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Producer Management Insights from the pros?
Old 8th August 2006
  #31
Gear Maniac
 

Ex-Manager Haiku

moving into the meeting
the ponytail takes with him
some discography misrepresentation


Old 8th August 2006
  #32
Lives for gear
 
stealthbalance's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules View Post
Lets write poetry to our ex producer managers!

You were excited when we met
About all the jobs for me you would get
About indie rock you started off with no knowledge
With me around, I was your college
The leads I gave you you followed up
But also mentioned the bigger producers on your roster
That took interest away from me
And lead me to believe you smelled of wee
You humped your way through A&R
while I f**ked my career at the bar
I have had 4 of you fair weather friends
Long term damage worse than the bends
Typical music biz liar
I wouldn't p**s on you if you were on.......

HEY! there HAS to be some good ones out there! heh

Right?
*************

LOL ......absolute genius and absolute truth !

s
Old 8th August 2006
  #33
Lives for gear
 
Curve Dominant's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by slipperman View Post
Is there anyplace more persistently uncomfortable than the intersection of art and commerce?

Not for me their ain't.

A healthy sense of absurdist humor is one's best weapon, and the most difficult one to obtain and maintain, IMHO.

I'll say the following THREE things about "Managing yourself" in the current music business climate:

1.) The "Good Old Boy network" sucks until yer in it.... then it becomes something you take for granted/underestimate till you get booted again.

2.) It's hard to comprehend/endure the 'separation of man and businessman' at the receiving end of the lance... then, after a bit of suffering, you realize that... until you not only understand, but EMBRACE this very mindset, you will continue to be viewed as a naive weakling. This clarion call to the "yoke of the merchant" is a dreadful realization indeed.... as it relates directly to acceptance of the spectre of imminent capitulation to mortality(a race for the creation of art - in both propagation and DISCOVERY - vs. the persistence of time), and our basic human desire to be treated, and treat others, fairly, and with respect.

My father, a devout Catholic, called this the "Challenge of the Christian Businessman".

I always suspected the term "Christian Businessman" was more than a tad oxymoronic.

3.) It's easiest to keep from crossing daggers over the "Plunder of War" when you have little or nothing to fight about... so consider this phenomenon before you embroil someone you "Love" or "Trust completely" to champion you as a relative(pun intended) unknown. If success in one's career entails the "Collateral damage" of the complete and utter destruction of one's emotional and familial universe... Make sure you are indeed ready to accept that possibility as a "Fair Exchange" for the Western trappings and concepts of "Success". Should you be so lucky/unlucky to achieve such a thing.

And success or not... if you DO end up getting somebody ya care about to "Do yer Dirty Work", don't be amazed if they come home covered in sh*t, and spend a fair amount of time bringing it to your attention/blaming you for it.

On the other hand, there is no way to separate risk from opportunity... Nor suffering from art.

In closing on my mini business rant.

In the end.... Business, any kind of friggin' business sucks.

No way around it.

'Cause, if YOU win..... SOMEBODY'S GOTTA LOSE.

So get over it.

You either burn it as fuel, a fuel which propels you in your artistic and professional endeavors... or you let it pool around you... and watch as it chews away your life and mind.

End of story.

SM.

PS. Sorry to sound so bleak,

As I mentioned at the top... Ya gotta push the blackness away and laugh about it!!!

Whooeeee!!!

We had an old slogan we used to stick on t-shirts and business cards around here for years:

KILL EVERYONE - THEN YOU'LL BE SAFE.

I used to feel genuine sympathy for folks who didn't get the joke.
May I compliment this post, without my compliment being deleted?

I compliment this post.

This post is one of the classics, which anyone serious about this "craft," this game, this racket...should feel compelled to print out and post on the wall of the studio meant for such priority postings.
Old 8th August 2006
  #34
Anybody actually have a positive story about producer/engineer management, or about a worthwhile individual? And just to satisfy curiosity, who are the major players in this racket... er, service?
Old 8th August 2006
  #35
Lives for gear
 
Curve Dominant's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules View Post
Best time to shop for a manager is with a hit record in the charts.

All other times are far less good times to shop for a manager...
With all due respect, Jules, I don't see that as an absolute rule.

Many producers have been seriously gutted by "managers" as soon as they hit the charts.

Conversely...it doesn't hurt an up-and-coming producer to form a professional rapport with an established and credible lawyer/manager. Or to get on the bottom rung at a big agency.

That sets up a challenge for the aspiring producer, and the good ones step up.

So by the time it comes to negotiating the deal for the recording that "hits," the professional relationship is already in place with your lawyer/manager.

Just as long as it's all on a project-by-project basis. That's what keeps it honest: When either party can walk at any time.
Old 8th August 2006
  #36
Lives for gear
 
djui5's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curve Dominant View Post
With all due respect, Jules, I don't see that as an absolute rule.

Many producers have been seriously gutted by "managers" as soon as they hit the charts.

Conversely...it doesn't hurt an up-and-coming producer to form a professional rapport with an established and credible lawyer/manager. Or to get on the bottom rung at a big agency.

That sets up a challenge for the aspiring producer, and the good ones step up.

So by the time it comes to negotiating the deal for the recording that "hits," the professional relationship is already in place with your lawyer/manager.

Just as long as it's all on a project-by-project basis. That's what keeps it honest: When either party can walk at any time.

Not quite that simple Curver. I've tried the management thing, and unless you've got a string of major releases, or something currently on the radio/charts/hits, they don't wanna talk to you.

See, they don't get you work, and if your not making a ton of money or are largly popular, why would they wanna work with you? You have nothing to offer them, and they have nothing to do for you. If they can't make a bunch of money from you, they won't take you on.

There is one exception, if you know someone. If your friend is a manager, or a friend hooks you up with a new manager.

It's a f"ked up business, but we all know that.
Old 8th August 2006
  #37
Gear Maniac
 
knightsy's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by slipperman View Post
2.) It's hard to comprehend/endure the 'separation of man and businessman' at the receiving end of the lance... then, after a bit of suffering, you realize that... until you not only understand, but EMBRACE this very mindset, you will continue to be viewed as a naive weakling. This clarion call to the "yoke of the merchant" is a dreadful realization indeed.... as it relates directly to acceptance of the spectre of imminent capitulation to mortality(a race for the creation of art - in both propagation and DISCOVERY - vs. the persistence of time), and our basic human desire to be treated, and treat others, fairly, and with respect.
Mate, maybe it's just the usual mental fog that I dwell in, but I'm having trouble comprehending what you're saying here. Am I on the end of the lance, or is my client?

And are you saying I should negotiate like a bastard till the client bleeds, and then give them a great mix?


Quote:
3.) It's easiest to keep from crossing daggers over the "Plunder of War" when you have little or nothing to fight about... so consider this phenomenon before you embroil someone you "Love" or "Trust completely" to champion you as a relative(pun intended) unknown. If success in one's career entails the "Collateral damage" of the complete and utter destruction of one's emotional and familial universe... Make sure you are indeed ready to accept that possibility as a "Fair Exchange" for the Western trappings and concepts of "Success". Should you be so lucky/unlucky to achieve such a thing.
And could you define "western trappings" of success...? All I want to do is get paid, not drive a Rolls Royce or anything.

Thanks,

Pete
Old 8th August 2006
  #38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curve Dominant View Post
With all due respect, Jules, I don't see that as an absolute rule.

Many producers have been seriously gutted by "managers" as soon as they hit the charts.

Conversely...it doesn't hurt an up-and-coming producer to form a professional rapport with an established and credible lawyer/manager. Or to get on the bottom rung at a big agency.

That sets up a challenge for the aspiring producer, and the good ones step up.

So by the time it comes to negotiating the deal for the recording that "hits," the professional relationship is already in place with your lawyer/manager.

Just as long as it's all on a project-by-project basis. That's what keeps it honest: When either party can walk at any time.
You are missing my point. It is FAR FAR easier to get the SUSTAINED attention of lawyers, managers and producer management companies - with a recent hit under your belt.

Without that its much harder as you are simply talking about 'future potential' - and all the above types of people have band managers and artists CONSTANTLY bending their ear about the 'future potential' of their act(s) - etc etc. - (it gets wearing dealing with a constant procession of people genuinely believing that the project they are involved with is a gold mine ) A person actually credited for helping create a hit / radio hit / developed a band that every record label wants - will stand tall above all the other wannabes and shine - like a beacon - with the message pinned to their back - THIS PERSON ACTUALLY DID IT - AND IT MIGHT BE A REPEAT TRICK.

So I stick to my guns about what I said about finding a manager.

But I never said a little hustle wasn't a good idea! That too is admired by lawyers, managers and producer management companies - no doubt about it. Just not as much as a hit or music biz 'buzz band', under your wing.

Another thing that could work in your favor is - timing. You might be fortunate to find someone STARTING a producer management company, and get in at the early stages. Here is a Catch 22 - A lot of established producer managers have fully populated stables of producers.. There is often 'no more room at the inn" - unless of course you have a ....



Taking a pause from my sanctimonious scratched record of 'you have to have a hit' for a second - another thing to do is simply appoint a cool young hustler / manager type as your manager - and see how they get on with hustling for you.. Producer management is 'cool' - back in the 90's A&R staff were all leaving record co's to do it.
Old 8th August 2006
  #39
Harmless Wacko
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by knightsy View Post
Mate, maybe it's just the usual mental fog that I dwell in, but I'm having trouble comprehending what you're saying here. Am I on the end of the lance, or is my client?

And are you saying I should negotiate like a bastard till the client bleeds, and then give them a great mix?




And could you define "western trappings" of success...? All I want to do is get paid, not drive a Rolls Royce or anything.

Thanks,

Pete
I'm sorry Pete.

I wrote that on the fly, as one of those 'stream of consciousness' thingies and of course, kicked my own ass on anything approaching lucidity.

Here's what I'm driving at.

If you plan on managing yourself as an AE/RP... you've gotta learn to not only DEVELOP, but SEPARATE a part of yourself as a "businessman". And do it in a fashion which doesn't extinguish the part of you that desperately needs to keep functioning as an "artist/human being". Or chances are... yer gonna have real trouble keeping from failing, or going crazy. This is a skillset often developed only after taking some fairly good drubbings at the hands of guys who already know how to do this stuff. That is... BE BUSINESSMEN.

I suspect it's a tricky undertaking for most folks(sure has been for me), and one that's best addressed with a good dose of humor every now and Zen. Business requires COMPETITION... and the whole concept of "competition"(speaking for myself here) feels TOTALLY SCREWED to the "Artist type" as often as not.

So ya kinda DON'T WANT to learn how to do it... but know that SOMETHINGS gotta happen on that front or yer doomed.

I think, in many cases, this is the main reason cats seek out a manager.

They are "creeped out" by the business thing... and they don't wanna allocate the life force it's gonna suck down, to "Put on their hustle on" in the business world. This is because they ALREADY feel like they're in a losing race against mortality just attempting to complete what they wish to accomplish as an creative entity in the art world, before somebody whips them in a wooden box and starts tossing dirt over them.

So.. if ya go that "Self Management" route yourself, or ya hornswoggle a wife, family member, or just somebody ya actually love in the 'Real World'(as opposed to the Music World) into doing it FOR you... Don't be amazed if you see some really rough highway in the course of your music business travels.

Damned if ya do, damned if ya don't.... The whole Catch-22 thing.

Hope this was a clearer version of my earlier post!!!!

Best regards m8!!!

SM.
Old 8th August 2006
  #40
Harmless Wacko
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennR01 View Post
Ex-Manager Haiku

moving into the meeting
the ponytail takes with him
some discography misrepresentation


This is INSANELY funny on about 3 dozen levels.

Mind you, I feel like stepping in front of a bullet train right now..

But, at least I'll be laughing as I'm turned into strawberry jelly.

SM.
Old 9th August 2006
  #41
Gear Maniac
 

bowing humbly...
Old 9th August 2006
  #42
It doesn't matter who your manager is, you've got to have equal business and mangement skills.

Or maybe I should say regardless of who your manager is, you can't really count on business delas beyond your skill level happening. You need to montito them as well as give them ideas. They may execute things, but they neither work for you nor do you work for them. Brauer phrsed it best when he said "they're part of your team."


I treied to do a deal with a friend of mine, who's a producer with a known manager. Our deal never went through because we never agreed on terms and in the end i was really pissed with the manager. I kept saying one key thing in blatantly celar terms and he kept replying with the terms changed. I never figured out whether that was intentional or not. That's sort of an aside, but it created my first bad impression.

Since the deal was party speculative, i asked who would owned the masters if plan A didn't work and he said he didn't know. That was the moment I knew he'd never be my manager, because I knew precisely who would own them. There wasn't any realization that his client would be a significant part owner, and ultimately the deal he was asking for was a pretty weak deal for his client and could have been far better with minimal effort and requests for things that everyone would have agreed to.

My friend is not going to change managers, but he's not getting the best advice possible and part of that is because he's not thinking enough for himself. He's a smart guy and knows what he needs to know.


Most people don't want a manger, the want an agent, and there really is no such thing for producers and engineers. In fact, so I've been told, in NY State it's illegal to call yourself an agent in certain contexts.
Old 9th August 2006
  #43
Lives for gear
 
Curve Dominant's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules View Post
You are missing my point. It is FAR FAR easier to get the SUSTAINED attention of lawyers, managers and producer management companies - with a recent hit under your belt.

Without that its much harder as you are simply talking about 'future potential' - and all the above types of people have band managers and artists CONSTANTLY bending their ear about the 'future potential' of their act(s) - etc etc. - (it gets wearing dealing with a constant procession of people genuinely believing that the project they are involved with is a gold mine ) A person actually credited for helping create a hit / radio hit / developed a band that every record label wants - will stand tall above all the other wannabes and shine - like a beacon - with the message pinned to their back - THIS PERSON ACTUALLY DID IT - AND IT MIGHT BE A REPEAT TRICK.

So I stick to my guns about what I said about finding a manager.

But I never said a little hustle wasn't a good idea! That too is admired by lawyers, managers and producer management companies - no doubt about it. Just not as much as a hit or music biz 'buzz band', under your wing.

Another thing that could work in your favor is - timing. You might be fortunate to find someone STARTING a producer management company, and get in at the early stages. Here is a Catch 22 - A lot of established producer managers have fully populated stables of producers.. There is often 'no more room at the inn" - unless of course you have a ....



Taking a pause from my sanctimonious scratched record of 'you have to have a hit' for a second - another thing to do is simply appoint a cool young hustler / manager type as your manager - and see how they get on with hustling for you.. Producer management is 'cool' - back in the 90's A&R staff were all leaving record co's to do it.
All points well taken, Jules.
Old 9th August 2006
  #44
Lives for gear
 
Curve Dominant's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by djui5 View Post
There is one exception, if you know someone.
Exactly.

We are in the communication business after all, and getting to know "someone" is a matter of communication.
Old 9th August 2006
  #45
Led
Lives for gear
 
