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What was the first DDD CD to be released?
Old 15th February 2010
  #1
What was the first DDD CD to be released?

Does anyone know the first commercial disc to be produced that was digital throughout the entire production process?

I'd wager it was probably a classical disc on Sony and that it is probably long since deleted but if anyone knows or could help me locate a copy I'd be really grateful.
Old 15th February 2010
  #2
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Silvertone's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenewyear View Post
Does anyone know the first commercial disc to be produced that was entirely digitally recorded?

I'd wager it was probably a classical disc on Sony and that it is probably long since deleted but if anyone knows or could help me locate a copy I'd be really grateful.
I believe it was on Tom Jungs DMP label. DMP stands for "digital music production" and Tom was at the forefront back in the day... I can't remeber the artist but I remember it being a "big thing" in the trade magazines at the time.

Anybody know what he's up to now?
Old 15th February 2010
  #3
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Denon were recording digitally since about 1973.

Even the Sony PCM-F1 system was out in 1982 - one year ahead of CD (the first CDs were in 1983).

So I would say the first fully digital CD would have been in 1982 or 1983.

I don't know what it was, though and it would not have been labelled DDD as this designation came later, if I remember correctly.
Old 15th February 2010
  #4
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My guess would be the first Flim and the BB's (1978) album , as DMP Records' Tom Jung was (I believe) the first beta tester for the newly developed 3M digital recorder back then. I don't believe anyone else got hold of that machine 'til February/March of '79 when A&M (and others I'm sure) got one.

Might be tough getting a copy of that as it was released by Sound 80 Records (before Jung formed DMP) - now defunct. I believe it did make it to CD though before the masters were "lost to technology." -there was no analog master of the album and slight changes in the 3M system have rendered the original (digital) master unreadable by any machine other than the original prototype that recorded it (which is long gone).

You could probably still get Ry Cooder's 1979 "Bop Till You Drop" though.
Old 15th February 2010
  #5
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Denon produced the DN-023R in 1972, an 8-track recorder working at a sampling rate of 47.25kHz and a bit depth of 13 bits. The tape transport was based on a Shibaden 2-inch helical-scan VTR. Way preceding DASH, one could splice tape on these things!

Found some pics on the web --
<http://www.teddigital.com/DN023RADC.htm>

I believe there was a series of classical LPs in the mid-late '70s with Denon PCM logos -- I'm sure someone here remembers better than I do.

I must have a DMP sampler CD with a track by Flim and the BB's on it somewhere in my attic (or basement). it would be really interesting to see how the sound stacks up to today's digital recordings.
Old 15th February 2010
  #6
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A number of the Telarc records that were recorded digitally in the late 70's got made into CDs the moment those hit the market; I have a copy of their CD-80039 (Stravinsky's "The Firebird" by The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra under Robert Shaw) that was recorded in 1978 and became available on CD in '82 or '83. Recorded on a Soundstream digital tape deck. DDD.
Old 16th February 2010
  #7
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According to wiki the first digitally recorded, mixed and delivered cd was AABBAs 'The Visitors' in '82.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Visitors_(ABBA_album)

Dire Straits 'Brothers In Arms' was the first cd to sell a million in '85.
Old 16th February 2010
  #8
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Ry Cooder's "Bop Till You Drop," in 1978 utilized a 3M digital 32 track at Amigo in North Hollywood. The 3M (1 inch) ran at 45 ips and recorded at 16 bits, 50 kHz. There were no 16 bit converters commercially available, so 3M used a Burr-Brown 12-bit ADC + 4 bits of an 8 bit ADC to gain range to 16 bits. It was mixed down to 3M digital 4-track (1/2 inch) at 45 ips.

The first non-Rock/Pop digital recording was the Santa Fe Opera in 1976 using a Soundstream 1 inch 8-track digital reel-to-reel at 16 bits PCM (not sure what combination of ADC's they used to get to 16 bits), with a Honeywell transport. Look for 1976 classical releases from Telarc and RCA to hear this machine.

The 3M digital multi-track preceded the Sony PCM Umatic, Mitsubishi X-80 and Sony DASH recorders. A good example of this machine is the English Beat's "Special Beat Service," recorded at Roundhouse in 1981. Still sounds great today.
Old 16th February 2010
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cinealta View Post
Ry Cooder's "Bop Till You Drop," in 1978 utilized a 3M digital 32 track at Amigo in North Hollywood.
Yep, I thought it was this one, too. Thanks for the excellent detail!
Old 16th February 2010
  #10
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I thionk it was the Santa Fe opera in 197X. Recorded to 2 track PCM.
Old 16th February 2010
  #12
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wiki is wrong

Quote:
Originally Posted by O.F.F. View Post
According to wiki the first digitally recorded, mixed and delivered cd was AABBAs 'The Visitors' in '82.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Visitors_(ABBA_album)

Dire Straits 'Brothers In Arms' was the first cd to sell a million in '85.

