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Mixing questions (from Roger Nichols site)
Old 11th August 2005
  #1
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Gregg Sartiano's Avatar
 

Mixing questions (from Roger Nichols site)

This is a cut-and-paste from the Roger Nichols seminar site -- I guess it represents topics he covers.

There are some nuggets in here. Who wants to answer one or a few?

_________________________________________________________

How do I start my mix? Which instruments do I start working on first? I end up going around in circles, chasing my tail, if I had a tail!


How do I get the ultimate drum sound on my record? Can I make a lousey recording of drums sound good in the mix? Can I make good sounding drums sound bad in the mix?

Should I always record the bass with a direct box, or should I mic the amp? How come I can never get the bass to sound the way I want in the mix?

Should I spread the piano hard left and right? Does it help if I use 4 or 5 mics on the piano? The studio said the piano was tuned a couple of weeks ago, it that good enough?

Does it help if I double-track all of the guitars? How about 12 tracks of guitars?

I record lots of percussion on my records, but I can never hear what I want in the mix. How do I keep the percussion from getting burried in the track?

How do I get a clear vocal sound and still keep it above the track? When I limit the whole track to make it louder the vocal gets burried.

I am stumped when it comes to panning. I usually just spread out all of the stereo tracks and put the solos in the center. Is this the right way to do it?

I keep doubling and trippling the background vocals, but I just can't get that big vocal feel I like.

I have added horns and strings to my kick-butt love ballad, but I just can't get that Lionel Richie killer mix that I was reaching for.

I record the tracks myself and then the producer sends the session out to someone else to overdub drums, or guitars, or horns. How do I know if I can get everything put back into my Pro Tools session properly?

Should I use compressors on the stereo bus to make my mix louder? Do I need to make my mixes so loud?

Are multi-band compressors any better than regular compressors?

How come I have to use so many external reverb units and reverb plug-ins, and the reverb still doesn't sound right?

How do you make sure that the vocal parts that I fly around to other sections of the song line up correctly?

Is it ok to use AutoTune on the entire vocal track? How should I go about tuning tracks that need it without things getting out of hand?

What is the best microphone to use on lead vocal?

I was told to record everything as loud as I could without going over, now during the mix I have to pull the fader way down to get the right level. The problem is that small moves make too big of a change in level and I can't get the balance right. Was I wrong to record so hot?

What is the difference in mix-buss resolution? Does it make any difference?

What are the real differences between 16 bit, 24bit, and 32bit floating point?

How about the differences between 48kHz, 96kHz, 192kHz, DSD, DVD-A, and PDQ-Bach?

What should I mix to? Should I bounce-to-disk, mix to DAT tape, Masterlink, or analog tape?

If I send my mix to a mastering facility, what format should I send to them? If I want my mix loud should I make it loud, or should I let the mastering house do it? How is he going to know how much louder I want my mix if I don't do it before I send it?

After my record is a hit should I buy a Farrari or Lamborghini? Is the flat-12 better than the V-12 engine?

I heard the Pro Tools HD with version 6.1 software is certified for "known ice". Is that true? Where do they hide the de-ice boots?
Old 12th August 2005
  #2
Lives for gear
 
djui5's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregg Sartiano
How do I start my mix? Which instruments do I start working on first? I end up going around in circles, chasing my tail, if I had a tail!
How I start a mix depends on what I'm mixing. Today I tried something new. I got the mix sounding full and balanced without reverbs or delays, just by balancing the tracks and setting comp/eq's properly. Then I added in verb and delay until I got it where I wanted. It was a fresh/frustrating perspective.
If I'm doing a vocal oriented album, I'll do the vocals first. Get them sounding great, then add in the main "hook" sounds. Usually guitars, keys, pianos and that such. Then I'll add in the bed/rythm tracks, and last everything else.

