The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
Snare secrets
Old 13th February 2007
  #91
Lives for gear
 

Great snare secrets Tom! I'll try that next time!

Check this one out, might help someone:

Copy the snare onto an adjacent track. Now distort it. This can be done many ways. A guitar plugin for instance on the high gain amp setting is cool. You can also go old school and use an 1176 and just turn everything to the right. You basically want it to sound dirty with tons of harmonics. Now eq that to add some mids and highs and mix it in with the original snare to give it a big fat crisp sound.
Old 13th February 2007
  #92
Gear Addict
 
bassman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveC View Post
Ehhr..right, use it as a rule or a creative guideline?
Please don't tell me that you always tune the snare in the key of the song...
that's a bit boring.
Hell yes. This is a big deal. You want ring? You want open? It must be in tune just like any other freekin instrument in the mix if its going to sound good. With that logic, the guitars shouldn't be in tune, that would be boring.....

Now, it could be the tonic, a fifth, perhaps a fourth, even a second works depending on the pulse and chords in the tune. Of course a song can change keys in various sections but its nice to have the snare in a place of rest harmonically say in the chorus, ( or in a place of dissonance depending on the vibe ). Also, you might be tuning a harmonic of the head to the song instead of the shell fundamental. This is OK so long as it sounds good to you. Just take the time to do it.

Don't underestimate this. Its a bitch to do right though, tuning after each take etc.... Samples make it easy. Just tune em up and roll with it....

-ashley
Old 16th February 2007
  #93
Lives for gear
 
drumzealot's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joemeekfreak View Post
The year doesn't have anything to do with it, nor should it. If this is a recording/music forum, then that's what should be discussed...if it were a forum for crude jokes, then I would expect those sorts of things when coming to the site (and I wouldnt come here any longer if that were the case) but its suppose to be a music/recording forum, and that's why I come here....hopefully to learn a few new tricks, or what has worked in the past, etc...I'm not here to read failed attempts at crass jokes.
RELAX and celebrate diversity. You are not going to be morally poisoned by a few crude jokes. I am just as bored with your whining as you are with the jokes. If I wanted to read a bunch of moralistic rebukes I could log in to Focus on the Family's forum. Either go with the flow or go else where.
Old 17th February 2007
  #94
Gear Maniac
 
JohnnyTooLoud's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganglion View Post
I think only Kris mentioned something of the sort, but aside from the obvious (great player, great kit, great room) I find the two most important things are the overheads and the room(s) mics. Take any "classic" drum sound and I guarantee there wasn't a snare mic 1" off of the snare. And I'm not talking about Korn or Switchfoot. Of course I still mic the top and bottom to mix in, but most of my snare sound comes from the OHs and room mics

And... the arrangement. If you are doing a modern rock track and there's a gazillion guitar overdubs, try muting some of them. Or mute the bass in a section. I love pro tools more than anyone but its so easy to abuse the number of tracks recorded. Your snare will sound so much better.
I agree - even doing harder-edged stuff I rely on the OH a lot.

The top snare track will get mugged with EQ and Limiting into nothing more than a sharp attack. The bottom snare gets equally abused and gated off the top. Together those two brutalized tracks will sound like almighty poop. But throw in the untouched overheads and some room mic and you have a snare sound that'll drop panties to the floor.

Gotta have a great snare in the overheads.

--Giovanni
Old 18th February 2007
  #95
Lives for gear
 
stagefright13's Avatar
 

There is always the tried and tested Marlboro trick. Just lay a marlboro hardpack box filled with nails on the head and hold it to the rim with 1 strip of duct tape. Adjust nails for correct ballistics so you don't overshoot target. Most recent album I know of using this vintage technology was Jet's first album...

Not really a secret but makes a cool snare for rock.
Old 18th February 2007
  #96
Lives for gear
 
Berolzheimer's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by not_so_new View Post
Really?
I just got a copy of Bang's samples and they are TOP notch! GREAT sounding samples. So you are saying that if I use them on my productions my mixes will sound like all the others on his site too? Just because the snare is leaning in the same direction sonically?

I highly doubt it.

Also there are many many ways to use samples in a mix. For instance, I rarely use a sample straight up as a replacement, it is often blended with the real drums or used as a way to drive ambiance.

Anyway the idea that my mixes have to suffer because it is somehow "wrong" to use a tool that would make them better is crazy. I don't use samples on every mix but if a sample makes my mix better why wouldn't I use it? Because of my pride? I am not going to make my clients pay for my pride or to increase my own self worth in my own mind.

