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Does anyone out there know a luthier that can do this???
Old 16th November 2009
  #1
Lives for gear
 

Does anyone out there know a luthier that can do this???

I need a new neck for one of my Strats... it's a very particular kind of neck, and I have not yet been able to find one like it. I did check with Warmoth, who has a lot of custom neck configuration options, and they said that they couldn't do this particular one. What's happening is that it's "going south", if you know what I mean (i.e.: heading in the direction where truss-rod adjustments no longer make a difference), and I've had it in a neck press/heat press once already, I can try that again, but I would also like to see if I can get an identical replacement neck for it, just in case...

Here are the specs:
a.) Standard Strat scale length (25.5"). That's the easy part.
b.) Wood is as follows: Maple, very slightly birdseye'd, with a Macassar Ebony fretboard. The Macassar, in this case, is not too havily striped... it's mainly about the tone & feel that is the reason I want the same type of Maple & Ebony for.
c.) Drilled for Schallers, as shown on the pic.
d.) Width at the nut is 1 & 1/4"
e.) Radius is 7.5", not a compound radius, just 7.5" straight-up all the way.
f.) Back is a '57-feel/fairly severe V-shape. It's not enhanced, but you can definitely feel the "V", if you guitar guys know what I'm saying.
g.) It has to have a clear Watco (NOT Tung) oil finish on the Maple part. I can do this part if the luthier is not inclined to do it.
h.) It's got a weird-type of scalloping on the fretboard... it's a somewhat little-known thing called: "half-moon scalloping". You can see this a little bit in the first pic I posted, and also perhaps a little bit better in the 2nd pic... I can do this part myself if the luthier cannot or doesn't want to do so, but it would be great if I could get the neck done this way from the get-go. This type of scalloping involves the afore-described half-moon shape going from the first fret all the way up to the 15th fret on the high-string side, and it runs from the high-E down to the "G" string in a half-moon/crescent shape. It also involves scalloping the low side in a similar - but more subtle - fashion, all the way up to the 12th fret, but in each instance, you're going to scallop each fret slightly less than the previous one... so that by the time you get to the 12th fret, you're going to have a gap in scalloping between the high side & the low side... make sense?

I'd be happy to ship the builder either the neck itself - or the entire guitar, if they needed it... if anyone can do this for me; or if anyone who knows anyone who can do so notices this thread & wants to contact me about it, I'd certainly appreciate you getting back to me. THANKS!
Attached Thumbnails
Does anyone out there know a luthier that can do this???-blackmore-strat1.jpg   Does anyone out there know a luthier that can do this???-blackmore-strat-neck1.jpg  
Old 16th November 2009
  #2
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
If it's that important to you, see if Phil Kubicki has time for it. His were the best non-Fender Strat necks I've played. I don't know if he's doing anything other than basses anymore.
Old 16th November 2009
  #3
Lives for gear
 
travisbrown's Avatar
Contact some of the guys on MIMF.com. Don't solicit directly on the forum, but lots of guys have links to their websites in their profiles. There are a few there who would have no problem building what you are asking for.

If you PM me, I can recommend some directly based on location, etc.
Old 16th November 2009
  #4
Lives for gear
 
travisbrown's Avatar
From the description of your neck "going south", sometimes this can be repaired by popping the fretboard off, straightening the neck, then regluing the fretboard.

Routing a channel and inserting carbon fibre rods under the fretboard can also help.

Doesn't always work. Mostly only a remedy for curvature from glue creep between the neck and fretboard. I only offer it as a possible solution to think about rather than making whole new neck.

If you are doing this, I'd suggest Eiichi Ishikawa, guitar repairman to the stars! (and also to me). Or Amy Hopkins through Stringed Instrument Repair

I had a Gibson F4 mandolin (no trussrods back in 1908) that this happened to. Became unplayable. Been fine for 15 years now since regluing the fretboard.
Old 16th November 2009
  #5
Lives for gear
 

In any event, that sounds like a more expensive proposition than a new neck - assuming I can find someone to build one - and in this case, I doubt it would even be possible/do-able from a practical standpoint... the fretboard on this guitar has a rounded seat, not a flat one. I doubt anyone would want to strip the fretboard off this beast & attempt to re-seat a new one.



Quote:
Originally Posted by travisbrown View Post
From the description of your neck "going south", sometimes this can be repaired by popping the fretboard off, straightening the neck, then regluing the fretboard.

Routing a channel and inserting carbon fibre rods under the fretboard can also help.

Doesn't always work. Mostly only a remedy for curvature from glue creep between the neck and fretboard. I only offer it as a possible solution to think about rather than making whole new neck.

If you are doing this, I'd suggest Eiichi Ishikawa, guitar repairman to the stars! (and also to me). Or Amy Hopkins through Stringed Instrument Repair

I had a Gibson F4 mandolin (no trussrods back in 1908) that this happened to. Became unplayable. Been fine for 15 years now since regluing the fretboard.
Old 16th November 2009
  #6
Lives for gear
 

One-time thread bump... if anyone sees this who knows of someone who can build a neck to these specs, please PM me. I'll give it a couple days & then I'll try the heat-press route on the current neck.

Thank you!
Old 16th November 2009
  #7
Lives for gear
 
travisbrown's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertDawg View Post
In any event, that sounds like a more expensive proposition than a new neck - assuming I can find someone to build one - and in this case, I doubt it would even be possible/do-able from a practical standpoint... the fretboard on this guitar has a rounded seat, not a flat one. I doubt anyone would want to strip the fretboard off this beast & attempt to re-seat a new one.
Usually popping the fretboard isn't a big deal. I've done on a couple of acoustics and basses and I only sort of know what i'm doing. As long as someone wasn't stupid and use epoxy to glue the fretboard down, it's usually as simple as using a silicone heat blanket to heat the fretboard and popping off with a spatula, or dropping a steam needle through one of the fret slots and injecting steam into the truss cavity.

But a cove fit between the fretboard and the neck? Wow. I can't imagine why one would do that. In that case, yes, probably much more difficult. Aesthetically kind of cool though. Now I know why it's not a compound or conically radiused neck.

Eiichi Ishikawa could build it like I mentioned above. Like Randall mentions with Petillo, not cheap, but he's a master craftsman paralleled only by a few.

Pretty guitar, btw.
Old 16th November 2009
  #8
Gear Maniac
Joe Glaser - Nashville, TN
Old 5th December 2009
  #9
Gear Head
 

If you are really attached to this neck, here is what I suggest.

Separate cloning the neck from the scalloping. I use this type of scalloping and it's just not commong enough no matter how confident a builder is that they can do both. PM me if you want to discuss that.

1) go over this in your head and make sure that this neck is really what you want to clone. You have the chance now to change things you don't like. For example, the way you scallop you need to think about neck construction - like....how it leads to the neck going south on you.

2) Pick someone to make a new neck for you. Custom luthiers are great - many of them will not make a Fender shaped headstock. Personally, I would sent it to Musikraft and have them copy it. They can do Fender headstocks if that's what you want as well. There may be better artisans, but these guys will be reasonably priced and they make good necks.

3) I've been using necks like this since the 80's and have a lot of years of experience with this. There are 2 people I have found who are capable of doing this well. One is the guy who actually did Blackmore's guitars but he does not take work orders anymore, and the other is someone who has tons of scalloping experience and from working with me, does the asymetrical style very well now. His name is Dean Cascione. Google it and you'll find him. I have pictures of the necks he's done for me.

In a nutshell - if you pm me with your # I would be happy to discuss this with you because I can't put 20-some years of experience into a message board reply.
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