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She's So Unusual
Old 5th August 2005
  #31
[QUOTE=
B was an INCREDIBLE room.
Perhaps the best sounding rock band room I've ever heard anywhere.
Ridiculously live for its size; which is why it worked if you could figure it out.
Some pople went in there and made it sound just awful... you had to know how to USE the room, not fight it.[/QUOTE]

Was B the room that had the API w the 560 eq's? I did a few sessions there, I remember being jazzed that I got to work at the Record Plant, I remember that board, and I remember the mix room having a Neve V. That was near the end of the Record Plant. I only did some overdubs and mix, but for me a nice memory and I learned a couple of tricks there.
Old 5th August 2005
  #32
Lives for gear
 
greggybud's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwittman

Cyndi, right now, is resting!
We're in the middle of another record that I start mixing on August 15.

(I also play in her live band these last 5 years, if you didn't know)
Cyndi was booked for the county fair in my hometown of Eugene Oregon for the fair in August and somehow she got replaced by David Lee Roth What a let-down!

Anyway I just wanted to add, and I dont know if you were the remixer, but She Bop is still one of my favoirte remixes. Remixes of this era still demonstrated great originality, and creativity without deviating too far from the LP mix or becoming too boring by relying on too many drum machines and sequencers. Durring this era I think it was extremely easy to go overboard with samplers triggering the stuttering etc..... But with She Bop either you had many tracks not used on the LP mix or someone specificly recorded many extra tracks knowing this would be a hit and a remix would be required.

Were the singles chosen shortly after mixdown of the LP mix?
Old 5th August 2005
  #33
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Musiclab
Was B the room that had the API w the 560 eq's? I did a few sessions there, I remember being jazzed that I got to work at the Record Plant, I remember that board, and I remember the mix room having a Neve V. That was near the end of the Record Plant. I only did some overdubs and mix, but for me a nice memory and I learned a couple of tricks there.
Yes B had the API with all 560's in it.

the MIXROOM never had a Neve in it, it had the big 56 in custom Trident TSM with GML.

Studio C, BRIEFLY had a V in it... which was more or less the beginning of the end.
the first crappy sounding desk that ever went in to those rooms.
Old 5th August 2005
  #34
Lives for gear
The She Bop dance mix was done by Junior Vasquez (I believe).
He overdubbed the extra elements just for the dance mix, there weren't any unused elements on the original 24 track.


The singles got picked in the usual manner, one at a time!

It was always planned that Girls should be first, and that the whole project KIND OF hinged on that song's success.
As it turned out, it set up the rest of the record really well and Time followed it and went to #1.

Then She Bop, All Through The Night, and Money Changes Everything.
... if I recall correctly.
Old 5th August 2005
  #35
Gear Maniac
 

I had read somewhere that a Ursa Major Space Station was used on this album on some of the vocals, not true?
Old 5th August 2005
  #36
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wwittman
Was that John Agnello?
John assisted me on She's So Unusual and was my engineer on lots of records after that until he went off on his own to produce (and became an indie god)

That empty warehouse space on the 10th floor was affectionately (and sarcastically) called Studio E...
it was in the back behind the Mixroom.

When we had moved up to the Mixroom to finish the record, there were some vocals remaining to be done.
And for some of them, Cyndi decided she wanted to sing in 'E'.
First off, it was big and empty and weird and i think she liked that!
And second, we couldn't see her at all in there and it was somehow liberating for her.

Half of Girls was sung in there and half was the vocal from downstairs in B... i made the switch, in the mix, during the solo.

What was your band called?

B was an INCREDIBLE room.
Perhaps the best sounding rock band room I've ever heard anywhere.
Ridiculously live for its size; which is why it worked if you could figure it out.
Some pople went in there and made it sound just awful... you had to know how to USE the room, not fight it.
Very cool!

Yes, okay, so it was the 10th floor! Silly me. I remember that B had the moving sound absorbers on the walls. That room was incredible and we used it for room reverb on the drums. That reverb made it to the final mix which Jimbo Barton did for us. Amazing. The band was called Powermad. It never went anywhere really. We did a David Lynch movie, but that was about it. I remember seeing the mic lead running down into studio B from Studio "e" and asking what the hell it was all about! Now I can confirm it was true. Aw, just wonderful. That desk and those 560's were just so neat. I didn't know much about gear then, but I can certainly appreciate it now. Thanks so much for coming up with John's last name. I believe that was him who helped engineer our record. He was a great, and extremely patient.

What projects did he go on to do?

Thanks so much for replying Mr. Wittman. It is good to make contact with you!

This brings back great memories.

Joel DuBay
Old 12th August 2005
  #37
Lives for gear
I did use the Space Station on lots of vocals, and probably on that record as well.. but I can't honestly say I remember WHERE exactly.

Yes, B also had those rotatable panels with hard wood on one side of the triangle and two soft sides on the others... but even with them flipped to the soft sides it was STILL unbelievably live!
Plus only an 11' ceiling at its highest so that ony served to magnify the splashy character in there.

John Agnello went on to engineer lots of records with me, including the Outfield and The Fixx, and then on to produce

I'd only screw up his creidts so I'd suggest going to allmusic.com and searching for John Agnello.

his brother, Anthony, is also the guy who invented the Eventide Harmoniser (which is fairly brilliant and important as well!)
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