My goal is better mixes and like it or not, in today's hyper real release market if I don't use samples I risk not standing up to the big mixes (made by guys who don't care one way or the other about using samples).
Actually, I think his drums generally sound pretty good, they have a nice punch. Not really my cup of tea but good for what they are. But the mixes- well, personally I like the music I listen to to have some artistry, musically and sonically, and to me art isn't doing the same thing over & over again, it's about experimentation & creating something new or interesting each time. To me his mixes sound very formulaic.
I'm not against using samples either, there's a place for just about anything & everything. I usually prefer to use the real recorded track when I can, I like to hear all the nuance of the performance and any samples added wll mask some of that. That said sometimes I get tracks to mix that are poorly recorded and just need help and the priority is making the song work as well as possible, so if it takes adding samples to do that so be it.
Old 18th February 2007
  #97
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flora View Post
I ALWAYS change the strings on my snare before a session!

"Rule 2: tune it in open E, G, B whatever's the key of the song."

Yes, and I prefer tuning to open E, as it makes slide work much easier.
Old 18th February 2007
  #98
Lives for gear
 
Mozart's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Produceher View Post

When the snare sounds good when I hit it, than I mic it. Not before.

Good Luck.
You mean: "When the drummer hit it" right, not you (engineer)?
There is a HUGE difference WHO is hitting the snare, don't you agree?

I usually start with the overheads trying to get good overall sound and good crack of the snare try them. Then start adding close mcs; Kick in, Kick out (or speaker), check the phase, snare top, check the phase with OH with no Kick, then with kick, Snare Bottom, check the phase again with all together, move the mic if there is a problem, (or IBP if you're lazy like me sometime ) and so on. Usually no compression at all when tracking. Add the room mics at the end. Great results that way! Of course you need at least average drummer!
I'll say, collect experience and knowledge, learn how your mics and pre’s are working together, do not rely on Good luck!
Old 18th February 2007
  #99
Lives for gear
 
poncival's Avatar
crown cm-700
Old 18th February 2007
  #100
Gear Head
 
ivankilowatt's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bpatural View Post
hit it hard, make sure it's not tuned too high, use a little moon gel, and maybe a little distressor/transient designer for processing...instant punchy snare.
Strong drummers make strong sounds!
Old 18th February 2007
  #101
Gear Head
 

Lighter Touch

I keep reading "hit it hard", like its biblical, but keep in mind, some of the most sought out players are *not* hard hitters. I like attack on the drums, but there is a sweet spot in the amount of hit, cos over so much, you're choking the tone out of the drum. I've gotten some good snare drum sounds by even using HotRods, which allowed more of the tone to come thru, and required a lot less compression, and had the same impact as a drumstick.
Old 18th February 2007
  #102
Lives for gear
 
edvdr76's Avatar
I run my snare through a Yamaha graphic and then compress lightly with either a DBX 165 or an 1176. The graphic really helps me bring out the snap without bringing up unwanted woof from the rest of the drums. I then send all my drum tracks to 2 channels and compress them with a Summit DCL 200. That helps bring up the snare beautifully.
Old 18th February 2007
  #103
Deleted User
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bang View Post
Great snare secrets Tom! I'll try that next time!

Check this one out, might help someone:

Copy the snare onto an adjacent track. Now distort it. This can be done many ways. A guitar plugin for instance on the high gain amp setting is cool. You can also go old school and use an 1176 and just turn everything to the right. You basically want it to sound dirty with tons of harmonics. Now eq that to add some mids and highs and mix it in with the original snare to give it a big fat crisp sound.
You're crazy man. Cool tips and cool samples....that I may just have to buy....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sizzleboy View Post
"Rule 2: tune it in open E, G, B whatever's the key of the song."

Yes, and I prefer tuning to open E, as it makes slide work much easier.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Cymbals View Post
I keep reading "hit it hard", like its biblical, but keep in mind, some of the most sought out players are *not* hard hitters. I like attack on the drums, but there is a sweet spot in the amount of hit, cos over so much, you're choking the tone out of the drum. I've gotten some good snare drum sounds by even using HotRods, which allowed more of the tone to come thru, and required a lot less compression, and had the same impact as a drumstick.
Good point- sometimes its not about hitting the snare hard, but about hitting it consistently. At least with most of the drummers I record, its a lot easier to get them to hit consistently hard than consistently at a more moderate level/stength.
Old 20th February 2007
  #104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cymbals View Post
I keep reading "hit it hard", like its biblical, but keep in mind, some of the most sought out players are *not* hard hitters.
Right on man!!!!!!

I like both approaches (and everything in between).
Sometimes you need to slam the snare, other times play soft centre hits.

I'm sorry a thread about recording (real) snare drums turned into a debate on replacement samples. I guess it depends what kind of music you categorise as 'rock' in order to guage how widespread the practice is. However, I think to champion sample replacement as a positive way forward, is like championing brick wall mastering over dynamics. They are both realities......and that's all.
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump