The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
"Real" Piano Lessons or YouTube Videos and Other Media... DAW Software
Old 2nd June 2009
  #1
Lives for gear
 
voicegenius's Avatar
 

"Real" Piano Lessons or YouTube Videos and Other Media...

I want to take piano lessons just so I can get better at what I don't know, which is nothing...

I can actually play, very well, by ear if you give me about 3 days on a song, but I want to be able to sit down and play anything on the spot. I have no clue to chord names, progressions, but I know what "sounds" right just cause I have a great ear... "honk, honk"

Yes, yes I know it takes years of practice and I'm willing to do that but, would you guys prefer a real teacher to, let say, Youtube video's, DVD instructionals, etc...? Seems like if I'm payin for lessons, I would commit to it as opposed to free...
Old 2nd June 2009
  #2
Lives for gear
 

do lessons nothing like specific instruction geared towards what you need. Plus being able to ask specific questions is huge. I took piano lessons for a year and it was great I feel like I learned enough where I can teach myself now.
Old 2nd June 2009
  #3
Lives for gear
 
voicegenius's Avatar
 

Yeah, it's like I know how to use Pro Tools, but with some instruction, I could be awesome...
Old 2nd June 2009
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Lessons, lessons, lessons....

If you're serious about getting good, you have to take real lessons. I took nearly 20 years of them and have studied with many classical, jazz, and pop players. I haven't taken them for a few years now and am thinking about restarting, just because it's hard to keep up the technique without someone occasionally looking over your shoulder.

I'm sure you have a good ear and you can learn a lot from videos. You can pick up elements of theory from textbooks. But piano is a tactile instrument. Everything is in the technique - how to work the instrument with your hands, "negotiating" with it to produce the sound you want. You just won't learn that stuff from video. Also don't underestimate the ability of a good teacher to help you build a curriculum.

Also, if I may say, your goal should not simply be to play things be ear. That usually just comes down to a good sense of chord structure and a solid sense of relative pitch. It's a great parlor trick, but a lot of people (including myself) can do it, and whether it takes them 30 second or 5 minutes to figure out a song, the trick is all the same. Great players are able to do so much more. Sight reading, composition, speed, feel.... it all comes with the lessons and the practice.

I have been studying for a long time, can play Gershwin and Chopin with as much proficiency as I play Billy Joel covers, and still feel that I'm learning every day. And I'd certainly never have the audacity to say I'm a great player. The more you know the less you know....

And for those pianists who are looking for something completely new, this book will keep you busy for hours on end....

Steinway & Sons: Jazz Piano The Left Hand (1 BOOK)

Adam
Old 2nd June 2009
  #5
Lives for gear
 
voicegenius's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by azirkin View Post
If you're serious about getting good, you have to take real lessons. I took nearly 20 years of them and have studied with many classical, jazz, and pop players. I haven't taken them for a few years now and am thinking about restarting, just because it's hard to keep up the technique without someone occasionally looking over your shoulder.

I'm sure you have a good ear and you can learn a lot from videos. You can pick up elements of theory from textbooks. But piano is a tactile instrument. Everything is in the technique - how to work the instrument with your hands, "negotiating" with it to produce the sound you want. You just won't learn that stuff from video. Also don't underestimate the ability of a good teacher to help you build a curriculum.

Also, if I may say, your goal should not simply be to play things be ear. That usually just comes down to a good sense of chord structure and a solid sense of relative pitch. It's a great parlor trick, but a lot of people (including myself) can do it, and whether it takes them 30 second or 5 minutes to figure out a song, the trick is all the same. Great players are able to do so much more. Sight reading, composition, speed, feel.... it all comes with the lessons and the practice.

I have been studying for a long time, can play Gershwin and Chopin with as much proficiency as I play Billy Joel covers, and still feel that I'm learning every day. And I'd certainly never have the audacity to say I'm a great player. The more you know the less you know....

And for those pianists who are looking for something completely new, this book will keep you busy for hours on end....

Steinway & Sons: Jazz Piano The Left Hand (1 BOOK)

Adam

thumbsup Good post... What should I look for in a teacher just so I'm not wasting my time? What are tips of a good teacher?
Old 2nd June 2009
  #6
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by voicegenius View Post
thumbsup Good post... What should I look for in a teacher just so I'm not wasting my time? What are tips of a good teacher?
Now that's a tough question. First, you're going to have to pick a style of play. Other than people who deal exclusively with beginners, most experienced teachers are going to be in the classical camp and you should welcome that. There is no substitute for learning the classical approaches to the piano. The relative rigidity of the style is good, in that it establishes "right" and "wrong" ways to play things (within reason) and demands solid development of technique.

And if you don't care for classical music (I'm being presumptuous here) then I can only assume you haven't heard enough of it. Perhaps you think Mozart is too pretty, Bach too playful, Beethoven too boomy (I'm generalizing, of course tutt). Then try the Russians: Rachmaninoff's preludes and third concerto, Prokofiev's second concerto in g minor, Shostakovich's second concerto in F major. And then take a long listen to Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue". When I could finally play that one (sometime during high school) it meant the world to me.

If you go straight to pop music (and just playing tunes by ear) you're going to find that you eventually hit a wall. And mark my words: you'll never impress anyone who knows a lick about what is really means to be a proficient pianist.

If you want to get into improvisation, you'll find that good technique means everything. Take it from a jazz pianist: nothing is more frustrating that dreaming up a wonderful motif in your head and not being able to execute it because your mind is more developed than your hands. Most experienced jazz players have extensive classical training, and at a minimum, technique that I believe is best developed through that training.

To be sure, there are a handful of professional players (some of whom are truly phenomenal) who have learned to play by ear. There are many well respected songwriters who don't know how to read music, and I know and enjoy much of their work. I just wouldn't model myself after them. If you go that route, your odds of getting good aren't, shall we say, good.

More specifically, look for a teacher who:

(1) is focussed on the style you want to learn
(2) understands technique
(3) will push you to study stuff even if you don't want to study it
(4) won't get pissed off the first time you show up to a lesson unprepared

Adam
Old 2nd June 2009
  #7
Gear Maniac
 
LimeMusic's Avatar
 

Lessons can be extremely helpful, but can also hold you back. When I was a teenager, I had a natural guitar talent, and moved pretty quickly through material, but my teacher insisted on moving at a slow pace. Many teachers (especially those who've been teaching for many years) just learn to move at a certain pace, and when someone comes along that can really absorb things quickly and has real talent (which it sounds like you might) they can actually hinder the student.

I would say that I agree with the points azirkin posted, but I'd add that if you get into it and feel like you can move along faster than the instructor is willing to go, assuming you are KILLING every exercise and lesson they give you, then be willing to find another...

But yeah, I've got a Bachelor's in Music with concentration in Classical and Jazz guitar, and most of the stuff on YouTube is nothing in comparison to personal instruction with a teacher that is tuned in to what you want to accomplish...
Old 6th June 2009
  #8
Lives for gear
 
voicegenius's Avatar
 

bump... just want more feedback
Top Mentioned Products
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
MIDIchlorian / Rap + Hip Hop Engineering and Production
0
quietdrive / The Moan Zone
50
u b k / So Much Gear, So Little Time
89

Forum Jump
Forum Jump