Quote:
How do I get the ultimate drum sound on my record? Can I make a lousey recording of drums sound good in the mix? Can I make good sounding drums sound bad in the mix?
The ultimate drum sound comes from well recorded drums in a great sounding room. Mixing is just "icing on the cake" if you know what I mean.
It's really easy to make drums sound bad in a mix, easier than making them sound good

Quote:
Should I always record the bass with a direct box, or should I mic the amp? How come I can never get the bass to sound the way I want in the mix?
DI is fine for certain styles. Other applications require mic'ing the amp and using DI. Mixing bass (for me) is the hardest part. My biggest problem is the room I'm working in right now. It has bass problems that need to be addressed, and soon. Getting the bass right in a song takes lot's of practice...lot's of it. Keep working at it, you'll figure it out soon enough. The most important thing is to have a room that you can hear the bass properly in. You can't mix what you can't hear right?


Quote:
Should I spread the piano hard left and right? Does it help if I use 4 or 5 mics on the piano? The studio said the piano was tuned a couple of weeks ago, it that good enough?
A great piano recording can be had with 1 mic, or 3 mic's at the most. Any more than that is un-necessary and will cause more problems than it will do good.
Panning hard left and right is fine if it works for the song and retains the paino's proper imaging. Sometimes you wanna squash it with a limiter, cut the high end of fit and the super low end, and pan it left with a dirty guitar on the right. It really depends on the song and style of music. Sometimes the piano is everything. Sometimes it's an accent like a B3/Leslie pad.
A couple weeks is ok as long as the temperature hasen't changed a lot and it hasen't been played at all.

Quote:
Does it help if I double-track all of the guitars? How about 12 tracks of guitars?
If it works for the song, do it. Mutt's been known for having over 100 guitar tracks (Mike Shipley said something about this). Other bands have used a single guitar track and it worked. White Stripes comes to mind.

Quote:
I record lots of percussion on my records, but I can never hear what I want in the mix. How do I keep the percussion from getting burried in the track?
Getting it properly recorded is the first step. Then putting it in it's proper place in the mix is step 2. Using comp/eq usually works for me. Percussion can eat up a lot of the same freq's as guitars, piano, vocals, string instruments, a lot of $hit. Panning helps a ton.

Quote:
How do I get a clear vocal sound and still keep it above the track? When I limit the whole track to make it louder the vocal gets burried.
Proper compression/serial compression works great. So does lot's of automation and eq. My vocal tracks are always very present. They are very very clear and intelligible, but sit in the track properly. The vocal automation is usually insane to get sounds like this. There's so much changing and going on, you gotta keep on top of it.

Quote:
I am stumped when it comes to panning. I usually just spread out all of the stereo tracks and put the solos in the center. Is this the right way to do it?
Again, this depends on the song, but everything needs it's own space. EQ is part of it, panning is another big role. Verb and delay play a role also. Panning is really really important to getting a good mix. What I usually do is get the mix the way I like it, then find anything that I can't "hear" and play with the panning before grabbing the fader or eq. Sometimes you'll find a place that it "pop's out". If not, put it somewhere away from everything else and automate/eq until it comes out.


Quote:
I keep doubling and trippling the background vocals, but I just can't get that big vocal feel I like.
Panning, proper levels, and a bit of compression all contribute to this. Some good verb or chorus fx helps make them a lot bigger also. A good recording is also required to get a big bgv track, of course.

Quote:
I have added horns and strings to my kick-butt love ballad, but I just can't get that Lionel Richie killer mix that I was reaching for.
Hire Lionel Richies mixer.

Quote:
I record the tracks myself and then the producer sends the session out to someone else to overdub drums, or guitars, or horns. How do I know if I can get everything put back into my Pro Tools session properly?
Consult with the recording engineer to ensure that he/she "consolidates" all the tracks with the same starting point. Also make sure he/she names the tracks properly, and includes alternate takes. Make sure he's using .wav files, if not have him/her make them .wav files. That should take care of it.

Quote:
Should I use compressors on the stereo bus to make my mix louder? Do I need to make my mixes so loud?
I use compression/limiting on the stereo buss. You have to be really really careful with it though. Don't use it to "make things as loud as you can get them", but more as a "glue" for the mix, or to help control things. It's really easy to let it get away from you and can easily ruin a mix. Save the "loudness" for the mastering engineer. (Brad Blackwood does great work!) /plug

Quote:
Are multi-band compressors any better than regular compressors?
Not "better", but different. Each has it's own application. One works great for one thing, but the other works better for another thing. Learn your tools and how they work/react to audio/things. That's the best I can give you.

