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What about R&B?
Old 7th August 2005
  #61
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Quote:
What are some of the building blocks of a good R&B song
the song - get your guide down and build the beat round it cos in rnb the rule is, the beat works with the rythm & sylabic rhythm of the vocal



Quote:
So R&B is out there to an extent, but you can kiss goodbye the days of the Manhattans, the Temps, Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell, Al Green.
none of that was RnB music back in the day, i never heard anyone call that RnB at the time it was out... I mean Marvin had 2 big club hits to my mind, Got to Give it up Pt 1&2 - and - heard it thru the grapevine - neither is RnB music

mind you, I aint that old to remember clubbing any further back so, lol, but when I think Marvin gaye i think of those 2 tracks in clubs



anyways man original RnB was like 40 years ago! you dont expect music to stay the same do you?

anyways, RnB was already finished when those people were peaking as an original new commercial movement longtime cos it was a 60's thing (what we traditionaly call RnB) surely?

as far as i understand it about the term RnB as a brit, in the old days they had a 'Black' chart cos USA was still into aparthied, called 'The RnB chart' for 'black' music.... is that right? is it true? and that chart was seperate from the mainstream chart??... anyways i understood that, and it kept that name long after the original RnB style had passed as a new/current style thing.

I always understood that even in the 70's micheal jackson added rock guitar from van halen so his record would be accepted in the mainstream FM US 'white' chart, perhaps that's a myth?

perhaps some americans know the truth of it?... but I heard that wether it's true or not

RnB in the old days was rnb, tradtitional 60's rnb, but RnB now is RHYMES & BEATS... innit?

found this on the www:




Quote:
Rhythm and blues (or R&B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. It replaced the term race music, which was deemed offensive, and was initially used to identify the style of music that later developed into rock and roll.

By the 1970s, rhythm and blues was being used as a blanket term to describe soul and funk as well. . Today, R&B, no longer an initialism, defines the modern version of the soul and funk influenced African-American pop music that originated with the demise of disco in 1980.
I like RnB if it's not pop cheeze. I spose Usher and the likes are 'RnB' now, although personaly i'd mebbe call it Nu soul... oh well, genres-smenres, they are so confusing at times lol
Old 7th August 2005
  #62
Gear Nut
 
gamrecords's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 7161
the song - get your guide down and build the beat round it cos in rnb the rule is, the beat works with the rythm & sylabic rhythm of the vocal





none of that was RnB music back in the day, i never heard anyone call that RnB at the time it was out... I mean Marvin had 2 big club hits to my mind, Got to Give it up Pt 1&2 - and - heard it thru the grapevine - neither is RnB music

mind you, I aint that old to remember clubbing any further back so, lol, but when I think Marvin gaye i think of those 2 tracks in clubs



anyways man original RnB was like 40 years ago! you dont expect music to stay the same do you?

anyways, RnB was already finished when those people were peaking as an original new commercial movement longtime cos it was a 60's thing (what we traditionaly call RnB) surely?

as far as i understand it about the term RnB as a brit, in the old days they had a 'Black' chart cos USA was still into aparthied, called 'The RnB chart' for 'black' music.... is that right? is it true? and that chart was seperate from the mainstream chart??... anyways i understood that, and it kept that name long after the original RnB style had passed as a new/current style thing.

I always understood that even in the 70's micheal jackson added rock guitar from van halen so his record would be accepted in the mainstream FM US 'white' chart, perhaps that's a myth?

perhaps some americans know the truth of it?... but I heard that wether it's true or not

RnB in the old days was rnb, tradtitional 60's rnb, but RnB now is RHYMES & BEATS... innit?

found this on the www:






I like RnB if it's not pop cheeze. I spose Usher and the likes are 'RnB' now, although personaly i'd mebbe call it Nu soul... oh well, genres-smenres, they are so confusing at times lol
na,.... you didn't just say that Marvin only had 2 hits did ya?
come on now, get your history right before you bring it here. I think "What's Going On" was a hit and a little song called "Let's get it on" also did ok. There was a few more that i'll let you discover. :-)

michael
Old 7th August 2005
  #63
Quote:
Originally Posted by paultools
I never bought his albums, but based upon the singles, I like what he does. He knows his history and understands the lineage. His tribute to the Isleys (Lifetime) is a good example. That classic sweet guitar phase shifter...
He did a cameo on Sweetback's first album, and for those of you that like grooves, check that album out! It's Sade's band sans Sade. A little experimental, yet very enjoyable.