Led's Avatar
Have you ever seen 3 or 4 of them together in the same room...... ah kill me.
Old 14th August 2006
  #46
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poncival's Avatar
Thanks for the insights, everybody. I think I will stick with the status quo right now which involves two beautiful studios and a very close-knit staff including two main engineers and an insanely dedicated studio manager who gets us a pretty steady stream of gigs coming into the studio. Unfortunately, sometimes, especially when talking with my wife, it's hard not to feel like the studio owner will always have the best interests of the studio in mind and not necesarily be eager to offer pay raises or benefits, etc. I am very realistic and am not expecting to be handed anything on a silver platter and I am a big believer in the idea that the only way to get anywhere in this business is to relentlessly bust your ass for many, many, years with hundreds of clients and to constantly sharpen your skills and step your game up. But as I continue along this path it seems like a good idea to keep my eyes open for bigger and better things to come lest I wake up one day finding myself under the proverbial glass ceiling and realizing that I have missed out on opportunities for advancement that I would have found out about had I had someone out there scouting them out for me. For example, it's hard to be on the phone bugging people about getting me into the studio with Willie Nelson or Ozzy Osbourne when I am in the studio all day with groups that I don't necessarily have a choice whether or not I will be working with them... Well I guess this is turning into more of a "moan zone" piece because it all pretty much boils down to my impatience with the endless grind which doesn't always necessarily mean I am satisfied with my work at the end of the day (working with drummers who can't keep time etc) and my desire to be rich and famous with no more space on my walls for platinum records... With all this in mind I must say I am so thankful for the opportunities I do have to work with amazingly talented people on some of the finest recording equipment there is, and to be successfully paying my bills and even buying a few beers once in a while with the money I make from recording is a miracle, I am sure. It's just that I keep thinking I had better do SOMETHING or 20 years from now I am going to be working at the same studio at the same rate with the same BS going on all the time and still worrying about whether I will get the mortgage paid on time... Let me guess, I am not the only person whose mind this has crossed...

Thanks again
John
Old 15th August 2006
  #47
Quote:
Originally Posted by poncival View Post
Thanks for the insights, everybody. I think I will stick with the status quo right now which involves two beautiful studios and a very close-knit staff including two main engineers and an insanely dedicated studio manager who gets us a pretty steady stream of gigs coming into the studio. Unfortunately, sometimes, especially when talking with my wife, it's hard not to feel like the studio owner will always have the best interests of the studio in mind and not necesarily be eager to offer pay raises or benefits, etc.




It's just that I keep thinking I had better do SOMETHING or 20 years from now I am going to be working at the same studio at the same rate with the same BS going on all the time and still worrying about whether I will get the mortgage paid on time... Let me guess, I am not the only person whose mind this has crossed...

Thanks again
John
I'd say it's a 100% certianty that the studio owner will always put his interestes and the studio's interests ahead of yours. It's not a comment about him as a person, he has to. Especailly if you think he has an obligation to his employees to stay in business.


As far as 20 years down the road, what makes you think anyone will be doing anything more in recording than you're doing now?

Can you name any new artist since 2000 who's put out an album every year and had at least three different ones go platinum?

Can you name new artist on a major label that's put out 5 original albums (not live or greatest hits) since 2000?

And if you can, now split that list among the top 5 or 10 guys and even if you include yourself, how much work is that?

So, I htink there is a good chance you be in a similar position unless you change your personal business model - which you can do without a manager.
Old 2nd June 2007
  #48
RAH
Gear Maniac
 

sorry to bring this thread back to life again but i was interested in what you had to say Jules...

...I've recently been getting some attention off a few fairly large producer management companies. I'm young, have a few decent production credits and am very on the ball when it comes to new bands.... If they're good....i find them.....and i find them early! Which leads me to my problem (which sounds similar to one you've experienced). I'm pretty keen on the idea of getting a manager, someone to deal with the biz side of things deal with all the bull**** that i have no interest in, chase money, negotiate bigger rates, points, writting %ages yada yada yada. But i'm concerned that i could end up being used as a young A&R bitch for their bigger producers so the managers can get me to do the leg work and then get a bigger cut by using one of their big boys. Is it likely that this is what they'll do?dfegad

cheers

RAH
Old 2nd June 2007
  #49
Hmmmm..

Here is the scenario where your manager might find it hard to keep solidarity with you 100%.

New band - "hey thats great you have a new upcoming producer interested in working with us! By the way, who else do you manage?"

Your manager then says - Mr x Mr y Ms Z (all frontline hit producers)

New band - "Wow! You manage Mr x? AMAZING! We would LOVE to work with him! Is there any way you can get our demo to him?"

And then... it can be all over..

The new band has forgotten about you in a 'New York minute'



I have come to the conclusion that a young producer doing all the leg work talent spotting in clubs WILL get used as a 'hunting dog' for the bigger producers who are chained to their mixing boards and dont know whats going on out on the street
Old 2nd June 2007
  #50
RAH
Gear Maniac
 

YEP YEP YEP.....