Quote:
How come I have to use so many external reverb units and reverb plug-ins, and the reverb still doesn't sound right?
It's hard to say. It's probably because your using so many different units. When using a lot of verb units, you have to know what your doing to keep from crapping it all out through the mix buss. You can build up crap at the hard left/right area by panning all your verb returns hard left/right. They all pile up. EQ'ing verb returns helps a ton too. Be carefull compressing them though. It's too easy to turn the reverb into mush this way.

Quote:
How do you make sure that the vocal parts that I fly around to other sections of the song line up correctly?
Make a note as to where in the song the vocal piece starts. A kick, or a snare hit, or a guitar part start or whatever.

Quote:
Is it ok to use AutoTune on the entire vocal track? How should I go about tuning tracks that need it without things getting out of hand?
If you want. It's best to piece the vocal track out and tune each phrase on a phrase by phrase/word by word basis in manual mode. Auto-tune has a bad habbit of not properly tracking each time it passes. On the contrary, I've stuck auto-tune on an insert before and left it on the track. Worked fine...even after a few prints. I was using it very very sparingly though.

Quote:
What is the best microphone to use on lead vocal?
What ever mic sounds best in that room, for that vocalist, on that day, at that temperature, for that song.

Quote:
I was told to record everything as loud as I could without going over, now during the mix I have to pull the fader way down to get the right level. The problem is that small moves make too big of a change in level and I can't get the balance right. Was I wrong to record so hot?
It's actually better to back off the converters a bit. Recording as loud as you can is a "use all the bits I can" myth. You get cleaner and more "ear friendly" recordings by backing off the converters a bit. Say -10db or so. Mixing "hot recordings" can be a pain, but if you need to use the "gain" plug-in to bring the level down a bit. That might help a ton.

Quote:
What is the difference in mix-buss resolution? Does it make any difference?
I don't know the exact mathmatical terms for this (Nika..Paging Nika), but it has something to do with how your DAW program calculates the "mix buss". A DAW uses calculations to blend all those tracks together. It's under some debate and scrutiny as to who does it best, or if there is even a difference. Some DAW's are 24 bit, some are 32 bit floating point. It's been discussed here and on PSW quite a lot I believe.

Quote:
What are the real differences between 16 bit, 24bit, and 32bit floating point?
See above. Bit depth refers to the computer having a reference point for the + and - waveform of the audio being sampled. The more bits you have, the more accurate it can be.

Quote:
How about the differences between 48kHz, 96kHz, 192kHz, DSD, DVD-A, and PDQ-Bach?
These are "sampling rates". Or how many times a second the converter takes a "picture" of the wave form being recorded. It will then place the waveform somewhere in the + or - range of the bit depth to calculate it's actual waveform.

Quote:
What should I mix to? Should I bounce-to-disk, mix to DAT tape, Masterlink, or analog tape?
I believe this is a personal preference. It can be argued that one is better than the other, but in the end I feel it's a tiny bit of a huge picture. Printint to tape can assist in getting a certain sound you are after, but digital formats are debatable. I'd advise printing the same mix to all available formats and deciding which works best for the project at hand. Don't forget to do a back-up

Quote:
If I send my mix to a mastering facility, what format should I send to them? If I want my mix loud should I make it loud, or should I let the mastering house do it? How is he going to know how much louder I want my mix if I don't do it before I send it?
Mix the song to sound like you want it to sound, then send it to the Mastering Engineer. Don't worry about "making it loud enough" or what he/she's going to do to it. The better you make the mix, the better they can master it, and the better the final product is. As for format, that depends on the Engineer and what they can handle. Any good Mastering Engineer should be able to handle any format you can supply. If they can't you should probably find a new Mastering Engineer.

