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restoring vintage synth paint jobs
Old 5th September 2009
  #1
Gear Addict
 

restoring vintage synth paint jobs

Hi!

How would you remove deep-to-the-metal scratches from vintage gear?

For example a Yamaha CS-10 that I've just purchased has a short, but deep scratch on its front panel. This synth has thick, black, matte painting.

How would you go about removing scratches like this? I've read an advice to use a sharpie, but due to the thick painting, it would leave the scratch's hole on the surface... Is there a way I could fill that up to bring into level with the original painting? Or I'd better just stick to the sharpie and leave it alone?

(Apart from this the unit is totally mint, just as if it was manufactured yesterday... Also, this info would come handy for removing scratches from other gear, too...)

Thanks,
j
Old 5th September 2009
  #2
Lives for gear
 
White Falcon's Avatar
Fill the scratch with the ink from a black permanent marker pen. You can do this a couple of times - be quick or the solvent in the pen will dissolve the ink on the synth.

Then take some furniture polish and a rag and buff the synth like it was a car; this works wonders for old synths! I always do this (after cleaning it with a mild detergent + water of course!). It works great on plastic too.

BTW. Don't pull the knobs off; they can be hard to push back on Yammies, i know this from experience having a CS-5 and a CS-40M.

Old 5th September 2009
  #3
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by White Falcon View Post
Fill the scratch with the ink from a black permanent marker pen. You can do this a couple of times - be quick or the solvent in the pen will dissolve the ink on the synth.

Then take some furniture polish and a rag and buff the synth like it was a car; this works wonders for old synths! I always do this (after cleaning it with a mild detergent + water of course!). It works great on plastic too.

BTW. Don't pull the knobs off; they can be hard to push back on Yammies, i know this from experience having a CS-5 and a CS-40M.

Thank you for the tip! It's good to hear it from someone who also had a CS-series synth

Btw would polishing result in the same matte finish as before (I guess the CS-10's finish is the same as the CS-5's, so I guess you know what I mean by this ;])? I certainly wouldn't want a shiny patch sticking out of its matte environment

Thanks,
j
Old 5th September 2009
  #4
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by White Falcon View Post
BTW. Don't pull the knobs off; they can be hard to push back on Yammies, i know this from experience having a CS-5 and a CS-40M.
Only problem is that most knob's moving range doesn't correspond to the painted scales, especially the sawtooth knob is quite off... I guess a previous owner has removed all of them when cleaning the unit and put them back without paying attention to this...

So after having received the unit I instantly did just what you advised against now (;D), and tried to remove the sawtooth knob to remedy this, but eventually saved it for later as the knob didn't come off even when I pulled hard. I guess I will leave them as they are, it's nothing I couldn't get easily used to
Old 5th September 2009
  #5
Lives for gear
 
White Falcon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsmith1261 View Post
Thank you for the tip! It's good to hear it from someone who also had a CS-series synth

Btw would polishing result in the same matte finish as before (I guess the CS-10's finish is the same as the CS-5's, so I guess you know what I mean by this ;])? I certainly wouldn't want a shiny patch sticking out of its matte environment

Thanks,
j
I still have them, and i will never sell them :-)

Oh, i meant that you should polish the whole synth, not just the area around the scratch. And the synth will become a bit "shiner", but not very much; the panel only absorbs a very small amount of polish.

Here are my polished synths:

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/4546604-post727.html

My Juno 60 looked really great after its "buffing" ;-)

(Anal, who, me?)
Old 5th September 2009
  #6
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by White Falcon View Post
I still have them, and i will never sell them :-)

Oh, i meant that you should polish the whole synth, not just the area around the scratch. And the synth will become a bit "shiner", but not very much; the panel only absorbs a very small amount of polish.

Here are my polished synths:

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/4546604-post727.html

My Juno 60 looked really great after its "buffing" ;-)

(Anal, who, me?)
Hmm impressive setup

I took note of the concept, but I guess I will just try a sharpie and save the polishing project for later when I will have more time. Good to know though that there is a complete solution

Thanks,
j
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