You got me thinking about Terrence Trent D'Arby, who I thought was a tremendous talent. I think "Sign Your Name" is a classic. I heard a story that he somehow offended the powers that be at his label (Sony?) and they basically destroyed him.

Another belief of mine is that many of the true classic songs of R&B were written on the guitar, and when keyboardists kinda started to take over, things shifted a bit. Take the Al Green classics, the Isleys, Rufus... well Stevie Wonder certainly wrote his share of classics, so there goes my theory, but any of you feel what I'm sayin?
I totally agree.

Like you said before it comes from the church where the best musicians play.

I am currently producing a young R&B group for the next generation.

Its a cross between Sly & The Family Stone and Prince.

The rhythm section is all young gospel musicians from the church(average age around 18).

But the group is built around rock/funk electric/acoustic guitar(the oldest member).


There are 2 female vocalists(black and white), one male vocalist(black) and one female background singer/keyboardists(asian).

I've gotten tons of interests from the labels(especially Def jam), but i may do this one on my own.

I feel the labels will destroy the bands essence(they are already suggesting doing cameos with existsing rap acts).
Old 7th August 2005
  #64
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Jamz's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by paultools
I don't know... I think now that producers are more in the spotlight, but there was a "branding" of certain producers and their associated "sound" even back in the day.
With Teddy and the O'Jays, of course it's Gamble & Huff, Marvin=Motown, Aretha= Arif/Purdie/Richard T, Al Green, Otis, Carla Thomas = Memphis.
Along came Kashif who produced Howard Johnson, George Benson, and turned Evelyn King into a superstar; an ABSOLUTE MASTER named Leon Sylvers III who wrote for and produced Shalamar, The Whispers and the Deele from whence came Babyface... Jam and Lewis; there was a guy named Nick Martinelli who was pretty good as well heh who had a certain identifiable sound.
I think R&B music has always been producer-driven, but the missing element now is the SONG.
Agreed. However, my point is that these artists had very distinct sounds that allowed them to stand on their own. Absolutely there were great producers and writers. But today it often appears that emphasis is on the producer and the artist just happens to be on their tracks.i.e Puffy, Jermaine, Missy etc.
When an Aretha song came on the radio it was (and still is) Aretha. Nobody immediately discussed Arif's "tracks". I also don't recall Arif getting his own record label and becoming an artist which is also a trend that many of today's producers enjoy. There was greater artist identity and of course great songs and producers.

In the early 90s I noticed a change at labels. Labels stopped caring as much about artist development. I met Jermaine Dupree while working on the first Kriss Kross album. He was a kid. That CD sold 11 million copies. When it blew up what happened? Sony immediately offered Jermaine a label (So So Def). Jermaine has been very successful in his career. Where are the 2 kids that he discovered in a mall that never rapped before?
At the same time I also worked with Gerald Levert/Levert. Their records consistenly sold Gold but never platinum. Gerald is an amzing singer. Also a very competent producer/writer. How many years would it take for him to sell 11 million! If the label has a choice of which road to follow when signing a new artist where do you think the A&R man is going to run? 1 CD, 1 marketing and promotion campaign = 11 million in sales as opposed to many many years, album launches and marketing money to develop an artist to that number. Jermaine and the likes become magic. He took 2 kids with no previous experience and sold a ton of CDs. Nothing wrong with wanting to sell CDs except the key element then shifted away from finding and developing great talent and then matching them with great songs and producers (a la Nick Martinelli heh). Just send whatever new artist we find to the 4 or 5 most popular beat makers at radio and they'll sell. Hopefully, something of substance will emerge.

I totally agree about the song element. Lauryn Hill was mentioned in this thread.
I happen to really like the Fugees and think Lauryn and Wyclef are very talented people. However, when The Score blew up and sold 15 million what was the song that propelled that album? "Killing Me Softly". A timeless song.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paultools
The sad truth is that there are now two generations of an audience that was raised on music that had little to do with the music we so fondly remember. Decision-makers at labels are of this generation, and have little if any appreciation for a well-crafted R&B production. It is now the music that your parents and in some cases Grandparents listened to... it's not cool or relavent anymore to the audience that the music industry thrives on.
Sad but true. However, while the style of music changes I don't believe we necessarilly have to lose sight of great talent regardless of generation. I've seen enough Hoola Hoops.