Quote:
After my record is a hit should I buy a Farrari or Lamborghini? Is the flat-12 better than the V-12 engine?
I'm partial to Ferrari's, but the Gallardo is pretty nice. If I had a choice, and an Enzo or FXX was out of the question, I might get one of those new GT40's from Ford. It's faster and handles better/tighter than a 355 spider/360. Another option around the million $ range would be one of the Bugatti EB Veyron 16.4. It recently reached a land spead exceeing 248MPH (the 400KM/HR promised by Bugatti in 02).

Quote:
I heard the Pro Tools HD with version 6.1 software is certified for "known ice". Is that true? Where do they hide the de-ice boots?
What?
Old 12th August 2005
  #3
member no 666
 
Fletcher's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregg Sartiano
How do I get the ultimate drum sound on my record? Can I make a lousey recording of drums sound good in the mix? Can I make good sounding drums sound bad in the mix?
I can almost hear Roger's voice as he asks these questions... most likely he's asking Elliot Scheiner... [sorry... could pass up the opportunity]
Old 16th August 2005
  #4
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djui5's Avatar
 

Anyone else? I'd like to see some others points of view on this please.
Old 16th August 2005
  #5
Gear Nut
 
caseyLA's Avatar
 

Props to djui5 for answering EVERY SINGLE QUESTION.

You kick ass!
Old 16th August 2005
  #6
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opentune's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by caseyLA
Props to djui5 for answering EVERY SINGLE QUESTION.

You kick ass!
I agree! I also agree with diju5´s answer to the last question... heh
Old 18th August 2005
  #7
Lives for gear
 
Gregg Sartiano's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregg Sartiano
Does it help if I double-track all of the guitars? How about 12 tracks of guitars?

I record lots of percussion on my records, but I can never hear what I want in the mix. How do I keep the percussion from getting burried in the track?

How do I get a clear vocal sound and still keep it above the track? When I limit the whole track to make it louder the vocal gets burried.

I am stumped when it comes to panning. I usually just spread out all of the stereo tracks and put the solos in the center. Is this the right way to do it?

I keep doubling and trippling the background vocals, but I just can't get that big vocal feel I like.

I have added horns and strings to my kick-butt love ballad, but I just can't get that Lionel Richie killer mix that I was reaching for.
All of these issues -- watch low end & be ready to engage low cut filters. One cut is worth a thousand boosts.
Old 18th August 2005
  #8
That looks like a pretty decent course of study, as far as it goes.

With the exception of a bit of haziness on DVD-A, I can answer pretty much all those questions to my own satisfaction.


Does that mean I'm where I want to be, capability and knowledge-wise, as a recordist?

Nah...

But it's certainly a start.


Old 18th August 2005
  #9
Lives for gear
 
RKrizman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher
I can almost hear Roger's voice as he asks these questions... most likely he's asking Elliot Scheiner... [sorry... could pass up the opportunity]
That's even funnier than it is mean.

-R
Old 18th August 2005
  #10
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RKrizman
That's even funnier than it is mean.

-R

and even truer than it is funny.

Jeff
Old 18th August 2005
  #11
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Here's my answers, feel free to put them in any order you wish.

Yes.

No.

Absolutely!!!

It depends.
Old 19th August 2005
  #12
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Absolute's Avatar
 

Here's my answers to every question




What?
Old 20th August 2005
  #13
8070
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregg Sartiano
All of these issues -- watch low end & be ready to engage low cut filters. One cut is worth a thousand boosts.

I take this approach too...but it's important to know what your cutting...
and when not to cut low...but add low.
Old 21st August 2005
  #14
Gear Addict
 

RE: Mixing questions

responses in ALL CAPS BELOW (sorry - not used to this forum editor!)


How do I start my mix? Which instruments do I start working on first? I end up going around in circles, chasing my tail, if I had a tail!

FIRST OFF - I MIX IN ANALOG. HOW I BEGIN TOTALLY DEPENDS ON THE SONG. FROM A PURE LEVEL-MGMT PERSPECTIVE IT OFTEN MAKES SENSE TO LOAD UP THE 2BUS WITH THE DRUMS AND BASS FIRST. THIS WILL ALSO USUALLY MAKE IT MORE CONVENIENT TO GET THE FADER LEVELS IN A NICE SPOT. UNLESS I'M TRYING TO "FIX" PROBLEMS IN THE DRUMS AND BASS, I'LL HAVE THE VOCAL PLAYING THE WHOLE TIME. SSL'S HAVE A "SOLO IN FRONT" OPTION WHICH IS NICE FOR FOCUSING ON ITEMS WITHOUT KILLING EVERYTHING ELSE OFF, WHICH COMES IN HANDY TOO. I'D SAY YOU'RE LESS LIKELY TO CHASE YOUR TAIL IF YOU DO THE DRUMS FIRST AND LISTEN TO THE REST OF THE TRACK WHILE DIALING THEM IN. ONCE YOU GET A FEEL FOR HOW TO SETTLE IN THE FOUNDATION OF A SONG, YOU CAN START WITH THE VOX OR OTHER KEY INSTRUMENT. AND AGAIN, YOU'LL WANT TO LISTEN TO IT IN CONTEXT. IF YOU FIND YOURSELF CHASING YOUR TALE STOP SOLOING THINGS AND LISTEN CLOSELY TO HOW YOUR DRIVING THE 2BUS. IF YOU FIND YOURSELF PUSHING EVERYTHING UP MORE, YOU'RE PROBABLY MAKING A MESS.

How do I get the ultimate drum sound on my record? Can I make a lousey recording of drums sound good in the mix? Can I make good sounding drums sound bad in the mix?

OBVIOUSLY THE BEST DRUM SOUNDS START WITH THE RECORDING. BUT I'VE TRANSLATED SOME PRETTY MEDIOCRE DRUMS INTO THE "ULTIMATE" DRUMS FOR A PARTICULAR SONG MANY TIMES. IT HELPS TO HAVE A LOT OF NICE OUTBOARD FOR THIS SINCE A LOT OF BANDS I WORK WITH DON'T HAVE NEVE'S, PULTECS, ETC. TO TRACK WITH.

Should I always record the bass with a direct box, or should I mic the amp? How come I can never get the bass to sound the way I want in the mix?

ALWAYS? I WOULDN'T SAY ALWAYS, BUT MOST OF THE TIME IT COMES IN HANDY. SOMETIMES WORKING FAST YOU JUST DON'T HAVE TIME TO GET THE PERFECT BASS SOUND, SO YEAH, THE DI IS GREAT TO HAVE. IF I HAVE IT WHEN MIXING IT ALMOST ALWAYS GET USED IN SOME WAY. OTHER BASS TRICKS TO TRY INCLUDE SPLITTING THE BASS OFF INTO ANOTHER DUPLICATE THAT'S TIME-ALIGNED (EASY ON A CONSOLE). YOU CAN SQUISH THAT ONE WITH COMPRESSION AND FILTER THE VERY BOTTOM OUT FOCUSING ON THE PRESENCE IN THE MIX (OFTEN AROUND 600HZ). THEN YOU HAVE ANOTHER WAY TO BALANCE THE MIX THAT DOESN'T INVOLVE JACKING WITH HOW HARD YOU'RE HITTING THE 2 BUSS. OFTEN NICE TO SIDECHAIN THIS ONE WITH THE VOX AND ANY LEAD INSTRUMENTS.

Should I spread the piano hard left and right? Does it help if I use 4 or 5 mics on the piano? The studio said the piano was tuned a couple of weeks ago, it that good enough?

DEPENDS ON THE TUNE. PIANO CAN BE A BEAST TO GET TO SIT IN A BUSY TRACK. I DON'T CARE IF PEOPLE USE 2 OR 10 MICS ON A PIANO. I JUST USE WHAT I NEED TO MAKE THE PART WORK IN THE MIX (USUALLY BETWEEN 2 AND 4 MICS). BTW, ROOM MICS ON A PIANO ARE RARELY USEFUL IN A ROCK OR POP MIX.

Does it help if I double-track all of the guitars? How about 12 tracks of guitars?

