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China Mic Trip Pictures and Thoughts Condenser Microphones
Old 19th December 2009
  #421
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Joly View Post
OK, I'll take stab at answering my own question: "How do we as intellectual property creators (whether music, software, images or physical products) enhance the brand experience so much that low cost knock offs will only appeal to the lowest-price bottom dwellers while the high-value customers we really want to do business with will want to have an authentic brand experience"?

By providing a superior customer experience - personal service, a "consultive selling process", excellent quality audio demonstrations, a network of users who can share information about their experiences and product usage, well-written and complete technical documentation (individual frequency response curves - not just 'averaged' curves), a life time warrantee and a "study-ready" story that impresses clients. What have I left out?
This sounds a lot like the concept of "rich content" referring to media.
Creating a source so rich in content that there's a demand for the original instead of a pirated copy.

We haven't been able to do it yet with music. Maybe you can do it with mics.

Here are some thoughts from a recent thread at 3dB, which was about video games.

Quote:
George Massenburg called it "rich content" in an interview I did with him years ago. Offering customers something so rich in detail that they want the original and not a pirated or compromised version. I'm reminded of Quadrophenia by The Who which I bought when it first came out. Double album with a 16 page 12 x 12" booklet inside.
Source: 3dB - View Single Post - "Call of Duty / " sells 4.7 million units on 1st day

Michael, I applaud your goals and intentions. I'll watch eagerly to see how it turns out.
Old 19th December 2009
  #422
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Thank Lynn. The "rich content" goal really goes beyond me - its a challenge all of us are facing - studio owners included. Studio owners actually have a bit of immunity from "Chinese product dumping" - the vibe created by local studios and their staffs is under control of the proprietors. I suppose "product dumping" shows up in Behringer / PT lite studio competition - but studio vibe can't be cloned or replaced by bottom-feeder products.
Old 19th December 2009
  #423
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Michael, I admire your optimistic outlook. I think it's great to expect good things from people, on many different levels.

Having said that, the one thing I think your lawyer has wrong is this: There's hardly any respect for IP in the U.S., either. There is a strong legal tradition behind it, but within American culture you'll find basically no respect for it at all. Whether the product is music or software or the written, the average American's attitude is, "If you've already made it, why are you charging for it, and why should I pay for it?"

I think the "rich media" concept essentially has no meaning in the real world. All valuable content is digital at this point, and all digital content can be copied perfectly.

JSL
Old 19th December 2009
  #424
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Joly View Post
I suppose "product dumping" shows up in Behringer / PT lite studio competition - but studio vibe can't be cloned or replaced by bottom-feeder products.
M -

I'd have to disagree. That's EXACTLY what has happened to the studio market with the influx of people who don't know what a real studio offers.

A real U47 or C12 can't be cloned properly (at least so far) by the low end manufacturers, but that hasn't stopped their low end mics from flooding the market, wreaking havoc on the microphone "food chain". They invade, wearing the moniker of "12" or "47" or "251", laughably, with model numbers that are marketed to make those who have never experienced the real deal think they are getting "close". Often the marketeers are so bold as to lead us to believe that the product is in fact better than the original. heh heh (I'll refrain from naming names.....) It was only a few years ago that the general consensus was that you needed to spend $2000-3000+ to get a decent mic. Now, people are complaining about mics in the $1K range, not wanting to spend over $5-600 for what would have been a sonically comparable product. (Even though, at least build and quality wise, they are not comparable.) The problem is that most buyers in that range have never heard the real thing, and are so compelled to "have to have" a U47, C12, fill in the blank, that they buy marketing hook line and sinker.

In a scary parallel for us in the studio business, low end studios flooding the market have pretty much rendered all but a precious few top end studios to the extinction zone - leaving the "studio time for sale" market completely decimated. I don't know a single musician that doesn't have SOME type of studio. And almost all of them think they have the chops, vision and objectivity to pull off their projects in house, at home with no help from outside engineers or studios. And of course, those of us who have pursued audio / music for decades know that's not really possible on an industry wide large scale. Bottom line - one has to have something other than "time at my faciility" to sell. In my case, that is decades of experience, awards, quality output, and a compelling SERVICE (aka SERVANT) attitude.

Your "rich content" vision is the correct focus for a product / service in this industry. Those without that type of vision - or without something unique and compelling - will suffer or die of attrition.

