The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
60s mic placement books?
Old 12th May 2003
  #1
Lives for gear
 
vtone's Avatar
 

60s mic placement books?

does anyone know if a book on experimental recording techniques of the sixties and seventies exists? I was reading about some of jimmy page's cool mic placement experiments and was wondering if anyone ever compiled a book just on some of the adventurous recording techniques happening in that time period.
Old 12th May 2003
  #2
Gear Maniac
 

me too!

I'd like to know of any books on 60's/70's recording techniques in general. (Apart from the odd r n b / rap album I'm not keen on the sound of most stuff recorded after 1981 in any genre).

One can only watch those 'classic album' dvd's so many times....

Info I'd like to know: how they got that incredible bottom end on Muscle Shoals sessions like that heard on Herbie Mann's 'Muscle Shoals Nitty Gritty'... how they processed Sly Stone's voice on You Caught Me Smilin', compressors used for those lush, warm close harmonies on C,S & N, early Doobie's, America songs, how they recorded synths in the early days (DI'd or amped up - moog modulars, etc).
How did Van Gelder get such varied signature sounds for the different labels he worked for (compare super phat Prestige drums with lots of dynamics to super-compressed, squashed CTI drum sound) - but all recorded in the same studio sometimes in the same week???

So many questions and not enough answers - not in print anyway... maybe some you old timers worked on these projects and can enlighten me?? Or perhaps no-one else gives a sh*t....
Old 14th May 2003
  #3
Lives for gear
 
vodka gimli's Avatar
 

Recording Techniques Sources

Here are some links to books that cover some of what you are looking for:



Behind The Glass

Good Vibrations

Temples of Sound

Joe Meek

Inside Tracks

All You Need Is Ears

With A Little Help From My Friends
Old 14th May 2003
  #4
Gear Maniac
 

thx

appreciate the list..!

I'll go investigate.

Burt
Old 16th May 2003
  #5
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

Re: Re: Recording Techniques Sources

Quote:
Originally posted by posterchild


one highlight was someone in the book spilling the beans on how Phil Spector got his "Wall of Sound" reverb. (He took a signal and split it into two. One signal was run directly to an echo chamber; The other one went through a tape delay and then to an echo chamber.)
That's a hoot! Absolutely EVERYBODY did that back then!

I learned studio recording from Cal Harris who was one of the first engineers at Gold Star during that period. (Cal cut basic tracks for "Good Vibrations" for Brian Wilson at Gold Star.) He told me it was mostly the leakage between different mikes and mud from the control room monitors created by a particular set-up and the particular musicians.

Prior to 16 track musical ARRANGEMENT was everything and engineering was all about not screwing it up. There's little or nothing of much value available in any books I've seen.
Old 16th May 2003
  #6
Gear Maniac
 

Motown

"There's little or nothing of much value available in any books I've seen".

That's pretty much what I expected... shame as there seem to be so many of us who dig the sound created by older techniques...

Bob - I'm pretty new to this forum... did you work out of the original Motown studio? Everytime I'm in Detroit I pay a visit to the Museum... still sends tingles down my spine down in the basement :-)

Burt
Old 16th May 2003
  #7
Lives for gear
 
robot gigante's Avatar
Quote:
There's little or nothing of much value available in any books I've seen.
That's why it would be super cool if you wrote one! Seriously.
Old 16th May 2003
  #8
Gear Addict
 

hard to find, but if you can, track down the artsy fartsy jean luc goddard film "sympathy for the devil." if you fast forward through all the hippie dippy french political crap, you get a great insight into the stones writing and recording "sympathy for the devil' in the studio. highly recommended.

-d. gauss
Old 17th May 2003
  #9
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

Re: Motown

Quote:
Originally posted by Burt
... did you work out of the original Motown studio?...
I was there!

Last Friday I showed Mike McLean, the guy who built that studio, the original RCA facilities here in Nashville. Motown Studio A's acoustical treatment was designed by the same person who designed all of RCA's facilities during the late '60s.
Old 17th May 2003
  #10
Gear Maniac
 

Motown

fantastic... you may have worked with a lot of my musical heroes - Lamont Dozier, Norman Whitfield, Ashford & Simpson, etc...

its a great museum now don't you think? Wish they had done that with more studios like Stax, etc.

respect

Burt
Old 17th May 2003
  #11
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

Re: Motown

Quote:
Originally posted by Burt

its a great museum now don't you think? Wish they had done that with more studios like Stax, etc.
I wish they'd kept on recording music in those rooms... part of me screams every time I think about one of the finest sounding small studios in the world just being a museum...
Old 17th May 2003
  #12
Lives for gear
 
littledog's Avatar
 

Is it true that all that's left of Stax is a weed-covered vacant lot?
Old 18th May 2003
  #13
Gear Addict
 

no, they opened it (Stax) up as a museum last year.