Well I just watched the latest Pepsi commercial with Arif in it which reminds me I must pick up an Arif baseball jersey today. Great clothing line.
Old 7th August 2005
  #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
I feel the labels will destroy the bands essence(they are already suggesting doing cameos with existsing rap acts) .
Old 7th August 2005
  #66
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinc
I hear what your saying.

...

I can`t even listen to Otis Redding around friends because I`ll start crying like a little girl. At least internally. How`d they do that anyways ? A lot of of old Reggae records do the same thing to me. It still amazes me how they could capture so much sorrow and emotion onto tape.

...

That's why I come to this place...

Curtis Mayfield can do that to me.

It doesn't hurt that one of the peak musical experiences of my life was seeing CM at his last show, the day before his accident. Stupidly enough, I'd been recording all afternoon and was late to the free, oudoor show, so I only caught the last two songs and the encore... but that went on for maybe 40 or 50 minutes. The whole, small, wildly crowded urban amphitheatre was utterly tranported as he and the band did an incredibly spirited, incredibly moving Move On Up that seemed to just ramp higher and higher.

A few years later, that song came on and I stopped what I was doing and listened and remembered and before I knew it I was swaying and bumping in my office chair, pumping my fists in the air like some fool -- and tears were absolutely streaming down my face.

That's soul music.
Old 7th August 2005
  #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz

Well I just watched the latest Pepsi commercial with Arif in it which reminds me I must pick up an Arif baseball jersey today. Great clothing line.
ABSOLUTELY CLASSIC!!!!!!

Most of those "label deals' given to young producers (Jermaine) were essentially glorified "production deals" with an imprint. The producers could not own their masters, everything was cross-collateralized, and were like 13-16 point deals. Basically vanity labels to stoke the ego of the producer and keep in somewhat in-house. Big Suge had a better situation, then Master P comes along with the blueprint and legend that launced a million "labels" (chime in anytime, No SSL).

Arif did have a situation with Atlantic, and of couse there was TSOP... you're making me think here... I guess a producer was responsible for most if not all of an entire album, and I favor that approach.
Old 7th August 2005
  #68
no ssl yet
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Shannon Sanders

Do any of you guys have Shannon Sanders' album (I think thats his name). He's a southern cat that plays keyboards. I think I saw him playing for India Arie at the Shade tour. Man the cat never got picked up by a major (that I know of) and I lost my copy of his demo/album. Some cool **** that I wouldnt mind having again

I think it's all about intelligence and good witty song writing. IT"s no different in RnB from rap right now. 2Pac made songs like Brenda's got a baby, and Dear mama in addition to his Gangsta party type songs. Music should be about a balance. Hell sometimes life is up, sometimes it's down. Todays music is too cookie cutter for emotion and that is the problem.

I listened to early NWA 2 nights ago. I'm talking 100miles and running, Appetite for destruction etc... Cool songs. But today you get none of that, everybody is "IN DA club"

Lauryn Hill touched on normal emotions with good songs and that's why her music is timeless. From now till the end of time people will be able to sing D'Angelo's "Your my Ladyyyy such a beautiful ladyyy. I can tell their looking at us"

Good song writing for me makes the listener notice a part of life that has always been there but you never took time to notice. kinda like if theirs a crack in the ground outside of your doorstep. A good song will bring it to your attention though you walk over it without noticing it EVERYDAY. (I dont know if this makes my point butI'm hoping u all understand)..

I think its about speaking artistically and few actually do that. Man, Reuben and Fantasia are cool but they are no Luther and Aretha or Patti. Damn sure no Marvin and Tammi or Sam Cooke

But hell where are the Gearslut collaborations. We encompass opinionated (hopefully talented ) folk from all over. We all have the gear/knowledge. WHERE are our good songs, good music etc.... THE difference always starts with self. IMO Surely some of us no good singers/musicians/people. Hook em up. Send some protools files around. INSPIRE!!! Do Something, OR stop bitchin about it not being done


This is not just a fan forum, most of us are in the trenches daily. If you want it changed, CHANGE IT
Old 8th August 2005
  #69
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kevinc's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1
That's why I come to this place...

Curtis Mayfield can do that to me.

It doesn't hurt that one of the peak musical experiences of my life was seeing CM at his last show, the day before his accident. Stupidly enough, I'd been recording all afternoon and was late to the free, oudoor show, so I only caught the last two songs and the encore... but that went on for maybe 40 or 50 minutes. The whole, small, wildly crowded urban amphitheatre was utterly tranported as he and the band did an incredibly spirited, incredibly moving Move On Up that seemed to just ramp higher and higher.

