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Noobie pianist
Old 7th February 2009
  #1
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skiroy's Avatar
 

Noobie pianist

Okay guys I promise you this is my last dumb noobie question in regards to progressions.Im new to music in general.When it comes to the technical stuff and mixing I think I have what it takes but I really need to step it up when it comes to music and I have been practicing piano for about 4months. Im taking lessons and practicing scales out of the "brown scale book". At the ned of each scale lesson it gives you the basic I IV V chords. Theay are consistantly I in first inversion, IV in the Root position and the V in second inversion.

My question is if this is a commonalty as far as inversions go with this chords in your progression. I was told in theory class that all progression are based around the I IV V chords and everything else is the icing.

I was also taught that the vi chord is often only inverted when going to the ii and that a diminished chord is often play in the first inversion,but this may only be in classic tonal music.

I was just wondering what your opinion on these perspectives and if they hold any value in todays music.
Old 7th February 2009
  #2
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skiroy's Avatar
 

I know this is a rediculous question and it kinda of is to me as well,but Im trying to practice scales and their chords.I can figure out the chords in their root position but Im pretty sure from watching others play this is not done very often,so Im trying to wrap my head around some kinda of groundwork to start from when practicing so I can then go from there to break the rules and create.But I need to do basics first. What is your advice for a beginner trying to learn scales and there chords? Are there any chords in the scale that are commonly inverted a certain way in regards to simple "kiddy triad progressions"?

I know on scale books they always give you the 1-4-5 and they are usually inverted the same way. Im just trying to see if these inversion are consistent with those chords in modern music?
Old 7th February 2009
  #3
Gear Head
 
grhuntuk's Avatar
 

Learn your intervals, and circle of fifth's.
Old 7th February 2009
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
maxhype's Avatar
Keyboard inversions vary in different genres of modern music. Jazz inversions are less likely to be in root position since it is usually the bass who is covering the root and the doubled root sound is not desirable in that genre. However in rock it's more likely that chords will be in root position to double the bass or hold down an 'anchor', sometimes in blues as well, though blues can cross over to jazz voicings.

Keep in mind that you might be playing an 'inverted' chord in the right hand, but it's not really the case since your left hand may be covering the root in its bass note.

I IV V is pretty standard for rock but sophisticated music of any genre (including rock) makes use of alternate chords, subdominants, modes and all kind of imagination...

A good approach is to study classical theory for the basics and then additionally study the genres you wish to play and the music of keyboardists whose sound you like.
Old 7th February 2009
  #5
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fhames's Avatar
 

Find recordings you like and analyze the changes. Learn the song and play along. Repeat
Old 7th February 2009
  #6
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ericdisero's Avatar
 

Voice leading is the most important element with regards to your questions on inversions. Don't make more work for yourself than you need. This applies to any progression, not just I, IV, V, I. Those inversions you listed on your first post are a good start.
Old 7th February 2009
  #7
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skiroy's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fhames View Post
Find recordings you like and analyze the changes. Learn the song and play along. Repeat
Im just not at that point yet.So as a good practice I should get to know the scale,then the chords in that scale, and then follow the circle of fifths in and invert the chords in such a way that my hand moves as minimal as possible.
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