The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Do most AD/DA have zero latency monitoring on the way in? Monitor Controllers
Old 2nd August 2009
  #1
Lives for gear
 
filthyrich's Avatar
 

Do most AD/DA have zero latency monitoring on the way in?

I have a Motu 24 I/O that I use for all my conversion/recording/monitoring.

I have a presonus central station as well.

I'm thinking about a 2 channel ad/da for all of my overdubs and monitoring needs.

1. Does the duet or other 2 channel ad/da have no latency monitoring of the input like Cue mix does on the MOTU? (or do I have to deal with hearing what's being recorded after it hits the DAW, records, and then sends to master mix?

2. Do most of them (especially the duet) allow you to playback 2 channels (i.e the master) and still record two channels at the same time? If so..again..are the two channels that are being recorded going to be delayed or can I hear them "on the way in" and mix with the master that I'm hearing to record to?

3. Are the MOTU 24 I/o and the duet likely to work well together as far as software etc?

I would essentially be using the MOTU for recording drums only (or other sources needing more than 2 channels) if the duet were that much better.

Thanks.
Old 3rd August 2009
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Joe Porto's Avatar
 

I'm running both a Symphony/Mac Pro 8-core and a Duet/Macbook Pro 13" at 32 sample buffer, with no noticeable latency even when monitoring using plugins.

I don't think you'll be able to use the Duet and Motu at the same time, as you can only choose a single interface in your DAW. I know for a fact that you cannot use two duets simultaneously.
Old 3rd August 2009
  #3
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by filthyrich View Post
I have a Motu 24 I/O that I use for all my conversion/recording/monitoring.

I have a presonus central station as well.

I'm thinking about a 2 channel ad/da for all of my overdubs and monitoring needs.

1. Does the duet or other 2 channel ad/da have no latency monitoring of the input like Cue mix does on the MOTU? (or do I have to deal with hearing what's being recorded after it hits the DAW, records, and then sends to master mix?

2. Do most of them (especially the duet) allow you to playback 2 channels (i.e the master) and still record two channels at the same time? If so..again..are the two channels that are being recorded going to be delayed or can I hear them "on the way in" and mix with the master that I'm hearing to record to?

3. Are the MOTU 24 I/o and the duet likely to work well together as far as software etc?

I would essentially be using the MOTU for recording drums only (or other sources needing more than 2 channels) if the duet were that much better.

Thanks.
1) "The Maestro mixer serves to provide a low latency monitoring mix while recording."

Source: Duet User Manual - Page 21

2) "The Maestro mixer provides the ability to blend Duet’s hardware inputs with playback from an audio application, and route the resulting mix to Duet’s hardware outputs. Using the Maestro mixer, it’s possible to create a monitor mix where latency isn’t a problem."

Source: Duet User Manual - Page 21

3) "The answer all depends on which MIDI + Audio application you want to run, and which type of soundcard drivers it uses. Although Steinberg's Cubase can run with multiple soundcards from different manufacturers, it can only do so on the PC when running its ASIO Multimedia or ASIO DirectX drivers, neither of which provide low latency. Only true ASIO drivers on either Mac or PC will give you the responsiveness of latencies lower than about 20ms, but unfortunately you can only choose a single ASIO driver from within Cubase, so you could only use one of the three cards at a time.

MOTU's 24I/O interface provides 24 simultaneous inputs and outputs from a single PCI card.
MOTU's 24I/O interface provides 24 simultaneous inputs and outputs from a single PCI card.
If, on the other hand, you're using Cakewalk Sonar on the PC, you'll probably be taking advantage of its support for WDM drivers, which can be run in tandem across multiple soundcards of differing makes and models, as well as providing fairly low latency. In most cases you'll be able to run several different soundcards side by side without problems, although there are no guarantees, and some rare combinations may suffer from audio clicks and pops, or cause your computer to crash occasionally or even refuse to boot up at all.

However, if your cards are different, and even if you do manage to run them all simultaneously from a suitable application, you will have to lock their timing together externally. Most 8-in/8-out cards offer S/PDIF I/O, and sometimes word clock, and either of these can be used for sync. Designate one card as Master (therefore running from its Internal clock signal), wire its S/PDIF or word clock output to the S/PDIF or Word clock input of the second card and set the second to expect an external clock. Make the same connection between the second and third cards, with the third also relying on external sync.

If you don't do this, the three cards will 'freewheel', and while they may start in perfect sync they will gradually drift apart during the course of a song, giving rise to possible flanging between tracks running on the different cards, and eventually (on long songs) more obvious inter-track timing problems.

Some manufacturers write soundcard drivers that support multiple cards of the same family, and which can also be internally synchronised to sample accuracy using proprietary sync cables. This is by far the easiest way to approach your problem, since with three identical soundcards of this type you simply end up with an assembly that acts as one huge soundcard with 24 ins and outs, but which appears to ASIO audio applications as one device that can therefore be used with Cubase.

Personally, if I owned a large Soundtracs mixing desk I'd find out which of the three existing cards has drivers that support expansion, and then buy two more cards of the same type — this is the only real way to get professional results when transferring 24 simultaneous tracks from a computer. Alternatively, MOTU's 24I/O interface provides 24 ins and outs from a single PCI card. You could also combine a 24-channel digital audio card with external D-A converters.
"

Source: Sound On Sound - Sound Advice

Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
yuppie / So Much Gear, So Little Time
11
erudolph / Music Computers
0
daaronhoffman / Music Computers
5
tazman / So Much Gear, So Little Time
3
tazman / Music Computers
2

Forum Jump
Forum Jump