There seems to be a misunderstanding on wiki, and here as well. "DDD" does not mean no analog gear was used. It means digital multitrack, digital mixdown deck, digital disc. There were not digital mixing boards in 1982 or 1985, so ABBA and Dire Straits were not PURE digital recordings.

The first PURE digital recordings on CD would have been whatever PURE digital recordings ALREADY existed before the CD, that got immediate CD releases when CDs first came out. As others have alluded to, Classical, Cooder, DMP, etc.

I can tell you Flim & The BB's still sounds great in pure, unedited, un-remixed digital. Pure invention.
Old 16th February 2010
  #13
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"The Visitors album was one of the first records to be recorded and mixed digitally, and was the first in history to be manufactured on the new CD format in 1982."

You might like to fix this wiki entry then.

Bop 'til You Drop was the first 'pop' album digitally recorded but when I bought it in the early 80s it was not available on cd.
Old 21st June 2012
  #14
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First DDD CD

The first DDD album to be released was The California Project by Papa Doo Run Run on Telarc records.
Old 21st June 2012
  #15
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I read this and thought of Diners Drive Ins and Dives.
Old 5th January 2019
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigdocd View Post
The first DDD album to be released was The California Project by Papa Doo Run Run on Telarc records.
This was released in 1985, about a year after the first DDDs.

ABBA's "The Visitor" was released in early 1983, but it was only "mostly digital."

Billy Joel's "52nd Street" actually beat ABBA to the market as the first CD released (October 13, 1982) -- but it was AAD.

So far as I can tell, the first DDD release was Peter Gabriel's "Security," released September 5, 1982 on LP and October 1984 on CD.

Lots more info here

Last edited by rcarlberg; 5th January 2019 at 08:00 AM.. Reason: Added link
Old 5th January 2019
  #17
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I think Passion, Fire & Grace - John McLaughlin, Al Di Meola and Paco de Lucía's follow-up to the Friday Night in San Fransisco album - was actually recorded and released by Phillips themselves as a demonstration DDD CD to show off their new format. I remember this CD being fairly ubiquitous in Hi-Fi shop listening rooms at the time anyway.

Last edited by James Lehmann; 6th January 2019 at 09:46 AM..
Old 5th January 2019
  #18
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Sigma's Avatar
The organization I was associated with..S.P.A.R.S created the AAD ADD and DDD delineations for CD's ..I doubt many non industry people cared but for audiophiles..but historically , it is cool to easy see noe
Old 5th January 2019
  #19
Stevie Wonder recorded "Hotter Than July" on the 3m digital multitrack in 1980. It was first released as vinyl.
Old 5th January 2019
  #20
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First digitally recorded commercial release:
Steve Marcus - Something (1971)

First digitally recorded Classical album:
Mozart: String Quartet No.17 - Smetana Quartet (1972)

First all-digital recording in Western Europe for commercial release:
Bach: Musical Offering - Paillard Chamber Orchestra

First all-digital recording in the U.S. for commerical release:
Archie Shepp - On Green Dolphin Street (1978)

In terms of a major label digital multi-track commercial "Pop" recording, many claim Ry Cooder 's Bop Till You Drop (1979)

Supposedly, the first "commercial" CD produced by Polydor's pressing plant in Germany was The Visitors by ABBA (1981).


First Digital Recording?
Old 6th January 2019
  #21
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This thread is old and still kicking. I don't personally know the answer although I was paying a small degree of attention to the topic as cds were coming in. It didn't seem very important to me at the time, but I'd always look at the cd labels and pick up info from whereever I could there at the waning days of R-E-P etc.

I don't think Bop is it as that gets disputed on audiophile forum discussions.

There's also the issue of some folks considering ddd to include digital mixing consoles. While Telarc and Soundstream and those guys were first with digital capture, I think a lot of that stuff went direct to disk etc without a "mix" step in the process through a dedicated console...much less digital console.

A lot of guys grabbing the first 3m 32 digital machines after the 1977 aes in NY were connected to analog consoles at mix and then on to analog 2trk. The console seems to be the hang point in many ddd discussions.

I don't think Abba had a digital console for "The Visitor" but maybe they did. I don't quite have the knowledge of what/when/where the digital Neve etc was placed.

There's some discussion that Paul Davis had an entire digital rig, including console.... purchased sometime just before he bought one of the first linndrums as well. Supposidly "65 Love Affair" and "Cool Nights" are entirely ddd including console. If so.... they sure sound like it, esp Cool Nights. And I mean that in a bad way. Although I like the tunes. You put those up against his earlier aaa "I Go Crazy" and you hear the flatness in his digital recordings.

I was on F1 systems (specifically the Technics version) by early 1981 and that was as far as I was going to go with digital at that point because of the cost. I had no clue that we'd all be cringing at a lot of the early digital sonics in later years.

I seem to remember cds appearing just about the same time...maybe a few months earlier or a few months later.
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