A few years later, that song came on and I stopped what I was doing and listened and remembered and before I knew it I was swaying and bumping in my office chair, pumping my fists in the air like some fool -- and tears were absolutely streaming down my face.

That's soul music.

Yeah Curtis was brilliant wasn`t he. Such a unique vocal style for a lead and like you say you could really feel the guys pain when he sung. Amazing arrangements on his tunes as well.

The only album I have of his is an extended version of the Superfly soundtrack which seems to have about 5 - 10 songs from other albums on it. Great but I need more !

Just another artist that I`m way behind in going out and buying all their albums. All the ones I`ve seen in the store seem to be best of`s or renditions of Superfly so it`s hard to figure out what to get.

Any suggestions ?

I assume the Impressions stuff is worth looking into as well. People get readys a great tune.
Old 8th August 2005
  #70
That's a tough one. I was just reviewing the albums on Music Match On Demand, my subscription service, and, like a lot of now classic artists, there are a lot of damn hit packages. And a lot of them have a lot of great stuff and some of them have some stuff that I don't find quite as vital; there are a few tracks in Mayfield's career I just don't like. (Imagine... not like anyone else, huh? heh )

And then a lot of the albums that were originally pretty short LPs have a bunch of extra tracks, outtakes, etc. Which is cool, unless you like to just pop an album on and not have to program around 3 slightly different versions of the same song.

And, I have to admit it, I'm not as familiar with certain parts of Mayfield's career as others. I'm doing the online equivalent of dropping the needle and there's a real range of stuff.

If it was me, I think I'd consider one of the larger collections. Some of them have more stuff from the Impressions, while some of it is restricted to his solo stuff. (And then there are some glossy duets and things... some of those among the ones I find problematic.)

I came to Mayfield late, myself, at least as a buyer. Back in the 70s, you couldn't escape the Superfly soundtrack, although I always figured I'd have to buy it if they ever stopped playing it.

When I went looking for it, quite some time ago, it wasn't even available on CD (boy, that's changed) and I ended up with an early GHits package that had more than a few of his great ones, including a small handful from S-Fly but also at least one have-to-skip ballad/duet.

If it sounds like I'm hedging, hemming, and hawing, here, you're right.

I'll say this... I think my favorite period for him is the early 70s, where his wah style has come into its own and there's often an undercurrent of nocturnal, if not outright menacing, funk.

Then again, one of my favorites is now the utterly optimistic, uplifting, joyful Move on Up... so, you know. It's hard to say...



_________________________

PS... speaking of the SF soundtrack... despite the imprecations of my pals, I never went to see Superfly back then. When I heard the word "blaxploitation" -- mostly what I heard was 'xploitation... And the first time or two I heard the theme song, I tried not to like it.

But then I heard Freddy's Dead and Pusherman and I thought, wow... that's pretty cool, he's like doing a greek chorus thing (in ancient greek drama, there would be a chorus of actors on stage who would comment on the action -- can't remember if they actually sang or not... I pretty much drew the line at Shakespeare and Moliere. Spike Lee uses a similar device in Do the Right Thing, with, I think, a trio of characters who pop up everywhere, commenting on what's going on.

Anyhow... once I caught hold of Mayfield's moral depth in approaching the material, I was really impressed. And, of course, I could let myself really sink into that dark, sinister, and very funky music.
Old 9th August 2005
  #71
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kevinc's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1
That's a tough one. I was just reviewing the albums on Music Match On Demand, my subscription service, and, like a lot of now classic artists, there are a lot of damn hit packages. And a lot of them have a lot of great stuff and some of them have some stuff that I don't find quite as vital; there are a few tracks in Mayfield's career I just don't like. (Imagine... not like anyone else, huh? heh )

And then a lot of the albums that were originally pretty short LPs have a bunch of extra tracks, outtakes, etc. Which is cool, unless you like to just pop an album on and not have to program around 3 slightly different versions of the same song.

And, I have to admit it, I'm not as familiar with certain parts of Mayfield's career as others. I'm doing the online equivalent of dropping the needle and there's a real range of stuff.

If it was me, I think I'd consider one of the larger collections. Some of them have more stuff from the Impressions, while some of it is restricted to his solo stuff. (And then there are some glossy duets and things... some of those among the ones I find problematic.)

I came to Mayfield late, myself, at least as a buyer. Back in the 70s, you couldn't escape the Superfly soundtrack, although I always figured I'd have to buy it if they ever stopped playing it.