-d. gauss
Old 20th May 2003
  #14
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

I'm pretty sure the Stax building is gone but they built the museum on the site.
Old 20th May 2003
  #15
Lives for gear
 
Thermionic's Avatar
 

While we're at it, does anyone know what the Isleys used to get THAT overdriven guitar sound? It seems pretty similar throughout their catalogue, but slightly cleaner on one or two tracks such as "Who's that Lady" (maybe they used some kind of bandpass/notch?).

Been puzzling me for years, was it tube or germanium? My bet is tube, but knowing Margouleff+Cecil it could have been a custom-made unit perhaps?

Also; I've yet to hear better/more "organic"-sounding synths than Margouleff+Cecil (according to Pete Forrest's book they split-up 'cos Margouleff felt the TONTO monster-synth was a waste of cash). I reckon re-micing/amping was involved, particularly the outro on "Live It Up", one of those sonic-experiences that make life worth living IMO
Old 20th May 2003
  #16
Gear Nut
 
drummerman15's Avatar
 

Quote:
Info I'd like to know: how they got that incredible bottom end on Muscle Shoals sessions like that heard on Herbie Mann's 'Muscle Shoals Nitty Gritty'...

I may have the info on the Muscle Shoals "secret" to the wonderful bottom end. I don't know the specific song, but in one of the Beatles books mentioned in this thread, I read that McCartney was very envious of the bass sound coming from MS and set out to find the answer. The technique was the use of a monitor speaker as a microphone. Basically, take a NS-10 or other comparable (preferably 10" - or the size of the speaker in the bass cab), place it about 8-10 feet from source and run it to your favorite preamp. Pull that signal underneath a direct or close mic signal, squash it a bit, and that's the sound.

Every single McCartney bass track was recorded that way after his discovery (so the book says). Also, a friend of mine recorded with Roy Thomas Baker and they used the same technique.

I've used it several times and it adds that bottom end for sure. Also, try it on the kick drum or put 2 speakers in the drum room and use them like room mics.

Don't know for sure that its the Muscle Shoals sound, but it sure makes it sound fat!!
Old 21st May 2003
  #17
Here for the gear
 

There's is a great Beatle Studio Log book. Not exactly mic placement but they discuss what was recorded each time in the a studio and also talks about whacky stuff done in the studio to create effects, like swinging a mic back and forth from the ceiling will singing in the middle of the room or dropping a mic in a glass of water and singing into the side of the glass...
Old 21st May 2003
  #18
Gear Maniac
 

Muscle Shoals

Thx drummerman - that's great info... sure one to try!

Posterchild - I kind of agree - I LOVE the Isleys, especially the Margouleff/Cecil mid 70's period but that guitar sund is a bit too much for me



but for sure the sound of TONTO is pretty much unrivalled for sheer warmth and power - especially the bass... the Tonto's Expanding Head Band album, some of Stevie's tracks and also Gil Scott-Heron's 'Better Days Ahead' just fill my studio with lovely organic bass... amazing. I wonder how they recorded TONTO? I should think just the sheer number of slightly detuned VCO's was responsible for such a thick sound but it seems like maybe something more too - after all not all albums using large Moog Modulars sound this good.

Burt
Old 21st May 2003
  #19
Lives for gear
 
Thermionic's Avatar
 

You've got a point about the Isley guitar-sound being too-much, after a couple of albums they should've given it a rest...But I'm still curious as to how they made it.

Talking about records that abuse synths, has anyone ever heard Dick Hyman's version of "Give it up or turn it loose"?
Old 16th March 2005
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thermionic
You've got a point about the Isley guitar-sound being too-much, after a couple of albums they should've given it a rest...But I'm still curious as to how they made it.

Talking about records that abuse synths, has anyone ever heard Dick Hyman's version of "Give it up or turn it loose"?

You can get that sound by overloading a transistor mixing console's mic pre or lne gain - instant Isley!

Old 14th January 2006
  #21
Lives for gear
 
Jetblack's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by d. gauss
hard to find, but if you can, track down the artsy fartsy jean luc goddard film "sympathy for the devil." if you fast forward through all the hippie dippy french political crap, you get a great insight into the stones writing and recording "sympathy for the devil' in the studio. highly recommended.

-d. gauss

Wow dude... you really missed the point of the film. Its actaully a GREAT piece of cinema and the proof is in the collaboration. "Hippie dippy french political crap"?
Yeeee haaaawww!!!
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump