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Biggest Production Pet Peves
Old 24th June 2009
  #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LimeMusic View Post
I know. I hate it when the bass guitar is mixed straight down the middle. I'm thinking, "The bass player was standing to my left when I saw the band live, so why is he panned as if he's standing in front of the kick drum? He should be panned 70% to the left."

No disrespect, I just think this whole audience/player perspective argument is completely pointless.


As far as production pet peeves:
I just can't stand it when an R&B/ Hip Hop artist has an up-and-coming artist rap after the second chorus. It was cool and interesting 8 years ago... Can we come up with something new now?
I don't think anyone has ever presented a standard as a hardened rule not to be broken on this site, but, many posts have been misunderstood to be just that and flame wars have ensued.
That's my pet peeve, that, and the subtle use of autotune, I hate that too, over compression too. I'd rather retake it. I don't want to fix singers so they can come back and sing $hitty all day so I can fix them for a week, they need to learn how to sing.
Old 24th June 2009
  #62
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mine would have to be

badly compressed vocals were you can hear the incorrectly set attack messing with the starts of words. Theres a track on Duffys album I cant listen to because of this .

overcompresed snare drums were they end up sounding small and 'bocky'

Snare drums that are tuned too high - pingy - these are often the result of being tuned by the producer or drummer whose 'loves a sweet tone and a bit of crack ' in the snare then they want you to make it massively dark and deep when mixing .

Drummers who smash the crap out their hihats with the wrong weight of sticks with innapropriatly clangly hats.

ukeleles, anytime, anywere- worst instrument on the planet. Banjo's in rock songs. guitar players who think they can play the bass....

shall stop rant at this point...

Gil
Old 24th June 2009
  #63
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For a man who loves drum machines and funky loops, I am extremely bored with the predominance of synthetic, quantized sounds in most pop songs. I can't tell you how many times I hear a song on the radio and think how much better the entire production would sound *and* feel if only there was a kickass group of session players comping the backing tracks.

In other words, I'd like more humanity in pop.


Gregory Scott - ubk
.
Old 24th June 2009
  #64
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I don't think you can pinpoint humanity to something like unquantized drums or synthesizer sounds. Songs are to judged as a whole, there are thousands and thousands of pop songs made with drum machines that reek of humanity and soul and there are just as many cold, sterile recordings played by a human hand. Either the song, as a whole, works or it doesn't, sometimes it needs a quantized drum machine kick to make it work, sometimes all it needs is a man and a guitar. It's not like Kraftwerk or Tangerine Dream would be better had they been "real" bands. Likewise, Bob Dylan probably wouldn't have been better with a 303 and a vocoder.

I'm pretty sure they had these same discussions when the first mic and recorder was invented and again when the multitracker was invented. There are no recording techniques that are better than the other, it's all about how you use them. Acoustic guitar isn't better than electric, cowskin isn't better than drummachine. If anything, things are better these days because we have more options, there's nothing stopping us from recording a band to a 2-track in one take if we so choose to, back in the day they had no option. We can choose to replace drums with samples if the recording really needs it, but there is no law telling us that we have to. It's all choices, choices they didn't have back then.

A huge majority of music has always sounded horrible, we just tend to remember the Dylans and the Beatleses and the Zeppelins and the Fleetwood Macs, not the bad ones. Each generation has it's own autotune. It's only a matter of moments when someone invents a new fad and everyone goes "woah, I need that", fast forward a few years and everyone's complaining how stale it sounds and how everything used to be better back in the days when all we had was drum replacement and autotune, none of that new, soulless, inhuman machine ****.
Old 24th June 2009
  #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barfunkel View Post
I don't think you can pinpoint humanity to something like unquantized drums or synthesizer sounds. Songs are to judged as a whole, there are thousands and thousands of pop songs made with drum machines that reek of humanity and soul and there are just as many cold, sterile recordings played by a human hand. Either the song, as a whole, works or it doesn't, sometimes it needs a quantized drum machine kick to make it work, sometimes all it needs is a man and a guitar. It's not like Kraftwerk or Tangerine Dream would be better had they been "real" bands. Likewise, Bob Dylan probably wouldn't have been better with a 303 and a vocoder.

I'm pretty sure they had these same discussions when the first mic and recorder was invented and again when the multitracker was invented. There are no recording techniques that are better than the other, it's all about how you use them. Acoustic guitar isn't better than electric, cowskin isn't better than drummachine. If anything, things are better these days because we have more options, there's nothing stopping us from recording a band to a 2-track in one take if we so choose to, back in the day they had no option. We can choose to replace drums with samples if the recording really needs it, but there is no law telling us that we have to. It's all choices, choices they didn't have back then.

A huge majority of music has always sounded horrible, we just tend to remember the Dylans and the Beatleses and the Zeppelins and the Fleetwood Macs, not the bad ones. Each generation has it's own autotune. It's only a matter of moments when someone invents a new fad and everyone goes "woah, I need that", fast forward a few years and everyone's complaining how stale it sounds and how everything used to be better back in the days when all we had was drum replacement and autotune, none of that new, soulless, inhuman machine ****.
Pretty sure we all know that, this is entitled "biggest production pet peeves", not "let's argue with people about their owned up to and owned pet peeves." When that thread starts, which it should, in the moan zone, you should set an alert for it.

So there's another pet peeve of mine, when production peeps make an argument that's "pro bad music, because it's always existed", who cares if bad music has always existed, it's only worse if they WEREN'T trying to make bad music but did.
Like myself.
Old 24th June 2009
  #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LimeMusic View Post
No disrespect, I just think this whole audience/player perspective argument is completely pointless.
Traditional jazz recording is documentation and therefore this might be desirable.

In rock/pop/hh/etc recording the studio is an instrument where ANYTHING is allowed, a canvas where you can paint anything, anyway to sound good.
Old 24th June 2009
  #67
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Alright from this point onward! No more angst about audience perspective and non audience etc. This is a forum, NOT THE DINNER TABLE!

_________________

Pet peve - reversed guitar solos - after 1970 I think its become a tad cliche.
Old 24th June 2009
  #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by u b k View Post
For a man who loves drum machines and funky loops, I am extremely bored with the predominance of synthetic, quantized sounds in most pop songs. I can't tell you how many times I hear a song on the radio and think how much better the entire production would sound *and* feel if only there was a kickass group of session players comping the backing tracks.

In other words, I'd like more humanity in pop.


Gregory Scott - ubk
.
Maybe I'm getting off topic but this raises an interesting question for me.
Why is/was the humanity replaced, to the degree that it has been? Is this just a natural occurance as the evolution of technology progresses? It certainly has opened the door for the one guy, or two, does it all scenario that we have today.
How much of it though is the ever shrinking budgets? Record companies no longer have to foot the bill for a plethora of session musicians and studio time.
Or is it just a phase? Will suddenly someone someday down the road do a dance track with real players and be hailed as a genius for such a brilliant new and fresh approach?
I think all it would take would be for a huge mega producer like Timbaland to do this. Hire players to play the parts indstead of programming or sampling. It would probably be the next big thing..........again.......maybe......
Old 24th June 2009
  #69
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Four-to-the-floor kick drums (highly compressed, most often); MIDI quantization; sample looping; and generalized use of compression on most tracks and the mix; are probably the production techniques that result in most of my most favorite music.

So, then, I guess a "transparent," full-range recording of acoustic and/or non-overdriven electrical instruments would be my biggest production pet peeve; "realism," and the belief in- or the effort to achieve- it, generally speaking.
Old 24th June 2009
  #70
Gear Nut
 

For me:

Anything that chases the last sound/trick/gimmick of the previous hit for far too many years. (or even once!) - OK, I know the argument to support this, and I get it, but...

The horrible "something happens every 5 seconds because we piled all these tracks on and we have a boner for automation".

The awesome "vocal through a telephone/radio/walkie-talkie".

The pedal steel that happens once in a "country" song with way too much vibrato.

The singer's performance where you can almost hear him or her crying. Almost.

The rock singer's "Devil-Lite" vocal. Not as scary as your actual Satan-y singer, but still...some of that "vibe".

Auotuning genuinely great singers.

And, sorry, but tuned singers that really could never sing in the first place.
Old 24th June 2009
  #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyd123 View Post
Will suddenly someone someday down the road do a dance track with real players and be hailed as a genius for such a brilliant new and fresh approach?
I think all it would take would be for a huge mega producer like Timbaland to do this. Hire players to play the parts indstead of programming or sampling. It would probably be the next big thing..........again.......maybe......

LOL! I've been doing that for 3 years now.... (much to my hipster friends' disbelief !! lol..) ........ but I'm a nobody so.

When I was a young club hopper, I always wanted dance songs to have a build up, a climax, like a guitar solo or something. So now I create them, nothing like an ass shaker with real instruments and a JIMI Hendrix style solo on top of it.
Something to make even the music snobs smirk....he.he.

Steely
Old 24th June 2009
  #72
Gear Head
 

Quick question: What is four-to-the-floor kick drum? I've never heard that term, but it sounds like something I could really enjoy hating.

Peeves of mine are mostly the above listed, and I also dislike over-produced guitar harmonics. Those metal songs where they put that way too obvious harmonic vibrato lick in.

Also Nickelback. Everything about that band is a peeve of mine. That new "Something in your mouth" song has zero class, the words "pretty pink thong" do not sound right in a song that isn't sung by Sisqo.

And current rap. It all sounds so "now" instead of "timeless." i.e.-Snoop Doggy Doggs "Doggystyle" will forever be loved. Lil John's sweat dripping [email protected] will not (I hope).

Screaming the hook is not a hook at all. Give me something I can walk away with besides a headache.

Did I mention I hate Nickelback? Seriously, I really hate that band. "I like your pants around your feet?" Those are the lyrics you settled on for your highly produced expensive record?

You know, one peeve I think we all (should) share is the general uneducated state of the consumer. When the corporate machine shoves enough poo down the average iPod owners throat (Jonus Brothers), some people will aquire a taste for it because its all they know. And what is the deal with Disney lately and their tween music being all over the place?

Nickelback sucks.
Old 24th June 2009
  #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barfunkel View Post
I don't think you can pinpoint humanity to something like unquantized drums or synthesizer sounds.

I can, and I do.

Please also note, I didn't say "synthesizer sounds," I said "synthesized sounds."


Gregory Scott - ubk
Old 24th June 2009
  #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shimona View Post
Quick question: What is four-to-the-floor kick drum? I've never heard that term, but it sounds like something I could really enjoy hating.
That's referring to the dance scene. Dance music, especially house, is driven by a kick drum pounding relentlessly on all four quarter notes per bar.
Old 24th June 2009
  #75
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Bumper sticker slogans made into songs in a lame attempt to cash in on something that's kitchy --- even worse when the singer sings it as if it were some deeply felt emotion ---- this is mostly in country music and occasionally in hard rock.
Old 24th June 2009
  #76
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Songs that use the words "fall down" or "pick you up" or any variation on that.

ALSO

People who remake songs and don't change anything to make it their own. So its essentially a duplicate of something that was already good. Or try to remake an old classic, but pump up the production value so it has no soul.

OH AND

When numbers and such are used in place of words on song labels. I love Temple of the Dog, but Say Hello 2 Heaven, really Cornell, really? Let me tie my sweater around my waste.
Old 24th June 2009
  #77
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Not strictly production, but lazy songwriting peeves me.

When every song in a pop or rock record is based around a I-IV-V progression, it makes me think that either the artists are poor songwriters, and/or the producers needs to expand their horizons when selecting material.

Cheers,
++aldo
Old 24th June 2009
  #78
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyd123 View Post
That's referring to the dance scene. Dance music, especially house, is driven by a kick drum pounding relentlessly on all four quarter notes per bar.
Thanks for answering that for me! For sure I can hate that: Boom Ssss Boom Ssss Boom Ssss Boom Ssss Boom Ssss Boom Ssss Boom Ssss Boom Ssss Boom Ssss.
Old 24th June 2009
  #79
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Lyrics to the likes of "that's why I write this song, all I do is write this song, this is my song" etc.

I don't know why but that drives me nuts!

I like drummers perspective but of course I'm a drummer, when I mix live it's audience or mono though.
Old 24th June 2009
  #80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyd123 View Post
This ain't the first time and it won't be the last but for me it's the excessive autotune.
I know, not a creative or surprising response, but it is a huge pet peeve for me.
I can never really decide which bugs me (overall) worse: obvious Auto-Tune use/abuse or simply clumsy corrective use.

There's almost a whole decade of Nashville pop -- and even some stuff you could almost call country -- that's all but unlistenable to me because of all the obvious "little" vocal retuning artifacts scattered through the songs. I mean, someone -- some tin-ear -- obviously thought they were putting something over on us, that it was good enough -- but it sounds like ****. As I always say, I don't mind A-T or other vocal retuning, I just don't want to hear it.


Now, intellectually, conscious, obvious, over the top A-T 'abuse' seems to me a simple aesthetic choice. It's not a matter of doing a criminally obvious job at editing/correction -- it's not incompetence -- it's just an aesthetic choice.

An aesthetic choice that makes me want to rip my ears off the sides of my head and FedEx them to the 19th century where they'll never have to hear that horrible sound again.


Scanning some of the intervening posts that focus on songwriting: I think I'm guilty of almost every songwriting sin listed above... heh
Old 24th June 2009
  #81
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Average music that even makes it to the production process baffles me.

Maybe it's me, or I take this stuff to heart too much, but turning on the radio after not listening to it for years and hearing somebody using someone elses song to "sing" over and has already sold 5 million copies by week 1 and the person singing it doesn't even know who the original artist who wrote the song is... .. . . . can't .... think. . . . straight... . . . . bad .. . dream . m.m.mm.

Another one is the dreaded " dance remix" to an already danceable song!!

Recently I got kicked out of my towns local "dance club" for being an extremelly opinionated crappy music intollerant drunk. I was having an alright time with my wife and friends until the D.J cued up Stevie Wonder's
"Boggie on Reggae woman" (which as you know already is an ass shakin, beautiful groove )......... with a club beat.....

Having already had my share of Saffire and tonics I stormed the D.J. booth
to thank him for "playing this dance version, because I can FINALLY hear where the beat is, and can dance to it for the first time !!(giving the 4 on floor head nod as a clue).... after he and his cohearts finally seemed to see past my shenanegans, asked me to leave the booth, and later, the club in general. Not before I made it out to the dance floor and went into every cliched' dance club move (to the dismay of most participants) I could conjure........I'm not much of a dancer.
UNACCEPTABLE!!
Old 24th June 2009
  #82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philip S Bova View Post
Songs that start with a lofi (AM radio type) effect on the full mix until the first chorus, then kick in full blast. Can't stand that. Also, anything trick that removes the soul from a good performance in order to fit it into the grid. Arrrrh!

philip
First couple hundred times I heard this in different songs, I sort of liked it. heh

It's yet another cliche that's been pushed into insufferability by the rampant me-tooism that's beset the music industry increasingly as markets shrink, genres narrow, and creative minds wander elsewhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bonnybilly View Post
****ty radio/telephone effects.

When a dramatic pause happens the audio is chopped given a dead air kind of eefect...bleh!

Vocal harmonies/effects everywhere

Banjo in a rock song (nah i quite like that actually)

A rapper on one of the verses or a rock/pop/rnb song....boring.

The current trend of indie bands using orchestral/wacky instruments is getting old.

**** songs with HUGE productions. What a waste of money.
All of the above... including the love/hate/ambivalence on banjo in rock/alt/art rock. I love the sound of a well placed banjo -- but when everyone does it for a sort of automatic retro/quaint/small/arty feel, it's as bad as too much of anything else that can be good in the right place and time -- and dosage. [Being a big bluegrass/mountain music fan, I'm willing to cut those cats some slack. heh ]

Quote:
Originally Posted by unclejoe View Post
It's all just a bit negative isn't it? Its only music. person A likes this but doesn't like that and person B vice verca. Live and let live I say. If you don't like it, don't buy it. If you prefer something else, buy that and show your support for what you believe in.

I guess what I mean is why not try saying what you DO like rather than what you "hate", and maybe the world will be a slightly more positive place?

oh well. We can live in hope.
You're just not getting into the spirit of this thing here. heh

Quote:
Originally Posted by deeper View Post
My biggest pet peeve, musically, would be the non-stop, four-on-the-floor kick drum. It's not music. My washing machine can do that. But music has variation and feeling.
If one carefully unbalances his wash load, he cant sometimes get quite a nice syncopation, depending, of course, on the machine. I find the room is an important factor in getting the best sound on a washer. Most folks go for the smal, hard room sound on their washing machines, but I like a little dampening, cut down on early reflections. I find water softener gives a warmer, more natural sound -- but I can't stand the soapy film it seems to leave.

Quote:
Originally Posted by superwack View Post
My #1 has to be the ill-prepared/uninterested/uninspired musicians themselves.

Did a tracking session for a band recently... the bass player forgot his bass! Next day we did some keyboard overdubs. the keyboard player was late cuz HE forgot to pickup his synth... [...]
I can't top any of that. Mmm... check that. The drummer who had to have the fact that people sometimes tune drums explained to him -- it was something he'd never heard before -- sort of amazed me. When he saw me pull out a drum key the studio had in a junk drawer he said, wow, now I know what that was for! I thought it was, like, a furnace key or something that got thrown in by mistake.
Old 24th June 2009
  #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
First couple hundred times I heard this in different songs, I sort of liked it. heh

It's yet another cliche that's been pushed into insufferability by the rampant me-tooism that's beset the music industry increasingly as markets shrink, genres narrow, and creative minds wander elsewhere.
.
Seee???? Musical Bandwagonism........ it ruins what is initially very good
Old 24th June 2009
  #84
Quote:
Originally Posted by JP11 View Post
[...]

I don't think Bob Dylan would sing the way he did if he didn't copy and "fake" it a bit (or a lot), a least at first...

many or most pop singers are "putting it on" to a certain degree, or a great degree, copying or imitating who they like or liked growing up...
If you drop in on Dylan's career in different time zones, you'll hear some very different approaches. The first album is almost kind of natural seeming. Yet at the time, he was often compared to earlier folk and blues singers. For a while back then, everyone seemed to parrot the idea that Dylan had shamelessly copped Ramblin' Jack Elliot's style but when I go back and listen to the old Elliot stuff nowadays, I guess we've just had so many 'Dylanesque' singers flow under the bridge (the 70s were especially lousy with them) that he actually seems pretty different from Dylan and his follow-ons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by casadios View Post
[...] "don't worry, we'll fix it in the mix" instead of getting it right the first time.
We all know by now -- the place to fix a song is in the mastering!

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
[...]
"Leave the clams in!" -Chester Atkins
That's easy for Chet to say.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcleardaze View Post
I think you could lump cookie monster, shrieking and indistinguishable grunts to that --- I like the music in alot of modern metal, but the vocals (or lack of as the case may be) can make it not so enjoyable to listen to. maybe I'm just too old to get it, afterall my father coudln't stand AC/DC, and i love em all the way around.
I did love that Attack Attack! (not to be confused with Aussie band Attack! Attack!) video that was posted in here yesterday: Please watch this video [that's the title of the thread, not an imprecation from me... but it's a pretty funny video, I gotta tell you.]

That was special, combining so much cookie monster/screamo/mic gargling with completely retuned sung vocals... it was cool... I don't think I was able to understand a single word of either vocal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Makinithappen View Post
My pet peve is fade-outs... you went through the trouble of writing a song... write a damn ending. (there are, of course, exceptions where it fits the song really well but most of the time it sounds lazy to me) I've done albums where 14 out of 15 songs were fade outs.

BTW... I love that rockabilly slapback and use it anytime I see a chance that I could get away with it! and as a drummer, I also rock air drums so drummers perspective it is.
Quote:
Originally Posted by doug hazelrigg View Post
I've heard this before. Myself, I LOVE fade outs -- it makes it seem like the song goes on forever
Quote:
Originally Posted by personpitch View Post
+1 on fade outs. I've started a war
I'm not sure when but someplace along the way I developed a thing about fadeouts. A negative thing. That said, every once in a great while, a fadeout really works. And it is special. Let's keep it that way. heh

Quote:
Originally Posted by personpitch View Post
Alright from this point onward! No more angst about audience perspective and non audience etc. This is a forum, NOT THE DINNER TABLE!

_________________

Pet peve - reversed guitar solos - after 1970 I think its become a tad cliche.
I just got done with lunch in front of my computer... speak for yourself. heh

With regard to reversed guitar solos... agreed. And I'd extend that to reversed guitar fingerpicking and such -- if it didn't pop up way too much in my own stuff. I'm bad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shimona View Post
[...]

Peeves of mine are mostly the above listed, and I also dislike over-produced guitar harmonics. Those metal songs where they put that way too obvious harmonic vibrato lick in.

Also Nickelback. Everything about that band is a peeve of mine. That new "Something in your mouth" song has zero class, the words "pretty pink thong" do not sound right in a song that isn't sung by Sisqo.

[...]

Did I mention I hate Nickelback? Seriously, I really hate that band. "I like your pants around your feet?" Those are the lyrics you settled on for your highly produced expensive record?
[...]
That harmonic pinch. I thought Attack Attack!'s aforementioned vid captured it nicely though: one little perfect pinch -- almost as though it was dropped into that perfect little hole that opened up for in in the rhythm.

Not a Nickelback fan, either. But I sorta like that line. I didn't know they were openly gay. Nice to see some diversity in rock.

heh



Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcleardaze View Post
Bumper sticker slogans made into songs in a lame attempt to cash in on something that's kitchy --- even worse when the singer sings it as if it were some deeply felt emotion ---- this is mostly in country music and occasionally in hard rock.
Agreed... except when I do it. I normally try to ignore the popular culture like the plague it is but when some pop trauma makes its way onto the Google News page, I sometimes find myself getting sucked in.

As soon as Bristol Palin and her Baby Daddy broke up, I found myself compelled to write "Bristol Don't Go." Which is, basically, as charged. And programmed drums, to boot... no backwards guitar, though. It followed my paean to Britney's preggers little sister and the father of her child, "Lyin' Cheatin' Baby Daddy Dog Little Boy" (Not quite office safe.)
Old 24th June 2009
  #85
Jax
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Quote:
Originally Posted by personpitch View Post
I would like/interested to know how many people get incredibly angry at certain production techniques used on independent/commercial releases of past or present. Hopefully the thread has enough gusto to get airborn.

Basically anything and everything flies, even if its considered the norm.

Aaaaaannnddd GO!
Drum samples really annoy me! Sure, they sound good but now, too much music sounds too much the same -- not because they are using the same samples, but because everyone uses samples. It has removed the dynamic, human element that a great drummer brings to a song. There are some top flight mixers who can do this well enough that it works, but to my ears, most mixers are doing it in a very cold, robotic way.

This goes for all other sampled instruments as well. I understand why it has become the norm, but I'm not digging it.
Old 24th June 2009
  #86
Jax
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelyfan View Post
You lost me at "It's only music".
Yup. If the guy who posted that is working in audio and thinks "it's only music," I suggest he looks for another career. Seriously.
Old 24th June 2009
  #87
Jax
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Wrong. That's not the way the audience hears it. Mixing should always be from the audience perspective. The audience doesn't sit in the middle of the stage.
I totally disagree. First, that there is a "should be" rule. Second, the panning that serves the music best is usually the best panning... for the music.
Old 24th June 2009
  #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
If you drop in on Dylan's career in different time zones, you'll hear some very different approaches. The first album is almost kind of natural seeming. Yet at the time, he was often compared to earlier folk and blues singers. For a while back then, everyone seemed to parrot the idea that Dylan had shamelessly copped Ramblin' Jack Elliot's style but when I go back and listen to the old Elliot stuff nowadays, I guess we've just had so many 'Dylanesque' singers flow under the bridge (the 70s were especially lousy with them) that he actually seems pretty different from Dylan and his follow-ons.
I read a biography on him, and I don't recall much heh, but I seem to recall that his first performances in high school were doing Little Richard and playing the piano!! Then he "turned" folk...

Don't know how most people talk or sing up there in Minnesota, but Dylan sounds like he's from Oklahoma or somewhere, don't he?

Found this in an article:

Dylan’s voice was, in some ways, as startling as his lyrics. New York Times critic Robert Shelton described Dylan's early vocal style as "a rusty voice suggesting Guthrie's old performances, etched in gravel like Dave Van Ronk's."When the young Bobby Womack told Sam Cooke he didn’t understand Dylan’s vocal style, Cooke explained that: “from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth.” Rolling Stone magazine ranked Dylan at number seven in their 2008 listing of “The 100 Greatest Singers of All Time”. Bono commented that “Dylan has tried out so many personas in his singing because it is the way he inhabits his subject matter.”


Interesting how Cooke says "believing that the voice is telling the truth" and then Bono says, "tried out so many personas", and then of course all those who imitated Dylan including people like John Lennon...

so I guess the moral is, you can be a bit phony as long as people believe you...
Old 24th June 2009
  #89
Quote:
"When the young Bobby Womack told Sam Cooke he didn’t understand Dylan’s vocal style, Cooke explained that: “from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth.”
The thousand layers of Dylan's personae notwithstanding -- that's a great quote from Cooke. He had his finger on the pulse of the era...

... for such a short time.
Old 25th June 2009
  #90
Gear Maniac
 
obliterations's Avatar
 

I hate that general midi whistle sound.
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