When I went looking for it, quite some time ago, it wasn't even available on CD (boy, that's changed) and I ended up with an early GHits package that had more than a few of his great ones, including a small handful from S-Fly but also at least one have-to-skip ballad/duet.

If it sounds like I'm hedging, hemming, and hawing, here, you're right.

I'll say this... I think my favorite period for him is the early 70s, where his wah style has come into its own and there's often an undercurrent of nocturnal, if not outright menacing, funk.

Then again, one of my favorites is now the utterly optimistic, uplifting, joyful Move on Up... so, you know. It's hard to say...



_________________________

PS... speaking of the SF soundtrack... despite the imprecations of my pals, I never went to see Superfly back then. When I heard the word "blaxploitation" -- mostly what I heard was 'xploitation... And the first time or two I heard the theme song, I tried not to like it.

But then I heard Freddy's Dead and Pusherman and I thought, wow... that's pretty cool, he's like doing a greek chorus thing (in ancient greek drama, there would be a chorus of actors on stage who would comment on the action -- can't remember if they actually sang or not... I pretty much drew the line at Shakespeare and Moliere. Spike Lee uses a similar device in Do the Right Thing, with, I think, a trio of characters who pop up everywhere, commenting on what's going on.

Anyhow... once I caught hold of Mayfield's moral depth in approaching the material, I was really impressed. And, of course, I could let myself really sink into that dark, sinister, and very funky music.

Nice !

Thanks Blue1.
Old 11th August 2005
  #72
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7161's Avatar
 

Quote:
you didn't just say that Marvin only had 2 hits did ya?
hey, CLUB HIT was what i said (please quote properly), and i aint that old to remember farther back, so no doubt, he may have had other clubhits. (yeah I forgot about whats goin on, but it's more downtempo

but i always think of those 2 anyways as his 2 big clubhits, but the point is, was he R&B? - i never think of him as an rnb artist... a 'tamla' artist yes.

would you say he was an RnB artist ? - i wouldnt. I dont know anything about original RnB artists in terms of naming artists (apart from UK 60's RnB bands), but to me, RnB sounds like the music in-between the sketches in this audio.

http://www.dancetech.com/60s_acid_comedy.ram

that's RnB isn't it?
Old 11th August 2005
  #73
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I caught the tail end of the PBS show on STAX festival. Search on the PBS site for WATTSTAX.

I missed Albert King and many more so hopefully it will be on again.

Jim
Old 11th August 2005
  #74
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by no ssl yet
But hell where are the Gearslut collaborations. We encompass opinionated (hopefully talented ) folk from all over. We all have the gear/knowledge. WHERE are our good songs, good music etc.... THE difference always starts with self. IMO Surely some of us no good singers/musicians/people. Hook em up. Send some protools files around. INSPIRE!!!
'been thinkin' about this lately. It would be cool to have a section here for collaborators in different musical styles.

I tend to think music as a whole gets elevated to a level greater than the sum of the parts when more talented people are involved - writers, players,singers, producers. I think this type of collaboration is sorely lacking in today's R&B.
Old 11th August 2005
  #75
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kevinc's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by h2000
'been thinkin' about this lately. It would be cool to have a section here for collaborators in different musical styles.

I tend to think music as a whole gets elevated to a level greater than the sum of the parts when more talented people are involved - writers, players,singers, producers. I think this type of collaboration is sorely lacking in today's R&B.

I tried to do some collaberations with some of the folks here a while back.

The problem was there were too many names to juggle and emails to send and figuring out who`s going to do what and a lot of work came in and blah blah blah.... I managed to piss off a couple people and we never really finished anything though the scratch tracks that people sent in were very cool and it was nice to hear what everybody could do. Great potential but due to my poor orginazation (at least in cyberland) skills it didn`t amount to anything.

It`s one thing to write songs with a band in the real world but I found it a bit more complicated over the internet for some reason.

Just the same it was fun and I`d like to try it out again if anybody want`s to take the band leader position.
Old 12th August 2005
  #76
Gear Head
 

check out some jamie lidell

this is some mega thread so i haven't seen who you're all listening to but i just wanted to say check out jamie lidells album 'multiply' if you're into some serious future soul

he's an english guy living in berlin plus he's a bit nuts so he's probably not gonna get the press attention he deserves in the us but he walks all over jon legend or alicia keys

kinda like an updated sly stone (he can REALLY sing...........)
Old 13th August 2005
  #77
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 7161
anyways, RnB was already finished when those people were peaking as an original new commercial movement longtime cos it was a 60's thing (what we traditionaly call RnB) surely?

as far as i understand it about the term RnB as a brit, in the old days they had a 'Black' chart cos USA was still into aparthied, called 'The RnB chart' for 'black' music.... is that right? is it true? and that chart was separate from the mainstream chart??... anyways i understood that, and it kept that name long after the original RnB style had passed as a new/current style thing...
We certainly never saw what we were doing at Motown as being R&B!

