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Buzz Feiten Tuning System: Any Experiences?
Old 3rd August 2005
  #1
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DAWgEAR's Avatar
 

Buzz Feiten Tuning System: Any Experiences?

The title pretty much says it all.

I have reached the point where I am fed up with tuning, intonating, re-tuning, re-intonating, ad nauseum and still not being able to get rid of the out-of-tune beating on some chords, especially when sustained with distortion. I own a number of guitars and it's not something specific to just one guitar.

I am thinking of having this mod done to one of my guitars, with the rest to follow if it makes a noticable difference.

Any first hand experiences, thoughts, or suggested alternatives?

Thanks in advance!
Old 3rd August 2005
  #2
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Absolutely thumbs up!! thumbsup

Positively the one 'permanent' mod I would recommend for a studio instrument. Every single guitarest who has ever played my main recording guitar (Washburn Idol) has commented on the tuning.

Noticable difference? Without question IME.

Feel free to PM me for some specific personal experiences with this system and others.

P&B,
Old 3rd August 2005
  #3
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max cooper's Avatar
 

Say, I've always wondered about this; but I use a bunch of different tunings. Does it work with other tunings; and with different tunings on the same guitar?
Old 3rd August 2005
  #4
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crypticglobe's Avatar
Yup, I have had it on several guitars. I agree it's great, especially for studio. However, I now have the Earvana nuts on all my guitars. It's a similar concept, but all you have to do is replace your nut. It's every bit as accurate, and a lot cheaper.

I couldn't believe what a difference it made. I can just tune the guitar with a tuner... and I am done. It really rings properly no matter where I play. I suggest having a qualified guitar technician instal this. There are a few little things to watch for, as indicated on their website. I have Greg at Classic Ax here in Nashville do my guitars. He is great!

Just my 2 cents...

Old 3rd August 2005
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crypticglobe
Yup, I have had it on several guitars. I agree it's great, especially for studio. However, I now have the Earvana nuts on all my guitars. It's a similar concept, but all you have to do is replace your nut. It's every bit as accurate, and a lot cheaper.


First let me say I love Deneen and Rick at Earvana...Super beautiful folks...and I always wish them the best!
I was one of thier first endorsed recording artists and my previous shop 'The Tone Yard' was an authorized Earvana installation shop.

They (Buzz Feiten and Earvana) both have their strengths...but they are not the same thing.

I suggest looking into both...and deciding for yourself.
Either one will be a huge improvement...!!

I must admit that I was biased for a long time as an Earvana user....Excellent product and excellent people...And when I had the Buzz System installed I had it done at the factory even though I am a qualified and competent guitar tech. I wasn't willing to do it myself.

I have to say bashfully that the my main guitar uses the BF system....and it is awesome!

I would recommend Earvana to anyone...at anytime...but not without also recommending BF now that I have used both...

Maybe Rick or Deneen could chime in here with their expertise?


P&B,
Old 4th August 2005
  #6
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DAWgEAR's Avatar
 

Thanks for the replies.

OK, now I am enlightened and confused! Darn choices! heh

Aside from the fact that I now have to actually make a choice, some things that I am concerned about with either system:

After installation of either product, will I be able to do my own setups and intonation (involving the bridge saddles)? Or will I be dependent on an authorized installer to have any setup work done in the future?

Will I need a special tuner? I believe Peterson's tuners offer BFTS compatibility. I haven't heard about Earvana before.

Are these valid concerns?

Thanks again.
Old 4th August 2005
  #7
Gear Maniac
 
Amplove's Avatar
 

me too.

I too was wondering if the Buzz system is worth the money and time. And the Earvana too.

I heard from one person that (apparently) heard from other persons, that it causes problems when playing with other guitar players. But that seemed really strange to me. Isn't an E an E and an A is an A, provided that it's truely in tune to that note? And...if playing with other guitars players, and I've had the system done to my guitar, then my guitar is going to be... IN TUNE. And as far as the other guitar player is concerned, if he's out of tune, then that's one less guitar player out of tune. Correct? If a piano is in tune, I certainly don't have problems playing with an in tune piano and a piano is by far a more accurate instrument.

Almost all my guitars are from the 60's and sometimes I seriously will pull them off one by one in frustration trying to find one that I can play an open A AND an F on and have both chords be in tune, only to come back to the first guitar. Then I get pissed. dfegad

J.
Old 4th August 2005
  #8
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Before this gets out of hand over the course of history, debates over temperament have resulted in people being beheaded, tortured etc. etc. Let's keep it civilized here!

