have a project studio that I do a lot of my work in, but it was a business decision, NOT a love decision to get one (Like Jules). The studio gets rented out occaisionally by my friends but that's a BONUS. People hire me. NOT the studio.
P.S Business couldn't be better.

anyway, my 2c.
I didn't mean to offend anyone out there with this, just felt that it needed to be said cause I believe it's a fairly important point that gets missed out here in gearslutville.

peace
H.
Old 10th June 2003
  #32
Lives for gear
 
Curve Dominant's Avatar
Quote:
posted by hammer:
Dudes! I think a few of us are missing the point here! It's about US and our skill. Skill in engineering and our skills in business. The only people who really give a **** about the studio is US. NOT the people recording. We want to use the better gear to do a better job cause we love it - that's what makes us good. But all that part is OUR call. Artists come to me cause they know I'm good and they know I'll go a good job. They couldn't give a fuk if I'm using protools/sonar or tape. If i say the song needs tape, we go somewhere that has tape. If the budget only allows digital then so be it. If i think a 3rd opinion on the mixing will be beneficial, I send it off for a mix. I'm the producer, it's my choice. that's my job - to make sure that the artist gets THE BEST possible recording for their budget. BTW I have a project studio that I do a lot of my work in, but it was a business decision, NOT a love decision to get one (Like Jules). The studio gets rented out occaisionally by my friends but that's a BONUS. People hire me. NOT the studio.
Amen, Good Brother.

Can y'all give the good brother a witness???
Old 10th June 2003
  #33
Lives for gear
 
Curve Dominant's Avatar
Quote:
posted by Beezoboy:
It seems to me that if a guy on a DAW was putting out quality work, he would eventually want to open up a studio anyway. Then in time he would have a "pro" studio and no longer be home enthusiest and would just be one more studio owner.
This seems to be the wave of the future.

A hiphop artist I'm currently collaborating with now calls my attention to clipping on the recording meters, and is quickly learning the PT edit window keyboard shortcuts. I think to myself, "This guy's a future partner in a studio venture."

DAW's are great for learning studio architecture in microcosm.

Enlist local talent to practice the production/engineering skills on, in exchange for CD demos. You may just very likely discover some special talent in the process. Diamonds in the rough, so to speak, who just need an ambitious aspiring producer (like you) to make them shine.

Perhaps that's the arrow pointing to the future of recording studios; more than just recording audio: Developing talent. The recording studio as a house of art.

This seems to be the wave of the future.
Old 10th June 2003
  #34
jon
Capitol Studios Paris
 
jon's Avatar
 

We're all coming at this with very different perspectives.

Here's mine. Like SM, it's been a good year for us so far. 2002 was our tough start-up year, when we jumped from small mid-level facility to buying out a major existing facility and installing a lot of new gear. A lot of risk involved, but 2003 has exceeded expectations by a long shot. The first nine months of the year have been fully booked out so far with music albums and the occasional 5.1 film music mix or orchestral session.

Leasing costly high-end gear with the expectation that it will generate profitable increased business still works in this market -- and I see no sign of that changing for the best facilities.

The critical thing is to be able to continually invest to improve the studio in terms of gear, staff, service, and comfort/look/feel/vibe.

To differ with one of the last posts...I find that studio gear DOES matter for high-end clients. Immensely even. Engineers and producers know what they want...and they don't really want anything else.

As long as there are productions with the budget to afford them, there will be commercial studios.

Yes, we do see an awful lot of poorly-recorded home DAW stuff that is sent here for mixing. It's a current reality and it doesn't sound as good as it could. There is also pro project-studio stuff that comes in sounding pretty good...and frequently those projects decide to re-do their drums or basics here before mixing. That's the A&R and artists' call, however. We just do what we can to help them reach their goals.
Old 15th June 2003
  #35
Lives for gear
 
Renie's Avatar
 

There is more competition than ever due to DAWs. Some of that will involve a reshuffle.

As BT says it's about talent at the end of the day and as SM also notes, attitude.

Much depends on the psychology of the studio owner, someone who can
learn to dance on a shifting carpet rather than someone who sees the rug being pullled from under them.
Old 15th June 2003
  #36
Lives for gear
 
Curve Dominant's Avatar
Quote:
Much depends on the psychology of the studio owner, someone who can learn to dance on a shifting carpet rather than someone who sees the rug being pullled from under them.
__________________
Renie Coffey
That's a VERY insightful way of viewing the situation.

It takes a certain psychology to stay plugged into what's happening in music on a street level.

And it takes a certain phychology to envision the recording studio as something different than what it has been historically percieved as.

As the capabilities of modern recording studios change and grow, so does the expectations of them...the Shifting Carpet.

What it comes down to is: Can you dance?
Old 15th June 2003
  #37
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

I think it really comes down to a combination of talent and motivation.

Studios and gear can be very good tools for increasing motivation because they reduce the number of excuses available. You can potentially make a fine sounding hit record on a cassette machine and a $15 mike but the question is "Are you likely to be willing to bother with that much hassle?"

This is why Mixerman defines gear as things that can make your job easier or harder. I think that is absolutely brilliant and it applies to everything and everybody involved in a recording project including recording in a commercial studio or recording by a lake.
Old 22nd June 2003
  #38
Here for the gear
 

O.K.What´s about the Record Companies.??The majors.???I see them dying day by day a liitle more. Will they survive. Who should sell the music, or better give the money to make a good production??
APPLE?? :-))
The future ???? TV Stations selling SUPERSTARS!!!
I see Artists/Musicians playing more live Gigs to bring their music to the people and earn some little money. If they have luck
they will sell some music on demand. But will this be enough to pay a good engineer or a good Vintage geared Studio;-))??

Yes a few well known will sure survive ...but all Midpriced ones should not close their eyes ......like all of us did, knowing about what was going on on napster ........Nobody cares about cheap CDR´s and all ot the other illegal internet stuff killing our jobs.
We shoud all wake up and find together a way making international protests about illegal copying and trading music.
Exuse my bad english ;-))

cheers
Old 22nd June 2003
  #39
Lives for gear
 
Ruphus's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally posted by LA-2A

We shoud all wake up and find together a way making international protests about illegal copying and trading music.


Janis Ian
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