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I miss the 80's
Old 8th August 2005
  #61
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greggybud's Avatar
It would seem to me 80s music is relativley an easy decade to describe. Early 80s you had punk/new-wave stuff and hits that reflected this style such as Blondie, Kim Carnes, Olivia Newton Johns Physical, Human league, even Barry Manilow did a "punk" flavor called "No Freind of Mine" As the decade progressed more and bigger hair bands, plus Euro-pop artists (Talk Talk, Flock of Seaguls, Untravox, Culture Club, Bananarama)

Okay now for the 90s things become a lot more blurry. In the early 90s CHR (Top-40) music format was dying due to fragmentation between music styles. On CHR stations you somehow had to figure out a way to integrate Nirvana (grunge) mainstream pop songs, and Rap. Meanwhile country formats became huge including country cross-overs. So how does one define the 90s or what songs are 90s hits that will be remembered? Would it be Alanis Moresettes simple gritty back-to-the-basics including that strung-out-on-heroine straight greasy hair parted down the middle look? Madonna continued to do well, but I still think of her as an 80s artist.

The 90s seems to be the decade of defragmenation among radio formats. But when you think of 90s artsts.....what names do you associate with the 90s? To me, its much harder to do than the 80s artists.
Old 8th August 2005
  #62
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paultools's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor


Just don't forget your skinny ties or Bolo ties or sock ties(for the conservative crowd),fatigues,Cazals,Adidas shell tops,espadrilles(without socks of course),pony tails, and make up(really Eye liner and lipstick).

Who still misses the 80's?
BLAHHHHHHHH!!!
I said the audio production was great....! The culture was another story.
Dig up a old Liggett/Barbosa production and tell me what's hittin' like that today!
Old 8th August 2005
  #63
Lives for gear
 

From the '90s I associate (rock) with bands like:

Nirvanna, Pearl Jam, Sound Garden, Metallica, Chili Peppers, Janes Addiction, & Alice In Chains - the list goes on.

In fairness to the '80s I think that bands didn't know exactly what to do with all the new tech coming out and the experimentation got stuck with the sounds without too much thought of integration.

Same thing happened with guitar hero's. Technique peaked in the '80s with technique (rock genre) and got hung up on that. Although, I feel the EVH was the best at integrating flash with taste. Then comes SRV who said soul is just as improtant and influenced a whole generation of players.

The nice thing about the 90's is that it busted up the virutoso myth of the '80s and reminded everyone that rock is about energy and passion. I think now we'll see a tastefull blend of both - hopefully soon heh
Old 8th August 2005
  #64
Quote:
Originally Posted by u b i k
I INVENTED THE PIANO KEY NECKTIE!


gregoire
del ubik

And i brought the Samurai pony tail into fashion....

Really.
Old 8th August 2005
  #65
Gear Addict
 
mxeryus's Avatar
 

OK, back to music now (just be glad you did *NOT* invent the Piano Monster Tie...). The only bands from the 90's that I find interesting are Radiohead and Manic Street Preachers (althought their roots are in the 80's). Sorry...
I just remember OMD spending 9 months at Wisseloord studio's. Can you imagine ?
Old 8th August 2005
  #66
Quote:
Originally Posted by mxeryus
Sorry...
I just remember OMD spending 9 months at Wisseloord studio's. Can you imagine ?

And it turns out that their biggest hit"If you leave"from the Pretty in Pink soundtrack was mixed and remixed by TLA at Unique Studios.


Hey there is something 80's for you John Hughes movies.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000455/

Anyone for The Breakfast Club(who could ever forget the Simple Minds song).
Old 8th August 2005
  #67
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De chromium cob's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
Anyone for The Breakfast Club
The principle started the whole 'devil sign craze'.... Another thing that reminds me of the 80s....
Old 8th August 2005
  #68
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dave-G's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
Its Kajagoogoo

http://www.kajagoogoo.com/history.shtml

And "Too shy" still sounds good.

I play it every morning on the SSL when i first hit the studio. heh
Every morning, huh? THE HORROR!!!!

I searched and searched, thinking some assistant must have shot some video of your morning Kajagoogoo ritual, and sure enough, i finally managed to find some hidden-camera footage:

So, here's Thrill in front of the SSL (shot yesterday morning, from what I'm told) ... doing his usual "Too Shy-Shy" warm-up.