And, a piano is stretch tuned which is a compromise to best accomodate it's ability to (arguably) be played in all keys. The BF and Earvana systems are (major oversimplification here) adapting a form of stretch tuning to suit the physics of a guitar.

The only tuned tempered stringed instruments (again arguably) would be modal instruments (like a dulcimer)

I'll shut up now cause I'm sure other know way more about this than me

I recently played an Earvana'd guitar and liked it immensely.....I also like the fact that the process is reversible (without surgery). I'm not crazy about the retrofit versions screws and all, the OEM looks fine though.

Also AFAIK, one needs a MkII Peterson for BF, the better Korg's do BF too....both systems may cause a rub with another guitar player but will blend better with keyboards.

Andy
Old 4th August 2005
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sysexguy

Also AFAIK, one needs a MkII Peterson for BF, the better Korg's do BF too....

Andy
For setting Intonation...not for tuning.

P&B
Old 4th August 2005
  #10
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Ruphus's Avatar
 

BTW, can anyone name a well reputated luthier in Berlin / Germany?

Ruphus
Old 4th August 2005
  #11
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alphajerk's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodney Gene
I...And when I had the Buzz System installed I had it done at the factory even though I am a qualified and competent guitar tech. I wasn't willing to do it myself.
how do you feel about that now? would you DIY now? they make it seem rather simple [for one who has tech'd guitars]...
Old 4th August 2005
  #12
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DAWgEAR's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruphus
BTW, can anyone name a well reputated luthier in Berlin / Germany?

Ruphus
I don't know anything about reputations, but if you are looking for Buzz Feiten Authorized retrofitters in Germany (or other countries), there is a list at his site.

At the Earvana site, it looks like the closest listed luthier is in the UK.
Old 4th August 2005
  #13
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isn't plek in Berlin? if so, either they could do the work or recommend someone

http://www.plek.de/index.php?master=...+Center+Berlin

Andy
Old 4th August 2005
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alphajerk
how do you feel about that now? would you DIY now? they make it seem rather simple [for one who has tech'd guitars]...

Brother alpha barrett...!

No I still wouldn't do it myself ...my passion for tech work today is pretty much non-exisitent . I would much rather leave it up to somebody who actually 'liked' to do it and was trained for it!! ...It is the kind of mod that can genuinely screw with your guitar if not done 'well'.

I am sure I could 'adapt' as I go but I wouldn't want my own guitar to be my first and I just ain't that into it.

Probably the reason for much of the negative out there. Bad install jobs, bad results....You can't do an OK job with the buzz system and get away with it.

The 'Earvana' nuts are alot more user friendly...simple swap and tweak. But even then the 'tweaking' part can take a long time until you get used to the way it is supposed to sound and intonate.

P&B,

FWIW I have never had trouble with any other (non feiten) guitars or string instruments playing in tune together.
Old 4th August 2005
  #15
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every single one of the guitars i work with have been Feitenized.

the upside to the buzz system is that it makes a significant imrovement to how a guitar will sound when chords are played - especially as you go further up the neck. they seem to be in better tune and sort-of sparkle (for lack of a better explanation). it will also sound better with piano and keyboard.

the downside is that it requires a high degree of committment. first, any tuner will work well but you will need a Feitin capable tuner (korg dt-7) to get the absolute most out of the process, then eventually every other guitar in your collection or band because it's addictive - exept for the bass player unless he/she is all about les claypool. it's hard to explain except that when we compared a perfectly good normal setup with the feitinized guitars - the normal guitar didn't blend quite as well and sounded constantly out of tune by comparison. the difference is subtle but still readily hearable.

these days, for electrics, the Feitin process is easily undoable. For Acoustics it's more expensive to do and undo.

Last, I will say that the first place any new guitar goes in my little outfit is to a top-notch, Feitin Qualified tech so it will sound in tune.

Cheers,
Old 4th August 2005
  #16
Here for the gear
 

hands down best low fret intonation fix ive encountered.
night and day difference in the first 3 frets which are always a pain in the ass.
Old 4th August 2005
  #17
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another thing. the "Tempered" tuning scheme of a piano is widely regarded as more musical or pleasing than the Chromatic scheme of a standard guitar. The compensated tuning systems for guitars are trying to get close to a Tempered setup.
Old 4th August 2005
  #18
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Thank you, DAWgear!

Quote:
Originally Posted by sysexguy
isn't plek in Berlin? if so, either they could do the work or recommend someone

http://www.plek.de/index.php?master=...+Center+Berlin

Andy
Hey, finally a luthier in Berlin and even around just a couple corners!
Thank you very much for the link! I´m gonna give them a call.

Ruphus
Old 4th August 2005
  #19
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cdog's Avatar
The BF system is awesome if you're really picky about every note on the fretboard being 100% in tune.

Luckily for me, I'm not this picky.

Have you ever listened to Hendrix live at Monterrey?

One of my favorite albums.

Old 5th August 2005
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sysexguy
Before this gets out of hand over the course of history, debates over temperament have resulted in people being beheaded, tortured etc. etc. Let's keep it civilized here!

And, a piano is stretch tuned which is a compromise to best accomodate it's ability to (arguably) be played in all keys. The BF and Earvana systems are (major oversimplification here) adapting a form of stretch tuning to suit the physics of a guitar.

The only tuned tempered stringed instruments (again arguably) would be modal instruments (like a dulcimer)

I'll shut up now cause I'm sure other know way more about this than me
...

Andy
Andy is on point here.

I've always been curious about the Feiten system -- but it cannot by itself overcome the 'limitations' of tempered scale(s) that pianos and guitars use.

If you understand the problems inherent in equal temperament, you'll realize that, to some extent, imprecise harmonic intervals will always be with us (as long as we use that system, I mean). (Although there's been fascinating new work in dynamic intonation with synthesizers that's being adopted by an expanding array of manufacturers -- but that's for another thread, I think.)

It's not the guitar, necessarily, that's always out of tune. Pianos are also "out of tune" as well -- at least when viewed from the perspective of a single scale. It's our whole equal temperament system.

But without it, modern music could never have evolved in the fashion it has. Key changes would be impractical -- even between movements. Modulation would be all but impossible in many keys.

BTW... I usually retune (or rather retouch the tuning on) my guitar when I change keys. It's not a cure-all, of course, and it does, indeed, make some inversions problematic. But it helps. I'll bet lots of folks do it instinctively. (Think about going from a song in, say, G, to a song in D... don't you usually at least 'test' the D chord before you start playing?)
Old 5th August 2005
  #21
Gear Maniac
 

Okay here is a subject I consider myself to be an expert on, lol.

If you take a strobe tuner, and check out your average guitar, you will discover that the open strings are flat! Some are disasterously so. Many acoustic guitar players find that the low E string plays sharp when they play a "G" chord, or the "B" string is sharp when they play a "D" chord, or if that "fix" that, then the "B" plays flat when they play an "E" major chord. The list goes on. Yes, these same people don't have this problem when they use a capo.

Here's the proof: Get a strobe tuner, and make note of the readings when you play the open string, vs. the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th fret. You will find, assuming your intonation is not whacked out, that the fretted notes will read more or less the same, but the open string will be flat. To some degree. All these years, people have been intonating their guitars based on the open string. No wonder they can't get them to play in tune.

The fix: Move the "jump off" point of the string closer to the first fret. The BF and Earvana methods are improvements, but don't really solve the problem, but for different reasons. With the BF nut, all strings are moved in a "preset" manner, one that does not necessarily totally solve the problem for THAT instrument, with THAT setup (string choice and action height are key here). Plus, as some instruments suffer quite a bit more than others, a "preset choice" nut is a compromise at best. The BF System comes with the recommendation that you purchace a specific tuner (they recommend a peticular Korg model, as well as a peticular Peterson Strobe model), that have the BF Tuning System offsets bulit into them. What they really mean is that they are going to tell you how out-of-tune to make your open stings so that the fretted notes play okay. This is really stupid, folks. First, because what we REALLY want is the WHOLE guitar to play in tune, and that includes the open strings, and second, because every guitar has this issue to a different degree, even the offsets they are recommending are "approximate". This is like trying to design a suspension bridge without ever visiting the site where it is going to be built. Still, the system has it's fans, as it WILL improve things, but we can do better than this.

The Earvana fails in a key area. It's nut is adjustable, like an electric guitar bridge, and because of that, lacks the solid tone that a standard nut has. Do a google search, and you will find Martin and Taylor users who loved the intonation improvement, but took it off anyway because they hated what it did to the sound of their guitar. Now I know there are people who are going to disagree with this, but don't disagree with me, I'm not the one who made those posts. Other historical examples of "floppy" string anchors that made people hate their guitars would include the Kahler tremolo bridge, which with it's "roller" saddles gave your guitar the sustain of a banjo, the Wilkinson nut that Fender used for a while (ditto), and let's not forget the Fender Jazzmaster and Jaguar bridges, with little if any downward pressure on their saddles. Made for some rather dead tone. And oh yes, all the Gibson acoustic guitars that had a "Tunematic" (electric guitar bridges) imbedded in the bridge. These are all examples of flaky tone induced by "loose" anchors. The Earvana nut is in the camp as well. You would only notice this on the open strings, but that's big in my book.

What to do. There is a great solution, but it takes some effort, as well as a skilled guitar tech to do it. But it will blow away all these other options, and give you intonation that will rival a freshly tuned concert grand piano.

Take some bridge saddle material (or a little thicker), and glue it to the end of the nut, as well as the fingerboard, thereby making your nut into an "L" shaped nut, not unlike the BF or Earvana. The material must be radiused to match the fingerboard, of course. If it is shaped carefully before gluing, there will be very little trimming and shaping to do. Seeing as this must all be done while ON the instrument, one should get is as shaped as possible before gluing it.

Extend the srting slots through it, but keep them very shallow, as you will be removing more material. There is a lot more detail to this of course, but any good tech will figure that out, so I will keep this simple for explaination purposes.

Put the strings back on. File the slots to normal playing level. Take out the strobe tuner. Tune the guitar AT THE FIRST FRET. Now check the next few frets, and verify that they all read more or less the same. Now check the open string. It should be slightly sharp (because of the nut extension). With a Dremel Mototool, remove a little material (that string ONLY), and check with the strobe again. Work slowly, as if you go to far, you have to start over! Do all six strings. Check and double check. Notice how each string will end up sith a different "jump-off" point. When you have the open strings and the first few frsts matching, you now have a guitar that makes the BF system look like the half-measure that it is. Enjoy.

Oh, and I own a bunch of old tube mics, which sound better with an in-tune guitar (back on topic!)

Mark Dann
Old 5th August 2005
  #22
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doorknocker's Avatar
Is there a Feiten setup for sitar ?

Just kidding, but maybe not.

You know, I never tried this system and I'm sure it helps for 'tempered intonation' but like others said above, this whole issue goes way deeper than any compensated nut....

What I didn't see mentioned here is playing technique. Personally, I rely on a big amount of string-bending, often double or even triple stops. So my issue is mostly about intonating the bends, taking up Dobro and Lap Steel has helped me enousmously even on the regular, fretted guitar BTW.

The issue of string bending, especially in rock/blues gets you in the realm of micro-tonalism. I find this tremendoulsy interesting but I guess a lot of people don't understand this, especially in blues, where a lot of vastly different players get all put in a certain 'same sounding' bag.

If you analize a great B.B King solo, you'll find that he does things like intonating the major third slightly flat and intonating the fifth slightly sharp- by design.
A lot of people don't seem to distinguish between a 'microtonal-savvy' blues player and an 'out of tune' one.

That's why I brought up Indian music, the 12-tones/tempered outlook of music is but a small Euro-centric view of things and most developments from the late 19th century on (regardless whether it was labeled as 'classical,serious' or 'jazz/blues' etc) went beyond that.

o.k, this is mainly apppliable to single note melodies where you're TOTALLY dependent on the player chosing the intonation, supposing the guitar is in shape naturally.

But like others have better explained than I ever could, the 'problem' with chords is a big one. The 'breakthrough' with Bach's 'Well-tempered piano' had a downside, you lose some of the beauty of playing 'naturally' in a certain key for the sake of being able to play in every key.....but you do this by compromise.

People don't sing like that! But that's also being 'leveled' thanks to AutoTune these days.

And what about overtones? Say you play a g note, no matter how well-tempered your g is, the overtones WON'T be tempered but rather happen according to 'nature's laws'. Now distortion will really bring out overtones and so does the angle/place where you pick the note. This is obvipusly a big deal as so much guitar playing relies on distorted sound. To me, that and string-bending are probably the most fascinating aspects of guitar playing, the way you can turn a note 'upside down' by stressing the harmonic ove the root note,etc,,,

Just a few thoughts, and again this shouldn't be seen as a critisism of the Feiten system, but personally I think the technical/musical issues of guitar playing go way beyond that.

Andi

www.doorknocker.ch
Old 5th August 2005
  #23
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Ruphus's Avatar
 

Quote:
Take some bridge saddle material (or a little thicker), and glue it to the end of the nut, as well as the fingerboard, thereby making your nut into an "L" shaped nut, not unlike the BF or Earvana.
I don´t like the idea of glueing the additional piece on the fingerboard. Wouldn´t it be good enough to just arrange an L-shaped nut and go from there?

Ruphus
Old 5th August 2005
  #24
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Isn't that what the oem earvana does? http://www.earvana.com/products_nuts_strat_close.html

I assume this requires some routing to the nut closer to the first fret....but it eliminates the screw on part that looks ugly and results in an addition surface for vibration transfer....and I will surmise that this will affect fretted notes too!

Andy
Old 5th August 2005
  #25
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crypticglobe's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark107
Okay here is a subject I consider myself to be an expert on, lol.

If you take a strobe tuner, and check out your average guitar, you will discover that the open strings are flat! Some are disasterously so. Many acoustic guitar players find that the low E string plays sharp when they play a "G" chord, or the "B" string is sharp when they play a "D" chord, or if that "fix" that, then the "B" plays flat when they play an "E" major chord. The list goes on. Yes, these same people don't have this problem when they use a capo.

Here's the proof: Get a strobe tuner, and make note of the readings when you play the open string, vs. the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th fret. You will find, assuming your intonation is not whacked out, that the fretted notes will read more or less the same, but the open string will be flat. To some degree. All these years, people have been intonating their guitars based on the open string. No wonder they can't get them to play in tune.

The fix: Move the "jump off" point of the string closer to the first fret. The BF and Earvana methods are improvements, but don't really solve the problem, but for different reasons. With the BF nut, all strings are moved in a "preset" manner, one that does not necessarily totally solve the problem for THAT instrument, with THAT setup (string choice and action height are key here). Plus, as some instruments suffer quite a bit more than others, a "preset choice" nut is a compromise at best. The BF System comes with the recommendation that you purchace a specific tuner (they recommend a peticular Korg model, as well as a peticular Peterson Strobe model), that have the BF Tuning System offsets bulit into them. What they really mean is that they are going to tell you how out-of-tune to make your open stings so that the fretted notes play okay. This is really stupid, folks. First, because what we REALLY want is the WHOLE guitar to play in tune, and that includes the open strings, and second, because every guitar has this issue to a different degree, even the offsets they are recommending are "approximate". This is like trying to design a suspension bridge without ever visiting the site where it is going to be built. Still, the system has it's fans, as it WILL improve things, but we can do better than this.

The Earvana fails in a key area. It's nut is adjustable, like an electric guitar bridge, and because of that, lacks the solid tone that a standard nut has. Do a google search, and you will find Martin and Taylor users who loved the intonation improvement, but took it off anyway because they hated what it did to the sound of their guitar. Now I know there are people who are going to disagree with this, but don't disagree with me, I'm not the one who made those posts. Other historical examples of "floppy" string anchors that made people hate their guitars would include the Kahler tremolo bridge, which with it's "roller" saddles gave your guitar the sustain of a banjo, the Wilkinson nut that Fender used for a while (ditto), and let's not forget the Fender Jazzmaster and Jaguar bridges, with little if any downward pressure on their saddles. Made for some rather dead tone. And oh yes, all the Gibson acoustic guitars that had a "Tunematic" (electric guitar bridges) imbedded in the bridge. These are all examples of flaky tone induced by "loose" anchors. The Earvana nut is in the camp as well. You would only notice this on the open strings, but that's big in my book.

What to do. There is a great solution, but it takes some effort, as well as a skilled guitar tech to do it. But it will blow away all these other options, and give you intonation that will rival a freshly tuned concert grand piano.

Take some bridge saddle material (or a little thicker), and glue it to the end of the nut, as well as the fingerboard, thereby making your nut into an "L" shaped nut, not unlike the BF or Earvana. The material must be radiused to match the fingerboard, of course. If it is shaped carefully before gluing, there will be very little trimming and shaping to do. Seeing as this must all be done while ON the instrument, one should get is as shaped as possible before gluing it.

Extend the srting slots through it, but keep them very shallow, as you will be removing more material. There is a lot more detail to this of course, but any good tech will figure that out, so I will keep this simple for explaination purposes.

Put the strings back on. File the slots to normal playing level. Take out the strobe tuner. Tune the guitar AT THE FIRST FRET. Now check the next few frets, and verify that they all read more or less the same. Now check the open string. It should be slightly sharp (because of the nut extension). With a Dremel Mototool, remove a little material (that string ONLY), and check with the strobe again. Work slowly, as if you go to far, you have to start over! Do all six strings. Check and double check. Notice how each string will end up sith a different "jump-off" point. When you have the open strings and the first few frsts matching, you now have a guitar that makes the BF system look like the half-measure that it is. Enjoy.

Oh, and I own a bunch of old tube mics, which sound better with an in-tune guitar (back on topic!)

Mark Dann


Hey Mark,

The Earvana nut is not adjustable. I have them on all my guitars. They are a solid nut with a preset offset for each string. They not only have completely solved tuning issues for me (professional sessions guitarist, and producer/engineer here), and for anyone that plays these guitars, but also improved the tonal quality or left it unaffected on all of my guitars.

What are you talking about when you say they are adjustable? I have never seen an adjustable nut offered by them?? It sounds like you are indeed very knowledgable on this topic, but perhaps not fully familiar with the Earvana product?

At any rate.... To All: I still recommend Earvana HIGHLY. I never even think about tuning any more, it was inexpensive and REALLY works. Open strings and fretted strings ALL show up PERFECTLY in tune even on a strobe. They sound that way too.
Old 5th August 2005
  #26
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Ruphus's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sysexguy
Isn't that what the oem earvana does? http://www.earvana.com/products_nuts_strat_close.html

I assume this requires some routing to the nut closer to the first fret....but it eliminates the screw on part that looks ugly and results in an addition surface for vibration transfer....and I will surmise that this will affect fretted notes too!

Andy
That looks better than those models with screws. How does that one work? How do you adjust it?

Thanks,

Ruphus
Old 5th August 2005
  #27
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crypticglobe
Hey Mark,

The Earvana nut is not adjustable. I have them on all my guitars. They are a solid nut with a preset offset for each string. They not only have completely solved tuning issues for me (professional sessions guitarist, and producer/engineer here), and for anyone that plays these guitars, but also improved the tonal quality or left it unaffected on all of my guitars.

What are you talking about when you say they are adjustable? I have never seen an adjustable nut offered by them?? It sounds like you are indeed very knowledgable on this topic, but perhaps not fully familiar with the Earvana product?

At any rate.... To All: I still recommend Earvana HIGHLY. I never even think about tuning any more, it was inexpensive and REALLY works. Open strings and fretted strings ALL show up PERFECTLY in tune even on a strobe. They sound that way too.

Then they must have changed their product since the last time I looked at their website. Good for them. Still, because different guitar have this issue to different degrees (a quick check of any five guitars with a strobe tuner will illustrate that), it will work "better" on some guitars than others. If it's working great on ALL of yours, then luck is obviously in your favor!
Old 5th August 2005
  #28
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meteor's Avatar
 

The BF nuts are somewhat brand-specific (I play a Gibson and they make nuts specifically for different Gibsons). Also, the BF system requires some specific arrangements on the bridge.
Old 5th August 2005
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crypticglobe
Hey Mark,
What are you talking about when you say they are adjustable? I have never seen an adjustable nut offered by them?? It sounds like you are indeed very knowledgable on this topic, but perhaps not fully familiar with the Earvana product?

I don't know when they changed but Earvana nuts were always adjustable...Every single one I have owned (6) are fully adjustable....each with 3 screws.

Old 5th August 2005
  #30
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crypticglobe's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark107
Then they must have changed their product since the last time I looked at their website. Good for them. Still, because different guitar have this issue to different degrees (a quick check of any five guitars with a strobe tuner will illustrate that), it will work "better" on some guitars than others. If it's working great on ALL of yours, then luck is obviously in your favor!

Ok... I stand corrected... all my strat and tele's, and the PRS have a completely non-adjustable nut, but the one on the Les Paul is adjustable (I had to go look at them all for a sanity check).

And ya know... sure enough.. the Les Paul is the one I still experience some tuning problems with now that I think about it (I don't use it nearly as much as the other guitars). The tone is really good on it though.

Oh well... all of this not to start any kind of debate... but just to say I am VERY well pleased with my Earvana equipped guitars.

Here is the info on the "OEM" nut that I have on most of my guitars. As you can clearly see on their website... it is a non-adjustable nut.
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