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Help setting up my studio
Old 19th February 2009
  #1
Here for the gear
Help setting up my studio

I used my military bonus to pick up some recording gear. I have recording in several studios, but only playing bass for R&B, POP and RAP artist.

I got a bonus from the Army and got this set up. MICROPHONE
ST77, PRE AMP AVALON M5, LEXICON 3000, MOTU ULTRA LITE MK3, COMPRESSOR DBX 166 XL, COMPUTER RUNNING WINDOWS VISTA 64 BIT.
MY RECORDING SOFTWARE IS ADOBE AUDITION 1.5. Speaker Monitors M-Audio 5's. Someone gave me a disk with waves software on it. I think that's pretty popular?

I can't get the sound I want guys. The recordings are too low and when I turn them up they clip pretty bad. I bought this combination of gear because most of it was in the studios I played bass in. I'm trying to record R&B POP STYLE MUSIC.

Did i go totally wrong with my set up? If so, what changes should I make? If the set up is good...please advise me of some good settings. I'm new to recording, but I am very eager to learn and be advised by lots of you experienced folks.

I hope you'll respond

MARK
Old 19th February 2009
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lemark View Post
The recordings are too low and when I turn them up they clip pretty bad.
If you are comparing your stuff to commercial disks, I think its fair to guess that one big thing you are missing the mastering process. (Final compression, EQ, limiting, etc.)

If you didn't pay for the Waves software, destroy the disk, uninstall it, and don't steal software ever again. If you did, then good, because they are good plug-ins.

Its near impossible to recommend settings on your gear for your music without hearing anything. Most people here will tell you something along the lines of "turn the knobs until they are in the place that sounds the best" (and that is the truth). Practicing mixing and listening will only make you better.

If you post some material, perhaps I/we can give some more specific suggestions.
Old 19th February 2009
  #3
Here for the gear
I will post some of my recordings

Thanks for responding, i think its probably the mixing lol. I have no clue with that stuff. The guys studios I played at dont seem to motivated to help me progress. I guess that's how some guys are gonna act though when you branch away from them. I haven't even installed that waves software yet...but a drummer I played with gave it to me. I know what you mean about the software thing though, people do steal and sell it. I bought a reasons nnxt disc off ebay and it was fake...its crazy. I guess after I post something...i can possibly get some advise on compression. I think what is missing is having the entire completed mix to sound like its all coming from the same sources...even though most of my keyboard stuff is from midi, reasons.

I think I have the proper set up..but I am willing to ship something out and ship something else in if need be. I really would like to start on an all musical album featuring some nice pop/r&b vocalist I know.

Thanks for any and ever tip...im out with my pen and pad. I'm still a rook.
Old 19th February 2009
  #4
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dpianomn's Avatar
 

smithcok is right, the final step in the recording process is called 'mastering'...it ensures that the tracks are all of a similar volume and tone, and that the disc is within an acceptable volume range for commercial release. if you end up recording anything you'd like to release, you REALLY should not skip this step.

by the way, thank you for service!!
Old 19th February 2009
  #5
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Aaron Miller's Avatar
If your new to recording tweakheadz.com is a good place to start.
Old 19th February 2009
  #6
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close/far's Avatar
 

I think a good place to start is by reading the manuals to the gear that you purchased, and whenever you come across a word, phrase, or symbol that you don't know, research it until you understand. There is more than enough information out there for the adequately motivated. Or if you have the patience and courage, when you strike upon a question about the basics, search the forums here at Gearslutz, and then make your own thread if you still haven't answered it on your own. Good luck with that last one.
Old 19th February 2009
  #7
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Yeah, best thing to do is to post something (even, gasp!, and mp3) and let the gearslutz listen in.

We can all pitch in suggestions and more specifics to help.

When recording in studios as the artist, the engineer will likely not be really concerned with teaching you about the craft, as it is his/her job to make you sound good. However, being an intern at a studio will give you an insider's edge to the processes (plus other fun things like making coffee and taking out the trash).
Old 19th February 2009
  #8
Gear Head
 
Tomic's Avatar
 

i dont think its fair to start babling about mastering just yet...
in my book one should first get the recording part right (proper gain etc.)
then the mixing part and so on...all im saying is that a recording "should sound good" BEFORE mastring as well.....
Old 19th February 2009
  #9
I'd put the disk of waves cracks in the vin (yes they're good plugins; no you've not got legal versions) and get a book on home recording basics, or get someone in your home area to help you get started (ie pay a pro for half a day). Chances are there's several things wrong with how you've set things up that really need someone in attendance to sort out.
Old 20th February 2009
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomic View Post
i dont think its fair to start babling about mastering just yet...all im saying is that a recording "should sound good" BEFORE mastring as well.....
Right, I was specifically referring to the OP's reference to volume, and I did try to specify "one" thing. Then we suggested that he post his songs so that we can help on the mix/production value.

Knowing that there is another process between mixing and commercial CD is a good piece of information.
Old 20th February 2009
  #11
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GZsound's Avatar
I don't think there is any substitute for "time in grade" when it comes to making quality recordings.

The easiest answer is to just practice your craft. Over and over and over.

Get CD's of your favorite music and listen to them. Try to duplicate what you hear on them with your equipment. There is no "easy" button to push and you appear to have enough equipment to do a good job.

Good ears, a good room and decent equipment go a long way towards getting the results you want, but there is no substitute for spending the thousand hours it takes to learn.
Old 6th March 2009
  #12
Gear Head
 
Tomic's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GZsound View Post
I don't think there is any substitute for "time in grade" when it comes to making quality recordings.

The easiest answer is to just practice your craft. Over and over and over.

Get CD's of your favorite music and listen to them. Try to duplicate what you hear on them with your equipment. There is no "easy" button to push and you appear to have enough equipment to do a good job.

Good ears, a good room and decent equipment go a long way towards getting the results you want, but there is no substitute for spending the thousand hours it takes to learn.
Amen
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