Strange that you were wearing that SpiderMan suit, but hey... If that's how you've gotta mix, that's how you've gotta mix.
-dave
Old 8th August 2005
  #69
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave-G
Strange that you were wearing that SpiderMan suit, but hey... If that's how you've gotta mix, that's how you've gotta mix.
-dave

That must have been Monday.

Its Aquaman on tuesdays.

Pointed ears and a speedo.

What a sight to behold. heh


What's the Chris Rock joke about Aquaman again?
Old 8th August 2005
  #70
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave-G
Every morning, huh? THE HORROR!!!!


-dave
Come on Dave i am not the only one.

I know you got some hidden 80's rituals...

Are you the Top Gun guy?(Jacket and everything)

or


The Indiana Jones guy with the hat?


or



Are you Robert Downey's as Julian Wells or Andrew Mcarthy's Clay Easton in Less Than Zero?


or I got it...



Did a little search on you this morning...


Discovered you were chatting over at:


http://users.aol.com/venkie/rgb/rgb.htm


Dave we know...


I ain't afraid of no ghosts!
Old 8th August 2005
  #71
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sleepwalker's Avatar
 

God. With a few exceptions. I hate 80's production.
Old 8th August 2005
  #72
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dave-G's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
Come on Dave i am not the only one.

I know you got some hidden 80's rituals...
No.

I really tried my damndest to just tune-out on mainstream culture and let the 80's pass above my radar.

The only thing close to an 80s "ritual" I have might be the fact that I cringe deeply at most of the pop-culture artifacts and recordings of the decade.

And... although I'm pretty sure you and I are the same age, I feel much more imprinted by the sounds of the 70s (for better or worse) than the 80s. Give me "Sara Smile" or Bill Withers' "Use Me" or James Gang's "Funk 49" for my morning ritual, and you can have all the Kajagoogoo, Scritti Politti, Aldo Nova, Falco and Bourgeois Tagg you want.

Of course, I'll be wearing the Hong Kong Phooey outfit, since you seem to have booked up all the "Super Friends" at the costume rental shop.



-dave

ps: just how did you find that Ghostbusters site so easliy? heh
Old 8th August 2005
  #73
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What scares me is that despite how shallow, superficial, untalented, corporate, and sellout the music of the 80s was, todays commerical music pales in comparison. I am in fear of the next decade. Perhaps it will be banging rocks together and making grunts, then we can start the cycle of music all over again.
Old 8th August 2005
  #74
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I think todays music is much better....just not making top 40 FM radio. Bands sell 20K copies and do well. The audience is there, it's just you can't be lazy to find the music.
Old 22nd June 2014
  #75
Here for the gear
 

As a product of the late 70's early 80's (I graduated in '83) I found it really interesting that a lot of the bands talked about here in this thread were really mid 70's bands that started seeing a lot of success with their careers around '78-79 after already putting out at least three albums. I can say that from a solely production stand point a lot of really great engineered records came out in the late 70's early 80's. I feel there is a lot of subjectivity as to who was writing great music as opposed to who had a great sounding record.

Not everyone likes Tom Petty, (why I don't know, dude is the ****!) but if you go back and listen to "Damn the Torpedo's" you will hear what I'm talking about. That record changed a whole industry on how to record drums. Jimmy Iovine was pretty dang brilliant with that production. There's a lot of footage to see documentary wise now on the time period of production leading up to the 80's that will really help one understand the industry progression. Peter Bogdonavich's doc on Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, the one about Tom Doud. Hell even the doc about David Geffen is important, even "Sound City." I'm not the hugest Grol fan but enjoyed a lot of that documenary. Especially when they played parts of tracks from Nicks Buckingham, Fleetwood Mac to Ratt and Dio. The common thread was the drums on all of those records. Even the hair metal bands were getting great sounds back then. The first two major label Ratt records sounded amazing! Two inch tape. Even Mötley Crüe's first record "Shout at the Devil" sounds great when the guitar breaks in on the first song. Sabbath's "Heaven and Hell," Ozzy's first two records. Then on the "Sound City" doc they play that digital "whitesnake" record with the overgated and all triggered drum tracks. Sounds big but sounds sterile. No life. Hell even live all the drums were triggered. Lifeless.

Some of the best sounding records sonically are the 50's and 60's period of Atlantic Records. Go back and listen to Ray Charles. His recordings from 58-62 are insane! Amazing sounds.

Yeah, I miss the 80's. so did the guy's from the 50's in the 70's and so on. We're just getting older.

My youngest son who is 21 plays power pop punk. Loves Elvis Costello, Clash, The Who, vinyl, and 2" tape. He's in love with Analog. Hates recording all digital. There's hope.

I keep moving backwards. I play old R&B and Blues now living in Austin. I'm obsessed with old recording techniques and making records that have that vibe. I've used a mix of analog to digital. Recording on 2" and mixing in pro tools. Now I prefer a console, tape, and going to digital at the very end taking the 2 track to the mastering house and having it dumped over there during mastering. Even then were using old tube compressors in the mastering process. I'm lucky to have a mastering studio, Terra Nova, right down the street that does it the old way even in digital. Hours sitting in the room listening to every last inch while mastering. Tweaking the crap out of it.

Most of those great 80's records were done on analog. Digital had just shown up and very few were convinced.

Peace.
Old 22nd June 2014
  #76
Here for the gear
 

As a product of the late 70's early 80's (I graduated in '83) I found it really interesting that a lot of the bands talked about here in this thread were really mid 70's bands that started seeing a lot of success with their careers around '78-79 after already putting out at least three albums. I can say that from a solely production stand point a lot of really great engineered records came out in the late 70's early 80's. I feel there is a lot of subjectivity as to who was writing great music as opposed to who had a great sounding record.

Not everyone likes Tom Petty, (why I don't know, dude is the ****!) but if you go back and listen to "Damn the Torpedo's" you will hear what I'm talking about. That record changed a whole industry on how to record drums. Jimmy Iovine was pretty dang brilliant with that production. There's a lot of footage to see documentary wise now on the time period of production leading up to the 80's that will really help one understand the industry progression. Peter Bogdonavich's doc on Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, the one about Tom Doud. Hell even the doc about David Geffen is important, even "Sound City." I'm not the hugest Grol fan but enjoyed a lot of that documenary. Especially when they played parts of tracks from Nicks Buckingham, Fleetwood Mac to Ratt and Dio. The common thread was the drums on all of those records. Even the hair metal bands were getting great sounds back then. The first two major label Ratt records sounded amazing! Two inch tape. Even Mötley Crüe's first record "Shout at the Devil" sounds great when the guitar breaks in on the first song. Sabbath's "Heaven and Hell," Ozzy's first two records. Then on the "Sound City" doc they play that digital "whitesnake" record with the overgated and all triggered drum tracks. Sounds big but sounds sterile. No life. Hell even live all the drums were triggered. Lifeless.

Some of the best sounding records sonically are the 50's and 60's period of Atlantic Records. Go back and listen to Ray Charles. His recordings from 58-62 are insane! Amazing sounds.

Yeah, I miss the 80's. so did the guy's from the 50's in the 70's and so on. We're just getting older.

My youngest son who is 21 plays power pop punk. Loves Elvis Costello, Clash, The Who, vinyl, and 2" tape. He's in love with Analog. Hates recording all digital. There's hope.

I keep moving backwards. I play old R&B and Blues now living in Austin. I'm obsessed with old recording techniques and making records that have that vibe. I've used a mix of analog to digital. Recording on 2" and mixing in pro tools. Now I prefer a console, tape, and going to digital at the very end taking the 2 track to the mastering house and having it dumped over there during mastering. Even then were using old tube compressors in the mastering process. I'm lucky to have a mastering studio, Terra Nova, right down the street that does it the old way even in digital. Hours sitting in the room listening to every last inch while mastering. Tweaking the crap out of it.

Most of those great 80's records were done on analog. Digital had just shown up and very few were convinced.

Peace.
Old 22nd June 2014
  #77
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kats View Post
I think todays music is much better....just not making top 40 FM radio. Bands sell 20K copies and do well. The audience is there, it's just you can't be lazy to find the music.
Everybody that tells me this who actually backs it up by providing some links to this "fantastic music that is all around us but for our laziness in seeking it out" invariably links to some band that is a complete derivative re-hash of an earlier era, be it 80s new wave or post-punk or 50s rockabilly or 70s prog or glam rock or 90s "alternative."

I invite you to prove me wrong by posting something that isn't.

I personally think rock is done. I think it's gone everywhere it can go and done everything it can do. That or our culture just doesn't support it any more. Either way, I don't think we're coming back from the precipice.
Old 22nd June 2014
  #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnyclueless View Post
What scares me is that despite how shallow, superficial, untalented, corporate, and sellout the music of the 80s was, todays commerical music pales in comparison. I am in fear of the next decade. Perhaps it will be banging rocks together and making grunts, then we can start the cycle of music all over again.
I hope you're right about grunting and banging. What I'm afraid of is that we will continue on the trajectory we're on until every classic rock band finally (literally) dies off and the only sounds being made at all will be the likes of Ke$ha or Katie Perry, which will never go away.
Old 22nd June 2014
  #79
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lovekrafty's Avatar
 

Screw the 80,s give me back the 90,s
Some truly great music was made, without the pretentious cheese.

I was in several hardcore NWOBM thrash bands in the 80,s
This was before it was more main steam,got tired
Of being hassled by trendies that listened to Rick Astley etc.

Even the metal scene got screwed up by cockrock bands
Trying to be sunset strip posers with their Tina Turner wigs.

That's my rant.
Old 22nd June 2014
  #80
Gear Maniac
 
Gbar's Avatar
 

If you remember the 1980s clearly, you weren't doing what I was doing
Old 22nd June 2014
  #81
Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor View Post
Blue1 lets get it right.

Its Kajagoogoo

http://www.kajagoogoo.com/history.shtml

And "Too shy" still sounds good.

I play it every morning on the SSL when i first hit the studio. heh
heh

Missed this the first time around.


I had a soft spot for it, despite myself.
Old 22nd June 2014
  #82
Wrong the '70s were best.
BTW, this thread is 9 years old ... Surely the next wave of nostalgia freaks have come along by now and bemoaning the glory days of the '90s.
Old 22nd June 2014
  #83
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovekrafty View Post
Screw the 80,s give me back the 90,s
Some truly great music was made, without the pretentious cheese.

[...]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pichi View Post
Wrong the '70s were best.
BTW, this thread is 9 years old ... Surely the next wave of nostalgia freaks have come along by now and bemoaning the glory days of the '90s.
You were 'pre-anticipated' by a little under two hours...
Old 23rd June 2014
  #84
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cavern's Avatar
 

Duran Duran,they had it all.The hair,the cloth,the 80's vocal whine.
I miss my Crumar synth and my SH-101.
Ahhh the days when vintage drums were cheap.
Old 23rd June 2014
  #85
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cavern's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gbar View Post
If you remember the 1980s clearly, you weren't doing what I was doing
I remember doing that.
Old 23rd June 2014
  #86
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by drpeacock View Post
I personally think rock is done. I think it's gone everywhere it can go and done everything it can do. That or our culture just doesn't support it any more. Either way, I don't think we're coming back from the precipice.
Nah,
It's just that Rock has evolved into something that maybe doesn't fit into your idea of what it should be. There are plenty of bands that still claim to be "Rock" and have "Rock" influences. Rock seems to change/evolve every decade. 50's, 60's, 70's, 80's, 90's, 2k's, all have there own flavor of Rock music.
Old 23rd June 2014
  #87
Fun thread!
To my ears, audio engineering hit it's peak in the late 70's(DSOTM etc)...while audio production hit a peak in the early 80's, based purely on the balance of old school analog & new digital technology with gobs of experimentation with writing, arranging & mixing.

By the mid 80's however, things were getting pretty homogenized really quick. The grunge movement was necessary, and there was actually a lot of production carried over from the previous decade that gave a nice sense of depth to these "bare bones" groups. If it's been years since you've heard Nevermind or Ten, and especially if you've never given them a close inspection, they bear testament to this.

As grunge settled down, the 90's progressed very nicely until the 2000s when things got homogenized again...this time for good in the pop scene. Fortunately, with the changes in the industry and culture due to technology, there is lots of great material(even in rock) being produced; just not to Power Windows or Seven and the Ragged Tiger level.
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