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1972 Command studios Piccadilly England.What Gear?
Old 29th November 2008
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1972 Command studios Piccadilly England.What Gear?

I heard Command Studios England in 1972 was inside of a theater.Would anyone know the gear that was in there?My guess it was a Studer 16trk 2 inch meets something along the lines of a nice big buttery Neve....or Trident A range or Helios..?.Does anyone have info?

...Thanks a bunch.
Old 4th May 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carlheinz View Post
I heard Command Studios England in 1972 was inside of a theater.Would anyone know the gear that was in there?My guess it was a Studer 16trk 2 inch meets something along the lines of a nice big buttery Neve....or Trident A range or Helios..?.Does anyone have info?

...Thanks a bunch.
Dear Carl,
This article is three time longer so I edited out all of the finance infomation, if you want the complete article I can mail it to you

Best Regards,

Tony.
Tony Arnold (Director)
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Command Studios RIP Part-1

by
John Dwyer
After four years of troubled business, Command Studios finally ceased operations late in 1974. The background to both the setting up and the subsequent activity is not easy to trace and describe clearly, but may prove a cautionary tale.
COMMAND WAS TO have been one of the largest studio complexes in central London. When the company was formed, money was easy to come by, especially for projects in the booming entertainment business, and it is difficult to avoid the conclusion that much of the sorry tale was the result of baffling financial incontinence.
The story ended with 1974 when its equip­ment was sold piecemeal last December.
By the end of the sixties Jacques Levy was no longer associated with Levy studios in Bond Street, which had been bought by CBS, and he wanted to start another studio. Denis Comper had outgrown his studio in Putney and felt he wanted to be involved in something bigger. He and Levy got together and decided to embark on a joint project more ambitious than either could manage separately, and for which Comper said he would try to find a quarter of a million.
John Mosely was brought in at this stage, partly because of his reputation as an engineer. One man I spoke to recalled his first meeting with Mosely, who had come in with a classical recording he had produced: `I was introduced to this bloke who was dressed like a stockbroker -pin-striped suit, the bowler hat and all that business. He had with him a transfer that had been made from a 71 and it was brilliant, it really was. It sounded a lot better than a lot of recordings I'd heard at 15.' But in any case Mosely had a number of rich friends, one of whom was Michael Gampell, a solicitor in the firm of Ashurst, Morris and Crisp and Partners and a renowned tax expert.
other interests were recounted in Diary in the July 1973 issue of Studio Sound.
I have edited the Diary page as most information is the RIP Story
AT THE TIME of writing, Command have almost completed the sale of their studios to as yet unknown buyers. I understand that the price was around £145,000. Whatever it was, it was well above what bidder Monty Babson (who came second) said he thought reasonable considering that the lease had'only another three and a half years to run: it expires on Christmas Day, 1976.
Command's story goes back to 1970. They had just formed and were looking for premises when the BBC decided to close all their outside studios for economic reasons, a process which continues. So Piccadilly One went up for grabs and Command grabbed.
Jacques Levy resigned from Command in February 1971. Around then Command put in quadraphonic equipment: four pan pots on each of the three control desks as well as extra speakers in the control rooms. Each control room was then equipped with a 24J24 Auto­mated Processes desk, an 8/16 track Scully tape machine convertible to 24 tracks, and two Scullys to provide one to four track facilities.
In July 1971, Command secured an overdraft of £10,000 from Barclays Bank, again by mortgaging their assets. This brought their capital to £260,000.
In November, Command opened their Rock Box in the old Studio Three. The idea was that each instrument of a rock group would have virtually infinite separation, yet the musicians could play together in the middle of the studio floor. John Mosely had seen the idea in the United States and had persuaded the other directors that it would be a good idea to con­vert their rehearsal studio. After using the Rock Box, rock musician John Jones described it to STUDIO SOUND as a `great step forward'.
. Those first 18 months, when they were setting up, were almost bound to cause a loss. But business was not as good in the second year as it should have been: because of technical problems such as control room peculiarities and frequent equipment breakdowns according to some sources; a wrong attitude to the recording business on the part of the management according to others.
Command RIP to be Continued
Old 4th May 2009 | Show parent
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Command RIP Continued
For reasons that are not altogether clear they did not buy the place. Next they looked at an art gallery in Piccadilly across the road from the Royal Academy. The plan was to turn it into another Abbey Road Number One but Command realised that the scheme was impracticable. Then, further down Piccadilly, someone saw a sign saying `Recording Studio for Sale'. At the time it seemed an incredible stroke of good fortune.
In the thirties, 201 Piccadilly had been a Lyons restaurant where the trendy set of those times used to collect at tea dances. Then the BBC took the place over and, as the Stagedoor Canteen, during the war years, it was used to broadcast troop shows such as Itmaand the Ben Lyon series. Glenn Miller is said to have made his last broadcast from there. In the fifties it became known as Piccadilly One and the BBC used it for shows from the Dales to Saturday Club.Then the BBC started to close its outside studios and by the time they came to sell Piccadilly One the studio was obsolescent in any case.
For Command the place seemed ideal. The standard of engineering was described to me as `immaculate'. `It was so easy when we went in there; all we had to do was follow the standards that had already been set.' On the ground floor was the large Studio One, 7.3m high with a floor area of 223 mY (2400 sq ft). On the floor below were two studios. Studio Two had an area of 102 Sq Mtrs and Studio Three an area of 84 ml. Between them was a vocal booth which could be used for either studio and which had an area of 13 m$. The two studios were connected by a short corridor next to the booth along which were two double and two single doors. `The isolation was superb,' said someone involved in the project. `You could put a rock group in one studio and a string quartet in the other.' The upper studio, Number One, was a fully equipped theatre with lighting, dimmer panels, tip-up seats and so on. The control room had been built on the balcony and was reached from the studio by a spiral staircase.