It's a brave new world......
Old 19th December 2009
  #425
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Oops, guess I hit a hot button there Dr. Bill If Lynn is still around I'd like to hear his thoughts too.

I see your point - you're suggesting "real studio vibe and results" can't be cloned, but there is a growing base of musicians who believe low-cost imitations operated by newly minted "recording engineers" are close enough. So the problem is not the existence of low-cost solutions per se, but the belief that these tools in somewhat inexperienced hands can deliver professional results consistently.

re: "Rich Media" / superior value added service: here's where I'm at with this idea -
I'm convinced of the validity of the concept, but I'm pondering how to do the "reduction to practice". That is, how to take the rich media concept and practice it personally. To drill down beneath the surface generalities and hit the wellspring of specific actionable ideas.

As your post suggests, the answer is to somehow take years of your own professional service and the results you've gotten and make them immediately tangible to the buyer. I guess there will be as many answers to this challenge as there are practitioners.

Hmm...at the risk of breaking my own rule to strive for specifics (and because I never get too far away from the metaphysics of this ****)...perhaps the answer comes down to the embodiment and communication of Personality. In other words, our value lies in the recognition and expression of Personality - our spirit, our soul, the divine-origin part of us that no low cost product has (despite my belief a microphone can be a brother, it does not have a death surviving Personality component - but this is OT as we like to say).
Old 19th December 2009
  #426
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
This sounds a lot like the concept of "rich content" referring to media.
Creating a source so rich in content that there's a demand for the original instead of a pirated copy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Joly View Post
Thank Lynn. The "rich content" goal really goes beyond me - its a challenge all of us are facing...
Quote:
Originally Posted by jslevin View Post
I think the "rich media" concept essentially has no meaning in the real world. All valuable content is digital at this point, and all digital content can be copied perfectly.
I have only one example that I can point to in supporting my theory. It's the comparison CDs I sell. (The 3D CDs compare preamps, converters, mics, ProTools vs. Neve mixing, etc. Not a plug for them, just in case some don't know.) Granted, they aren't for the "great unwashed" and have no appeal to the public at large. But people want to hear the highest resolution possible instead of MP3s. I'm not naive enough to think that the files aren't available for free download as MP3s somewhere on the web. Yet people continue to buy the originals.

I hear people speak longingly about LP jackets with artwork large enough to see and fonts large enough to read without a magnifying glass. I don't think it can all be chalked up to nostalgia. I think those were things that represented true value.

"Pride of ownership" is one thing I talk about a lot. Are people proud to own a music CD or collection these days. Do they want the original? Does it offer any value to them? In thirty years I suspect people may hold that CD they bought back in the 90s with a little more care and respect than the 4M digital file that they downloaded.

I'm just not sure that people will pay for it though. Time will tell.

Gibson's still making guitars in spite of all the Korean clones. That's a good sign.
Old 19th December 2009
  #427
Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
It was only a few years ago that the general consensus was that you needed to spend $2000-3000+ to get a decent mic. Now, people are complaining about mics in the $1K range, not wanting to spend over $5-600 for what would have been a sonically comparable product.
$500-600? That was three years ago. In another thread here yesterday people are debating between a $189 vocal mic and $169 vocal mic.
Old 19th December 2009
  #428
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Michael_Joly's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
I have only one example that I can point to in supporting my theory. It's the comparison CDs I sell. (The 3D CDs compare preamps, converters, mics, ProTools vs. Neve mixing, etc. Not a plug for them, just in case some don't know.) Granted, they aren't for the "great unwashed" and have no appeal to the public at large. But people want to hear the highest resolution possible instead of MP3s. I'm not naive enough to think that the files aren't available for free download as MP3s somewhere on the web. Yet people continue to buy the originals...
Thanks for the specific examples Lynn! You answered my (perhaps not-so-subtle) call for folks to provide specific examples rather than generalizations. Specifics are so helpful in addressing this challenge we all face because, well...from a specific example one can extropolate an answer that might be applicable in other situations.

I see another value you offer in your CDs beyond file resolution - ease of use!

So my take-aways from your example is "highest quality" and "ease of use". Now its up to me to embody in my work, those specific concepts that work for you in yours.
Old 19th December 2009
  #429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Joly View Post
Oops, guess I hit a hot button there Dr. Bill If Lynn is still around I'd like to hear his thoughts too.

I see your point - you're suggesting "real studio vibe and results" can't be cloned, but there is a growing base of musicians who believe low-cost imitations operated by newly minted "recording engineers" are close enough. So the problem is not the existence of low-cost solutions per se, but the belief that these tools in somewhat inexperienced hands can deliver professional results consistently.
Again, I think that concept, "the belief that these tools in somewhat inexperienced hands can deliver professional results consistently" was popular years ago but is less prevalent now.

Now the more predominant realizations I see are

A) Musicians and producers have home studios where they are forced to work due to budget restraints, not by choice

B) They realize their limitations but are in a situation where they don't have the option because of shrinking budgets.

I know lots of musicians and producers who used to track in live rooms and use engineers for tracking and overdubs and would hire a studio/engineer to mix that are now doing everything at home. One musician friend turned producer turned engineer gets $250 a song to convert a musical score into a finished production. FACT: You can't hire a studio or musicians or engineers when you have a budget like that unless you're willing to work for free. He does everything himself, hiring a guitar player and a singer per song. Does he tout himself as a mixer? No. He mixes out of necessity.

With more and more of the musicians I know, it's less about "I can do it at home" these days and more about "I can't afford NOT to do it at home." The disturbing reality here (Nashville) is that clients pay the same musician scale whether the musician is sitting at home doing overdubs or in the studio--the difference being the savings with no engineer and studio when they do it at home.

The truth is that lots of the guys (first call musicians) that I work with aren't slouches. They've had the advantage of working with Class A engineers for years and they've picked up a few things. And gotten answers to valuable questions along the way during sessions. And they have good ears. I was just paid by a local first call saxophonist to go into the studio and we auditioned 19 mics and 7 preamps on tenor and bari sax and flute. He ended up buying his two favorite mics and two favorite preamps. About $5100 worth. His goal was to record sounds as good as what he could get in a studio. But I can tell you for a fact that he doesn't enjoy wearing the producer's, engineer's and player's hats all at the same time.

His reason? The budgets for the gigs that he used to get called for doing overdubs on assorted projects (usually mail-in or now ftp-in work) had shrunken to the point where he couldn't afford to rent a studio. Does he WANT to sit in his converted garage and do solos and parts? No. Does he want to be able to continue making a living playing horns? Yes. This was a matter of survival for him.

That's the economic reality here at the dawn of the 21st century as I see it from my little corner of the world.

Sorry if that's a sidetrack but it's related to this issue or at least that post.

So, I think quality is still appreciated and valued. I'm just not sure there are as many people that can afford it.
Old 19th December 2009
  #430
You already bring several things to the table that most Chinese importers can not. Reputation. Trust. History.

Are those things still worth something in dollars and cents. In my experience, yes.

I have more to say but it will get into specifics that can't be posted publicly. MJ, email me if you wish to have that conversation. 3daudio(at)charter.net.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Joly View Post
As your post suggests, the answer is to somehow take years of your own professional service and the results you've gotten and make them immediately tangible to the buyer. I guess there will be as many answers to this challenge as there are practitioners.

Hmm...at the risk of breaking my own rule to strive for specifics (and because I never get too far away from the metaphysics of this ****)...perhaps the answer comes down to the embodiment and communication of Personality. In other words, our value lies in the recognition and expression of Personality - our spirit, our soul, the divine-origin part of us that no low cost product has (despite my belief a microphone can be a brother, it does not have a death surviving Personality component - but this is OT as we like to say).
Old 19th December 2009
  #431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Joly View Post
I see another value you offer in your CDs beyond file resolution - ease of use!
Well if you want to go there (ease of use) then come up with a tube mic with two connectors on it. An XLR output and an IEC power cable input. All the second engineers in the world would kiss you on the lips.
Old 19th December 2009
  #432
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beechstudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
Again, I think that concept, "the belief that these tools in somewhat inexperienced hands can deliver professional results consistently" was popular years ago but is less prevalent now.

Now the more predominant realizations I see are

A) Musicians and producers have home studios where they are forced to work due to budget restraints, not by choice

B) They realize their limitations but are in a situation where they don't have the option because of shrinking budgets.

I know lots of musicians and producers who used to track in live rooms and use engineers for tracking and overdubs and would hire a studio/engineer to mix that are now doing everything at home. One musician friend turned producer turned engineer gets $250 a song to convert a musical score into a finished production. FACT: You can't hire a studio or musicians or engineers when you have a budget like that unless you're willing to work for free. He does everything himself, hiring a guitar player and a singer per song. Does he tout himself as a mixer? No. He mixes out of necessity.

With more and more of the musicians I know, it's less about "I can do it at home" these days and more about "I can't afford NOT to do it at home." The disturbing reality here (Nashville) is that clients pay the same musician scale whether the musician is sitting at home doing overdubs or in the studio--the difference being the savings with no engineer and studio when they do it at home.

The truth is that lots of the guys (first call musicians) that I work with aren't slouches. They've had the advantage of working with Class A engineers for years and they've picked up a few things. And gotten answers to valuable questions along the way during sessions. And they have good ears. I was just paid by a local first call saxophonist to go into the studio and we auditioned 19 mics and 7 preamps on tenor and bari sax and flute. He ended up buying his two favorite mics and two favorite preamps. About $5100 worth. His goal was to record sounds as good as what he could get in a studio. But I can tell you for a fact that he doesn't enjoy wearing the producer's, engineer's and player's hats all at the same time.

His reason? The budgets for the gigs that he used to get called for doing overdubs on assorted projects (usually mail-in or now ftp-in work) had shrunken to the point where he couldn't afford to rent a studio. Does he WANT to sit in his converted garage and do solos and parts? No. Does he want to be able to continue making a living playing horns? Yes. This was a matter of survival for him.

That's the economic reality here at the dawn of the 21st century as I see it from my little corner of the world.

Sorry if that's a sidetrack but it's related to this issue or at least that post.

So, I think quality is still appreciated and valued. I'm just not sure there are as many people that can afford it.
Hey Lynn.......any chance you could tell us what 2 mics and preamps he ended up with?
Old 19th December 2009
  #433
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memphisindie's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Joly View Post
OK, I'll take stab at answering my own question: "How do we as intellectual property creators (whether music, software, images or physical products) enhance the brand experience so much that low cost knock offs will only appeal to the lowest-price bottom dwellers while the high-value customers we really want to do business with will want to have an authentic brand experience"?
By providing a superior customer experience - personal service, a "consultive selling process", excellent quality audio demonstrations, a network of users who can share information about their experiences and product usage, well-written and complete technical documentation (individual frequency response curves - not just 'averaged' curves), a life time warrantee and a "studio-ready" story that impresses clients. What have I left out?
Yeah, Mike!

The laundry list above you already provide, every interface with the customer is a "golden opportunity" to bring them further into the culture of your business. Right now you manage it with great ability, and underneath what yo do that is there, but, once it is given a term, a language, it becomes a very duplicatable, understandable thing that you can train into staff. Then you will no longer need a list because it will be obvious in every interaction "what is called for", seeing through that paradigm.
What you're describing is called a "culture" of customers that intertwines with your business, you are one unit. The become part of your culture. That is sound practice. More on that below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
This sounds a lot like the concept of "rich content" referring to media.
Creating a source so rich in content that there's a demand for the original instead of a pirated copy.
We haven't been able to do it yet with music. Maybe you can do it with mics.
Michael, I applaud your goals and intentions. I'll watch eagerly to see how it turns out.
There was a run in the industry of what was called "Rich Content CD's" before the great decline became obvious. They were CD's with content veiwable on computer pics, webpage, lnks, movies, interviews.
It was abandoned early on. Maybe a comeback? Still, even with the interviews, a bit disingenuous, and bloody impersonal way to bring people into the culture of "that band". It could still have value.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Joly View Post
Thank Lynn. The "rich content" goal really goes beyond me - its a challenge all of us are facing - studio owners included. Studio owners actually have a bit of immunity from "Chinese product dumping" - the vibe created by local studios and their staffs is under control of the proprietors. I suppose "product dumping" shows up in Behringer / PT lite studio competition - but studio vibe can't be cloned or replaced by bottom-feeder products.
Rich content can not save studios, if you don't already have that going on you don't have much of a studio, because, studios had to have rich content from day one. Still, studios are also the victims of chinese dumping, big time. but, piracy is a MUCH bigger problem industry-wide.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jslevin View Post
Michael, I admire your optimistic outlook. I think it's great to expect good things from people, on many different levels.
Having said that, the one thing I think your lawyer has wrong is this: There's hardly any respect for IP in the U.S., either. There is a strong legal tradition behind it, but within American culture you'll find basically no respect for it at all. Whether the product is music or software or the written, the average American's attitude is, "If you've already made it, why are you charging for it, and why should I pay for it?"
I think the "rich media" concept essentially has no meaning in the real world. All valuable content is digital at this point, and all digital content can be copied perfectly.
JSL
Rich Content has no meaning if you aren't actually very clear on what it means, to you and the customer, and how to provide it, which labels didn't.
The last round of "rich content CD's, could only be watched well on the computers that created them, above the reach of most customers. For them the experience was crap. NOW most people have a computer capable of appreciating it.
Content hasn't been provided in a manner that is can be respected, it's TOO easy to pirate, it needs to have a respectable obstacle to that. Make it impossible for it to be copied by the everyday guy, and make it easy to be copied at a low quality by hackers only and you have a start. Fool them into thinking they have it copied and have it be a wrecked lo-res copy. Let them destroy their own reputation.
The pirates have developed their culture, THEY will have to destroy it. WE, as providers, can help them out by giving CD's a rich content again that is designed to suck and implode on pirates.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Joly View Post
Oops, guess I hit a hot button there Dr. Bill If Lynn is still around I'd like to hear his thoughts too.

I see your point - you're suggesting "real studio vibe and results" can't be cloned, but there is a growing base of musicians who believe low-cost imitations operated by newly minted "recording engineers" are close enough. So the problem is not the existence of low-cost solutions per se, but the belief that these tools in somewhat inexperienced hands can deliver professional results consistently.
Get them into a studio with a real engineer and they'll be forever changed. When "the kids" come to record with me, even in my smallish home set-up, they leave with a respect for knowledge of the craft, usually begging to be my intern. They become part of the culture of quality. The won't be returning to the culture of "making excuses for low quality and giving it a name which makes it sound like they did it on purpose".
Quote:
re: "Rich Media" / superior value added service: here's where I'm at with this idea -
I'm convinced of the validity of the concept, but I'm pondering how to do the "reduction to practice". That is, how to take the rich media concept and practice it personally. To drill down beneath the surface generalities and hit the wellspring of specific actionable ideas.
Aah, mining the board for ideas, smartypants.
Quote:
As your post suggests, the answer is to somehow take years of your own professional service and the results you've gotten and make them immediately tangible to the buyer. I guess there will be as many answers to this challenge as there are practitioners.

Hmm...at the risk of breaking my own rule to strive for specifics (and because I never get too far away from the metaphysics of this ****)...perhaps the answer comes down to the embodiment and communication of Personality. In other words, our value lies in the recognition and expression of Personality - our spirit, our soul, the divine-origin part of us that no low cost product has (despite my belief a microphone can be a brother, it does not have a death surviving Personality component - but this is OT as we like to say).
Although that is an interesting take on it. It's the culture. What does the culture you create provide for the participants in it? More than promised? Quality? Service so complete that it's felt to the core of their being, and the face of the customer visibly shifts, so much that it is an acknowledgement to you and themselves that they have received superior service?
ALL of that and more, the details will tell you what they need to be with each customer if you are "truly listening to the customer as an individual, bringing them into your culture."
It's an overarching goal and a paradigm, a filter that everything you see, hear, touch, and say must pass. It becomes your new "that's how life is". In a "why wouldn't you do it this way?", sort of all-pervading ethos.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
I have only one example that I can point to in supporting my theory. It's the comparison CDs I sell. Yet people continue to buy the originals.

I hear people speak longingly about LP jackets with artwork large enough to see and fonts large enough to read without a magnifying glass. I don't think it can all be chalked up to nostalgia. I think those were things that represented true value.
"Pride of ownership" is one thing I talk about a lot. Are people proud to own a music CD or collection these days. Do they want the original? Does it offer any value to them?
I'm just not sure that people will pay for it though. Time will tell.
Gibson's still making guitars in spite of all the Korean clones. That's a good sign.
Back in the Album days it was new and the customers created their own "culture of listeners" to like products, i.e. King Crimson listeners, POP listeners etc..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
You already bring several things to the table that most Chinese importers can not. Reputation. Trust. History.
Are those things still worth something in dollars and cents. In my experience, yes.
I have more to say but it will get into specifics that can't be posted publicly. MJ, email me if you wish to have that conversation. 3daudio(at)charter.net.
I think that this is important. It's not the period on the sentence though.

Apple Computer has been dominated by IBM and it's tentacles for decades, Apple provides a superior service, but, IBM et.al. provide market domination and total saturation based on price. The windows system is a knockoff of the mac system, settled that in court. The buyers of IBM type products developed their own cultures, which is why they are still around, they aren't controlled by the company.
IBM and Windows had a bait based, pandering, race to the bottom structure, the rest was luck. It is not designed to last, everything they do is in reaction to their puny competitor, Apple, and a knockoff of their system.
Why?
Apple on the other hand, has developed it's own internal culture and an external culture that draws users into their company.
Is their content rich?
I'd say with the design of their products cosmetically, yes, their system software, yes, their programs abilities and ease of preference setting yes. But hat wasn't enough to dominate the home PC market.
Their customer service is legendary for sucking hard, that is the last leg of the table that make it stand, that is the incomplete section of their culture. If they get that handled they will overtake Bill Gates creation.
Do you see any chinese clones of any model Macintosh computer on the global market, any knockoffs at all?
No you don't.

They make Mac's in CHINA.
Can you have a product made in in China with NO KNOCKOFFS? It CAN be done.

If you are looking for a specific laundry list, you need to contact Steve Jobs, and you'll either get nothing, or you'll get the same thing you just read, "It's about the Culture you develop and who you develop it with", your "Grateful Dead experience", without the drawbacks. The first steps to developing your culture intertwined with that of your manufacturers culture is that nebulous post of quotes I posted earlier. You will also get a contact and a phone number for the company that taught all this to him, which I also possess.

Are you willing to address that part of the equation? That is the part that is the backbone of the equation and if you don't have a matrix, you can not stand. The money is a byproduct of the matrix, the mics are a product of the matrix. It's a paradox that requires a leap of faith. Between the gates.
YOU CAN do this.
ANYTHING IS possible.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
Well if you want to go there (ease of use) then come up with a tube mic with two connectors on it. An XLR output and an IEC power cable input. All the second engineers in the world would kiss you on the lips.
I'm not so sure about the lips. Settle for a big hug?
Old 19th December 2009
  #434
Quote:
Originally Posted by beechstudio View Post
Hey Lynn.......any chance you could tell us what 2 mics and preamps he ended up with?
I can do better than that. You can hear them yourself. I'm putting them all together in a downloadable package. It will be cheap to download and listen to them all.

He preferred and bought the AT 4050 and Advanced Audio CM-47. The 4050 caught his ear initially because of the clear upper midrange, but he has since come around to preferring the CM-47 which was my preference due to the tone and very robust low mids. And the preamps he chose were the AEA RPQ and the Great River NV.

Those who know me know that I usually don't like to do this (reveal preferences in writing) since I prefer people listen for themselves and decide. So Merry Christmas.
Old 19th December 2009
  #435
Quote:
Originally Posted by memphisindie View Post
There was a run in the industry of what was called "Rich Content CD's" before the great decline became obvious. They were CD's with content veiwable on computer pics, webpage, lnks, movies, interviews.
It was abandoned early on. Maybe a comeback? Still, even with the interviews, a bit disingenuous, and bloody impersonal way to bring people into the culture of "that band".
It wasn't abandoned. It didn't stop. My daughter still buys CDs and will watch all that stuff on the CDs. Web links and all. I bought a CD last week that had a live performance DVD bundled with it for the same price.
Old 19th December 2009
  #436
Lives for gear
 
beechstudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
I can do better than that. You can hear them yourself. I'm putting them all together in a downloadable package. It will be cheap to download and listen to them all.

He preferred and bought the AT 4050 and Advanced Audio CM-47. The 4050 caught his ear initially because of the clear upper midrange, but he has since come around to preferring the CM-47 which was my preference due to the tone and very robust low mids. And the preamps he chose were the AEA RPQ and the Great River NV.

Those who know me know that I usually don't like to do this (reveal preferences in writing) since I prefer people listen for themselves and decide. So Merry Christmas.
Thanks.......and Merry Christmas to you too! (Hey we need some Christmas smilies on here!)
Old 19th December 2009
  #437
Quote:
Originally Posted by beechstudio View Post
Thanks.......and Merry Christmas to you too! (Hey we need some Christmas smilies on here!)


