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Need Help : Avalon VT737sp
Old 4th July 2005
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
joseph's Avatar
Need Help : Avalon VT737sp

Dear All Gurus,
I'm Using PTools HD3 with 192 I/O, Control 24, few pre Amps including Avalon VT737sp directly to 192 I/O.
I often using VT737 for Snare with SM57 mic, and I found the level in VT's VU meter read about -20 to -15db below 0db but it read almost 0dbfs in ptools track meter. Sometimes clip when reach -15db in VT's VU meter.
But When I use VT for Vocals with AKG C12VR or CAD VX2 tube Mic, I often have to push the gain/master level in VT to reach above 0 VU but I'm still hear not too hot/solid in ptools, the meter in ptools also read about -15 to -15dbfs. But I can't go further with VT gain because it'll sound distorted to me and noisy.
Should I bring the VT to Service Center? Or Should I go to an audio school to solve this kind of problem?
Old 4th July 2005
  #2
BMT
Gear Head
 
BMT's Avatar
 

It's what you hear...

not what you see! The meters in P.T. are what you go by. If the meters in P.T. are good then everything is ok, but don't clip them. If I were you I'd go to audio school if you are serious about a career in audio. I went to Full Sail. Check out www.fullsail.com GOOD LUCK!!!
Old 4th July 2005
  #3
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
There are several possible answers to this.

1) Are all of your meters calibrated? To what reference levels?

2) You're talking about peak vs. average levels and there's a wild difference there. A typical PPM (digital) meter will show the highest peak from all transients while a typical VU meter has much slower ballistics and will show you average levels. If your looking at a source with super fast transients like a snare drum or other percussion...the difference in level could be 10dB or better.

3) You could be running out of headroom in the analog domain and that could be because the 737 is in need of repair or is working fine but doesn't have enough headroom. Maybe the AD converters are running out of steam and need to be calibrated or there's some kind of level/impedance mismatch...or any combination of the above.

4) IMHO, audio skoolz are for chumps. They turn out more grads then there are jobs and most of the grads I've encountered can't mix a drink let alone audio. If you want to learn about this stuff get some books and start learning about the theory. There's more to it then plugging some wires together and turning some knobs. Find an audio engineer who's local and can teach you. Record everything you can...report back in about five years.

It took me about that long to start to grasp it.
Old 4th July 2005
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
joseph's Avatar
Thanks for answers,
Pro Tools have A & B Trim Gain Setting in Hardware Prefereces, I Took a test with calibration file include in Ptools CD, Signal generator generate Sine Wave -18dbfs and read in VU meter (dk audio and VT's meter) about -1 db. and when it routed back to ptools input, read -18dbfs. I route an Aux track with signal generator plugged in to 192's output to VT's Line Input and copy the 192 output to dk audio meters.
Yes right, I feel (hear) I'm loosing Headroom when I tracking vocal thru VT even the VU meters read far below 0db, but I feel (hear) have no headroom when I tracking perkusive and fast transient things.
Should I re calibrate the 192 I/O? Can friend here help me with best method?
Old 4th July 2005
  #5
Lives for gear
 
hociman's Avatar
 

RTFM

Quote:
Originally Posted by joseph
Should I re calibrate the 192 I/O? Can friend here help me with best method?
It wouldn't hurt to recalibrate it. Be sure to read the Pro Tools Reference Guide when doing this so that its done properly.
Old 5th July 2005
  #6
Lives for gear
 
DeeDrive's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Kahrs
4) IMHO, audio skoolz are for chumps. They turn out more grads then there are jobs and most of the grads I've encountered can't mix a drink let alone audio. If you want to learn about this stuff get some books and start learning about the theory. There's more to it then plugging some wires together and turning some knobs. Find an audio engineer who's local and can teach you. Record everything you can...report back in about five years.
I totally agree. I've got a stack of books I learned almost all of my technical knowledge from. Everything from audio theory to acoustics to electronics. Even a triginomety book will help you learn more about periodic motion and waveforms.
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