AS FAR AS I'M CONCERNED THIS IS UP TO THE BAND. IF IT'S MY CHOICE I USE ONE MIC ON EACH CAB AND ONLY DOUBLE TRACK PARTS THAT NEED THAT SOUND. BUT SOME PEOPLE ARE VERY INTO THIS STUFF, SO I SIT BACK AND LET THEM DO WHAT THEY WANT (I'M NOT A PRODUCER). THEN I PICK AND CHOOSE IN THE MIX, THEY GENERALLY CAN'T TELL IF I DON'T USE ALL THE DOUBLES.

I record lots of percussion on my records, but I can never hear what I want in the mix. How do I keep the percussion from getting burried in the track?

OBVIOUSLY, THE WAY YOU USE REVERB AND DELAYS CAN AFFECT HOW THESE THINGS FIT INTO THE TRACK. FOR INSTANCE, I HATE IT WHEN PEOPLE BRING ME HAND CLAPS THAT ARE CLOSE-MIC'D IN A DEAD ROOM. FOR SOME INSTRUMENTS IT'S THE WAY THE SPACE REACTS TO THE SOUND THAT MATTERS. OBVIOUSLY COMPRESSION AND EQ ARE CRITICAL TO PLACING PERC IN A MIX AS WELL AS DECISIONS ABOUT HOW THEY RELATE TO THE OTHER TRACKS. PEOPLE HAVE A TENDENCY TO PUSH ALL THE FADERS UP AND UP AND UP. I WAS WORKING WITH NEW ORDER RECENTLY AND THEIR LIVE MIXER (WHO'S ALSO DONE THE SMITHS, JOY DIVISION, MORRISSEY) WAS IN THE CONTROL DURING TRACKING. SHE REALLY JUST WANTED TO KEEP TURNING EVERYTHING UP. IT JUST DOESN'T WORK THAT WAY.

How do I get a clear vocal sound and still keep it above the track? When I limit the whole track to make it louder the vocal gets burried.

AS WITH BASS, BLENDING A DUP OF THE VOCAL WITH MORE EXTREME COMPRESSION (1176 - ALL BUTTONS IN?!) CAN ACCOMPLISH THIS. BUT BE CAREFUL, IT CAN ALSO MAKE THE VOCAL JUMP OUT TOO MUCH AND EVEN SOUND "TOO CLEAN". SO I USE A SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT APPROACH FOR POP VS. ROCK.

I am stumped when it comes to panning. I usually just spread out all of the stereo tracks and put the solos in the center. Is this the right way to do it?

DEFINITELY NOT. SOME ARTISTS TURNED MIXERS LIKE THINGS TO BE VERY SYMETRICAL IN THE MIX AND THEY TAKE THE PANNING TOO LITERALLY. USE YOUR EARS. TRY STRANGE THINGS. DON'T ASSUME THAT IT WILL SOUND BEST WHEN THINGS ARE PANNED "LOGICALLY". CREATE GROUPS AND COUNTER BALANCES. PANNING IS CRITICAL TO CLARITY - NOT JUST THE IMAGE.

I keep doubling and trippling the background vocals, but I just can't get that big vocal feel I like.

THAT'S FINE. PEOPLE DO IT ALL THE TIME. I DONT' SEE A PROBLEM WITH IT.

I have added horns and strings to my kick-butt love ballad, but I just can't get that Lionel Richie killer mix that I was reaching for.

MAN, I DON'T KNOW WHERE TO START WITH THIS ONE. THE GUY WHO DID A LOT OF THOSE LIONEL RICHIE HITS IS A FRIEND. HE'S AMAZING - DEFINITELY GOT A SOUND. THERE'S NOT AN EASY ANSWER TO THIS ONE.

I record the tracks myself and then the producer sends the session out to someone else to overdub drums, or guitars, or horns. How do I know if I can get everything put back into my Pro Tools session properly?

HM. SEEMS UNRELATED TO MIXING SO I'LL PASS ON THAT ONE.

Should I use compressors on the stereo bus to make my mix louder? Do I need to make my mixes so loud?