Catch 22 eH??

Would they not want to keep me sweet tho considering if that happens i would just stop bringing the bands/ work and in the longterm would move on to someone that worked better for me? Is it worth bringing up these concerns quite directly with them or could that just make me look like im accusing them of being dicks before we've even started a relationship?

RAH
Old 2nd June 2007
  #51
You cant blame ambitious bands wanting to get to the 'hit makers'

And you cant force the manager to sit on their hands and keep who they represent a secret.

Yes catch 22

I remember going in and meeting a producer manager when I was thinking of switching managers, after I spent half an hour telling them of my unhappiness with my existing manager, I looked up at the wall and saw their roster of producers, (they had about front line, very busy rock band producers and thought...oh sh!t.. these guys are nabbing bands off me pretty frequently...er...) In the end all I had done is 'entertain' the person I met with...

As an alternative to joining a stable of established producers, you could perhaps join a stable of up and coming producers, then upgrade later....?

Work your way up.. ?

If you are managed by someone that represents 1 x new hip hop producer, 1 x new dance producer and you are the new 'rock band' guy in the stable, then there is no conflict..

Just a suggestion...

If I can pass anything on, its REALLY study the existing producer roster FIRST before even opening your mouth.

Yes, it can work the other way, some of the big hitters can be simply too busy or dealing only with superstar acts to work with the new bands and the producer management co might be able to throw you a bone once in a while.. "Rick Rubin is too busy, but we DO have this new kid.... "etc.. but I wouldn't hold your breath waiting.

Here in London, UK some producer management companies AND some music business lawyers hire hip, young talent scouts - to get out there and sniff out the acts likely to get signed and therefore likely to have a big bag of cash to spend on recording or on legal fees for their record deal... They are usually good looking kids in their early 20's (same as the junior A&R scouts for the labels) .
Old 2nd June 2007
  #52
Captain
 
Mike Shipley's Avatar
 

Well , I guess I'm the only one here who likes or get's sage advice from their managers . I"m managed by" Nettwerk" and I've got nothing but positive things to say about them , their way of working and how they help me , even tho the bulk of my work comes from clients who seek me out is great.
To know which band I mix is gonna have the label behind them , money behind them , to which band to do that I might normally not see the right potential of , because I;m in the middle of mixing a record of a complete different genre , and have tunnel vision cos of the record I'm currently mixing , to talking constantly with someone who really knows the reality of how the business is changing and to keep up with what is going on at each label , you gotta have someone with constant inside knowledge or it's so easy to think you are doing just fine , but in fact , don't have your name in the charts , and are busting your ass mixing a band that really has no real "set up" and everyone is just hoping it's good and gonna "happen" , of course there are never ANY garauntees , but why am I gonna mix a record , no matter how good , that has no support no real [email protected] I can't get that information , but my manager spends her day fact finding that stuff.
Pass on that , these days , I wanna know , and so does my manager , what the upsde is , and it's not about money , its about a career and guidance and not just saying yes to every gig.
I know it's a long rant , but for me, having Nettwerk's help is so worth the money , it makes my life easy in organizing my gigs.
Peace
Shipshape
Old 3rd June 2007
  #53
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jayfrigo View Post
Anybody actually have a positive story about producer/engineer management, or about a worthwhile individual? And just to satisfy curiosity, who are the major players in this racket... er, service?
I do.
I was picked up by an upstart manager from NYC in 91 named Greg Spotts.
He was instrumental in securing work and finding avenues for my then talent as a remixer (remember those days?). He was definately the turning point for me.
Since then we have both gone our seperate ways. I got more into songwriting and started a band that had a stint with sony and he has gone on to make political documentaries, started the shorlist awards (awards for great artists that have sold less than 500,000 copies) and is now heading into politics. Since he and I parted ways I have seen and worked with alot of managers and I can say that none have matched his knowledge, savvy or most importantly (for me at least) integrity.
Old 3rd June 2007
  #54
RAH
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules View Post
You cant blame ambitious bands wanting to get to the 'hit makers'

And you cant force the manager to sit on their hands and keep who they represent a secret.

Yes catch 22

I remember going in and meeting a producer manager when I was thinking of switching managers, after I spent half an hour telling them of my unhappiness with my existing manager, I looked up at the wall and saw their roster of producers, (they had about front line, very busy rock band producers and thought...oh sh!t.. these guys are nabbing bands off me pretty frequently...er...) In the end all I had done is 'entertain' the person I met with...

As an alternative to joining a stable of established producers, you could perhaps join a stable of up and coming producers, then upgrade later....?

Work your way up.. ?

If you are managed by someone that represents 1 x new hip hop producer, 1 x new dance producer and you are the new 'rock band' guy in the stable, then there is no conflict..

Just a suggestion...

If I can pass anything on, its REALLY study the existing producer roster FIRST before even opening your mouth.

Yes, it can work the other way, some of the big hitters can be simply too busy or dealing only with superstar acts to work with the new bands and the producer management co might be able to throw you a bone once in a while.. "Rick Rubin is too busy, but we DO have this new kid.... "etc.. but I wouldn't hold your breath waiting.

Here in London, UK some producer management companies AND some music business lawyers hire hip, young talent scouts - to get out there and sniff out the acts likely to get signed and therefore likely to have a big bag of cash to spend on recording or on legal fees for their record deal... They are usually good looking kids in their early 20's (same as the junior A&R scouts for the labels) .
Yea i'm based in the UK too so were probably talking about some of the same companies. Your right bands can't be expected not to get excited about the big hitters which is the real dilema. The way i've started to see it tho is that sitting alongside these guys on the roster must put me in a better position that not being? At the end of the day if a bands going to go to a bigboy they're going to go to a bigboy regardless of weather i'm sat next to them or not. The way i see it, as a young producer you have to get a 'connection' with the band that they feel they need for the record. And helping the bands develop/ write in the rehersal room as well as in the studio is really the only power you have to keep them from going to the name when the time comes...

I suppose its worth giving it a go?!

RAH
Old 3rd June 2007
  #55
Lives for gear
For the Producer/engineers under management with their own studios, I have a question: How do you bill the client for the studio time? I don’t mean logistically; obviously you do it just like anyone else. But part of the point of having a manager is so that you can always be the “nice” cop who just wants to have fun on the project not thinking about money. Your manager bashes them about the money so you don’t have to. But if you charge for your studio and your manager doesn’t take a piece of that action, how do you navigate that situation while maintaining the whole “talk to my manager about money” stuff.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>
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Currently I don’t charge for my studio; it’s ‘free’ bonus for the client. Thus far, from a marketing perspective I think it makes things a little easier. But at the same time, I don’t have an SSL so we aren only talking about maybe $600-800/song that would be billed for “studio time”. It also means I don’t have to worry about the hospitality side of my studio because nobody expects it, and I find clients are more considerate of the place (ie. “don’t piss me off or screw around in here or I’ll make you book time in another studio”). This is really important as it’s located in my home. But as I’m soon relocating and pimping out tha studizzo a little bit, it’s something I’m thinking about. What could potentially make it a little harder to navigate for me is that right now clients pay me directly. My manager says “it’s time to pay” and he gives them bank routing info, but it goes to my account. Or they pay with checks or whatever and they are made out to me (and I cut a check to my manager for his take). So it would seem a little bizarre to do that and then tell them to write ANOTHER check made out to me for the studio.<o:p></o:p>
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So how do ya’ll handle it? Especially the folks with home studios.<o:p></o:p>
Old 4th June 2007
  #56
Gear Addict
 
Thebassist's Avatar
 

Ditto on Waegner's comments. Typical conversation:

Me: So how did you hear about my work?
Client: I was hanging out with X band listening to their disc and I said wow that sounds good, who did it?

Not only free advertising, but better. I got *payed* for it!

Make albums that matter. The new mantra.
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