Source: Christmas Smilies Icons
Old 19th December 2009
  #438
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Joly View Post
Oops, guess I hit a hot button there Dr. Bill
If by hot button you mean passionate, then yes. All I can think is that perhaps you are perhaps insulated from my world just a tiny bit. The similarities are striking. Too many things to type in a short session, too many songs to mix this weekend, not enough time in a day it seems, gotta go...... thumbsupheh Carry on.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
$500-600? That was three years ago. In another thread here yesterday people are debating between a $189 vocal mic and $169 vocal mic.
heh heh...... Yeah, I know. I was trying to be generous. heh heh
Old 19th December 2009
  #439
Lives for gear
 
memphisindie's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
It wasn't abandoned. It didn't stop. My daughter still buys CDs and will watch all that stuff on the CDs. Web links and all. I bought a CD last week that had a live performance DVD bundled with it for the same price.
Well, you've hit a niche market right here. What CD's?
I have a daughter, viola player, she's a music fan, teaching herself drums, sons picked up GTR & violin. I could have taught them but, it seemed more valuable to teach them how to teach themselves.

She would like to experience rich content CD's, who's making them?
Old 19th December 2009
  #440
Gear Maniac
 
drp audio's Avatar
 

For me a signature greatly reinforces everything we're talking about here. "Signature Editions" or "Signature Series" or even a "Signature Brand" ....

For maximum customer confidence sign each document in person, use blue ink to dispel skeptics. Incorporate a signature in all documents and related materials. Use very nice paper and create very "high end and official looking" documentation. Good paper is cheap and you could even print relatively HQ work off of a good laser printer. Ink jets smudge, that's bad news. Full color sheets can also be offset printed for an affordable rate these days and the most professional look. Maybe even a real cool pocket folder that contains related documents. Maybe a smaller pocket folder for documents with a cool sticker on the front that fits into a microphone case?

IMO this is one simple thing that increases the experience of high quality and adds a priceless value that is hard to copy and to put a dollar amount on.

Attachment 149198
Old 19th December 2009
  #441
Lives for gear
 
Michael_Joly's Avatar
 

hey drp - add "documentation designer" to your list of hats you can wear ; )
Old 19th December 2009
  #442
Gear Maniac
 
drp audio's Avatar
 

I was trying to be neutral about it ...

But I am excited to help out any way that I can!
Old 19th December 2009
  #443
Quote:
Originally Posted by drp audio View Post
Maybe even a real cool pocket folder that contains related documents. Maybe a smaller pocket folder for documents with a cool sticker on the front that fits into a microphone case?
Maybe a signature series pocket protector? For all us engineering types.
Old 19th December 2009
  #444
Lives for gear
 
tapehiss's Avatar
if you really want to see sales rise, you should put a free icecream coupon in the mic package....

this would show the consumer that you care and also give them a nice treat.
Old 19th December 2009
  #445
Lives for gear
 
Old Goat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tapehiss View Post
if you really want to see sales rise, you should put a free icecream coupon in the mic package....

this would show the consumer that you care and also give them a nice treat.
Yep. I got coffee in the package I got from Warhead last week. Guess who I'm checking with first next time i need gear?
Old 20th December 2009
  #446
Lives for gear
 
Michael_Joly's Avatar
 

How about a gift card to a local "slow food" purveyor in the mic recipient's own area?
Old 20th December 2009
  #447
Gear Addict
 
Sinocelt's Avatar
 

With warm microphones only

Quote:
Originally Posted by tapehiss View Post
if you really want to see sales rise, you should put a free icecream coupon in the mic package....
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Goat View Post
Yep. I got coffee in the package I got from Warhead last week. Guess who I'm checking with first next time i need gear?
As long as he doesn't try to implement both ideas by shipping a box of coffee ice cream with each microphone... tutt
Old 20th December 2009
  #448
Gear Addict
 
Sinocelt's Avatar
 



It looks very classy, drp audio.

My own idea was to use a "wax seal" logo, but it was before I saw your "blazon" logo. Maybe I should have finished reading the thread before I opened Photoshop.

Old 20th December 2009
  #449
Lives for gear
 
The MPCist's Avatar
 

This is very nice and original -- never saw a mic or audio equipment with this kind of mark. Great job!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinocelt View Post
Old 20th December 2009
  #450
Gear Maniac
 
low_z's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by memphisindie View Post
Do you see any chinese clones of any model Macintosh computer on the global market, any knockoffs at all?
No you don't.

They make Mac's in CHINA.
Can you have a product made in in China with NO KNOCKOFFS? It CAN be done.
Not exactly a computer but... Chinese Ipod Just sayin' Hey it's Mozart too!!
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