R&B was the replacement term for "race" music which had been a black alternative to "hillbilly" music (which had recently begun being called "country and western.") Both of these genres were directed at poor middle-aged people who had left the rural south where music taught by the descendants of slaves had been an ordinary part of their lives. "Rock and roll" was all about shedding the Madison Avenue imposed racial identities from what had really been southeastern American folk music. The folks at Rolling Stone magazine decided that R&B was "hip" and many rock fans got into exploring it.

In the early '60s the R&B chart actually went away for a while until the marketing folks decided they could create and then profit from a new black racial identity. The first meal I ever had in a black church brought home what had happened. The food was right out of my grandmother's kitchen. She was descended from people who had settled Massachusetts in the 1600s and her family had virtually no contact with black or white southerners. Very traditional American food had actually been given a regional and racial identity!
Old 13th August 2005
  #78
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Kestral's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Olhsson
In the early '60s the R&B chart actually went away for a while until the marketing folks decided they could create and then profit from a new black racial identity. The first meal I ever had in a black church brought home what had happened. The food was right out of my grandmother's kitchen. She was descended from people who had settled Massachusetts in the 1600s and her family had virtually no contact with black or white southerners. Very traditional American food had actually been given a regional and racial identity!
I want to hear more about the food. What would be considered traditional American food at the time? thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup
Old 13th August 2005
  #79
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kevinc's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kestral
I want to hear more about the food. What would be considered traditional American food at the time? thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup

Yeah

Vintage food was better. heh
Old 13th August 2005
  #80
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinc
Yeah

Vintage food was better. heh
Vintage food is warmer.

Or is that smoother and creamier
Old 13th August 2005
  #81
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7161's Avatar
 

Quote:
We certainly never saw what we were doing at Motown as being R&B!

Not quite sure what you mean Bob, but yeah, Tamla is Tamla (what a monster sound!)

btw Bob, do you know any of the artists on that audio clip i posted up earlier in the thread ?

also wether that IS what you'd call rnb?

did you work for tamla back in the day?
Old 15th August 2005
  #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
What's your opinion on Maxwell?
Maxwell isn't r&b, not neo-soul either. Maxwell is SOUL.

I love all of his albums, but his first is the most special one for me.

Which reminds me, I have a slutty topic I'm going to start...
Old 15th August 2005
  #83
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Don't forget about the Dramatics, the Dells, the Delphonics and the many other great groups and singers who reside on my Ipod.

Ron Banks of the Dramatics had one of those voices that gives you chills.


Lawrence
Old 15th August 2005
  #84
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by no ssl yet
But hell where are the Gearslut collaborations. We encompass opinionated (hopefully talented ) folk from all over. We all have the gear/knowledge. WHERE are our good songs, good music etc.... THE difference always starts with self. IMO Surely some of us no good singers/musicians/people. Hook em up. Send some protools files around. INSPIRE!!! Do Something, OR stop bitchin about it not being done


This is not just a fan forum, most of us are in the trenches daily. If you want it changed, CHANGE IT
yeah! I'm in. When, Where?

Beside, I agree on what you sid earlier on songs. I think the artists that enjoy a lasting career, in any musical style, understand in a way or other that you need good songs to make good albums, prior to any kind of producing team, studio, etc...
Old 10th June 2006
  #85
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Tantrum The Cat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by docformat
this is some mega thread so i haven't seen who you're all listening to but i just wanted to say check out jamie lidells album 'multiply' if you're into some serious future soul

he's an english guy living in berlin plus he's a bit nuts so he's probably not gonna get the press attention he deserves in the us but he walks all over jon legend or alicia keys

kinda like an updated sly stone (he can REALLY sing...........)

REVIVE!

This album has been one of my ABSOLUTE faves over the last year-and-a-half, and I'm surpised that it didn't get namechecked more around here, as the vocals, music, writing and production are all absolutely fantastic. It's also worth mentioning that Jamie is a SMOKING live singer, and the accompanying 'Multiply Additions' album of remixes is well worth checking out too.
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