I USE BUS COMPRESSION TO VARING DEGREES BECAUSE I'VE FOUND THAT PEOPLE RESPOND BETTER TO MY MIXES WHEN THEY'RE LOUDER. I DON'T MIX FOR AUDIOPHILES, I MIX FOR ARTISTS. SO IT DEPENDS ON THE ARTIST BUT MOST COMMON FOLK WILL FEEL THAT LOUDER IS BETTER. THERE'S ALSO A COOL TONE YOU CAN GET FROM BUS EQ AND COMPRESSION, BUT IT TAKES NICE GEAR AND EXPERIENCE NOT TO SCREW THINGS UP.

Are multi-band compressors any better than regular compressors?

DEPENDS ON THE TASK. IF YOU'RE GOING TO THROW A COMPRESSOR ON THE BUS, SOMETIMES A MULTIBAND IS MORE TRANSPARENT. BUT IF YOU KNOW HOW TO SIDECHAIN THE BUS COMPRESSOR YOU CAN GET THERE WITHOUT MULTIBAND. WHAT I LIKE ABOUT USING MULTIBAND IS THAT IT REALLY GLUES THINGS WELL AND DOES NOT ALTER THE SPECTRAL QUALITIES OF THE MIX AS MUCH AS EQ AND SINGLE-BAND COMPRESSORS CAN.

How come I have to use so many external reverb units and reverb plug-ins, and the reverb still doesn't sound right?

HM. I LIKE USING A LOT OF LAYERS OF EFFECTS SEPARATED BY CAREFULLY TUNED DELAYS. SEEMS LIKE A WEAK QUESTION - ALTHOUGH I DON'T DOUBT SOMEONE REALLY ASKED HIM THAT AT SOME POINT.

How do you make sure that the vocal parts that I fly around to other sections of the song line up correctly?

YOU CAN USE VOCALIGN. YOU CAN USE YOUR EARS AND FIND THE PERCUSSIVE ELEMENTS TO LINE UP. YOU CAN USE A SIDECHAINED COMPRESSOR TO DRIVE AN ENVELOP OVER THE WHOLE GROUP OF SUBMIXED VOX. THIS IS EASY IN PROTOOLS THOUGH...

I was told to record everything as loud as I could without going over, now during the mix I have to pull the fader way down to get the right level. The problem is that small moves make too big of a change in level and I can't get the balance right. Was I wrong to record so hot?

YOU CAN ALWAYS ADJUST THE LINE INPUT TRIM SO THAT YOU CAN GET THE FADERS IN THE SWEET SPOT AS LONG AS YOU SET THIS BEFORE INSERTING COMPRESSORS AND SUCH. SO RECORDING HOT SHOULDN'T BE A PROBLEM - EXCEPT - THAT MOST PEOPLE DO SOMETHING STUPID WITH COMPRESSION AND GAIN STAGING WHEN THEY ATTEMPT TO RECORD HOT. IRONICALLY, MOST PEOPLE DISTORT THE VOCALS WHEN PRINTING BEAUSE THEY'RE STAIRING AT THE SCREEN AND PRIORTIZE MAKING IT LOOK RIGHT OVER SOUNDING RIGHT. NEVE PREAMPS ARE GREAT, BUT IT IS POSSIBLE TO OVERDRIVE THEM -- AND THAT SOUNDS LIKE **** AND IS VERY HARD TO GET RID OF LATER. SAME GOES FOR MICROPHONES AND OTHER STAGES. WHEN IT COMES TO KEY ELEMENTS, DON'T ASSUME THAT BIGGER IS BETTER WHEN IT COMES TO THE WAVEFORM. MAKE SURE THAT EVERYTHING THE CHAIN IS DOING IS IMPROVING THE SOUND - NOT JUST MAKING A VISIBLE DIFFERENCE.
Old 29th October 2005
  #15
Deleted User
Guest
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
I heard the Pro Tools HD with version 6.1 software is certified for "known ice". Is that true? Where do they hide the de-ice boots?
What?
De-icing boots are found on some aircraft to remove the buildup of icing on the leading edges of the wings and the horizontal stabilizer, which can cause a loss of lift and—potentially—inability to move the control surfaces. The boots inflate a little and the ice cracks and flies off. Sorry—I'm studying for my private certificate.

Most pilots still prefer tube de-icing boots.
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