Having found the premises they needed, Command was formed as a limited company in April 1970.
The newly-formed company had the lease, which ran for 21 years from Christmas Day 1955, assigned to them by the BBC. The rent was £12 000 a year, plus the cost of various insurances on adjacent properties, and rates were £10 850. The premises cost Command £40 880.
Mosely stresses that he had been out of the recording business for ten years and so had said that, if Levy and Comper would tell him what they wanted, he would do it for them. He was not interested, for various reasons, in becoming an employee of Command, and wanted to continue to devote much of his time to his other interests. Thus Comper specified the layouts and ergonomics of the equipment and Mosely set about the detailed design.
One explanation offered to me for Com­mand's subsequent troubles was that they spent too much on externals and not enough on essentials. Another confirmed this view: `All the gear was bought on the cheap and the place was made to look good'. All the same, accounts for the 18 months to September 30, 1972, three months before the receiver was appointed, show that they spent £129 000 on equipment, and that another £33 000 was paid in fees for the design of that equipment. Comper is emphatic that he received none of these fees, and recalls that they went to an American company called Kitt Associates. Other sources confirm this. `One thing that has always disturbed me is the fact that, as a director, I only found this out at a much later date and then only by accident.' He also says that subsequent efforts to trace Kitt Associates proved fruitless. John Mosely confirmed that the fee went to Kitt Associates and said that it was a way of writing-off profits. I asked him if he could make a little clearer exactly what the transaction involved, to which he said he could, but that he would prefer not to. He said it was not true that he did the design and that someone else got paid for it, but neither was it true that he was paid for the designs. He knew the name Kitt Associates, `but it doesn't concern what you're writing about'. Miller, and API, were also reluctant for any attention to be drawn to Kitt Associates.
The receiver issued a document at one stage in Command's career showing that the maintenance, disc-cutting and classical balance engineer got £2000 a year, two of the balance engineers got £1800 a year, another got £1300 a year, a disc-cutting engineer was paid £1500, a maintenance engineer £1400, two trainee balance engineers £15 and £1Z a week respec­tively. The Chairman of Command received £5750.
Another £34 000 was spent on improving the premises. It is possible to say, with the wisdom of hindsight, that had Command confined their activities to the two lower studios, or even had they opened them first, the story might have been different. Instead they built and re-equipped the studios in numerical order, biggest first.
During the summer of 1970 Mosely built the disc-cutting facility and the copy channel; he was once a senior executive at Scully. Studio One took longer to finish than they had thought it would but, with that working, they were able to open for business on November 2, 1970. Many of their difficulties with the equipment, it seems, began with the desks. The first desk, for Studio One, had arrived during the summer and, because of the difficulty of getting it into the control room, two wires on the jack bay broke and had to be repaired when the desk was in place. But there were such extensive faults apart from this that the desk had almost to be rewired. John Mosely remembers that the second desk arrived in January and was working satisfactorily within a week, and that there were even fewer problems with the third desk, which arrived in March or April. How­ever, an engineer who used the desk contests this, saying that the desks were never right at all: `It wasn't a proper multitrack desk. The desks worked, in a technical sense, but not properly. For example, in Studio Three I once said there was a difference in tone between line in and line out-I could hear it, but I was ignored. Then a year later they discovered that I was right.'
Again, John Mosely recalls and Denis Comper agrees that the initial design of the desk was set out by Comper to be realised by Mosely and built by API. Mosely decided where to buy the equipment. I asked him if it were true that he had visited API in the States before the desks were delivered: `Yes. There were a great many things wrong with the desk and I accept that it was my responsibility.' He added that API had experienced production difficulties.
It appears that these were rectified shortly after; in any case most studios, Mosely said, had similar problems when any equipment first arrived. Each module at Command, with the possible exception of the compressor limiters, worked well to a high specification, but the faults seem to have been the result of less than perfect assembly. The problems he experienced at Command did not prevent him from going to API again to order a desk for Studio Ferber in Paris; according to a reliable source not working at Ferber, the Ferber API desk was plugged in `and literally worked straight away'. It has a great many more facilities on it than the Command desk and it has been admitted that the Command desk was too simply designed for multitrack rock work. One Command engineer has said: `I remember doing a session where I had to use all four outputs, the echo send and the foldback as well'.
The first session at Command was an album by Peter Knight of the music from Catch My Soul, for Polydor. John Mosely engineered. Although some of the takes were eventually used the session was beset with difficulties. One of the most crucial was that the power supplies, which were mounted in the desk, were overheating both themselves and the rest of the electronics. The microphone channels and foldback were affected and, in the end, the power supplies cut out in the middle of a take. According to the minutes of a board meeting held later that month Command feared that that session could make them liable for as much as £1000.
By the time the power supplies were put in a separate rack with a cooling fan, disagree­ments among the directors were beginning to surface. Jacques Levy, who had been managing director, `resigned' from the board in February 1971 for reasons which he still declines to disclose: `Let's just say we didn't see eye to eye'. Whatever the mechanism, it was around then that John Mosely began to take a more active interest in the studios. As has already been said, at first he was brought into Com­mand as a consultant to help set up the studio and then to be called in whenever the others decided he was needed.

It has been said that John Mosely was only interested in doing classical work and was contemptuous of rock musicians: `That's not true. I like working with rock musicians. I'll work with any musician, whether he's a rock musician or anything else, as long as he has a professional attitude to what he's doing-I'm working now with a musician for whom I have nothing but the highest respect, Pete Townshend. As far as the customers at Command were concerned, half the people we got were OK; but the other half ... it is true that we didn't enjoy the best clientele. They'd leave coffee cups on the equipment, and it would be covered in ashes. They just exhibited a complete lack of respect for the medium, that's the only way I can put it.'
Many of his differences with the engineers centered around their tolerance of these conditions. `In the better studios every night some­one comes round and clears up.' At Command, he said, he had to do it himself, and cables were left lying around unwound. `The trouble with the Command people was they regarded it as a job ... the people were all wrong. I would never do it again without knowing the people. They were wished on me.' He also said they were clockwatchers. One reply to all this was: `Isn't every studio the same? I personally was very keen. I'd start at 9 am, which meant arriving well before that, eight or eight-thirty, to set up. I never had a tape op­I had some help later on, but never enough ­and then I might go on till four or five in the morning; this went on for a long, long time. You weren't finished even then, of course, because you had to break it down after the sessions, and then be ready to come in at eight again.'
Technical difficulties, too, persisted. In Studio Two the design of the desks was such that if too many facilities were used at once, on the monitors, for example, the circuits supplying them would overload. The false ceiling in the studios was some feet below the original ceiling and bass was absorbed by the ceiling and the cavity between the two. `The top end didn't stop reverberating,' said an engineer. `It sounded as if you were mixing in a cellar.' Another engineer once thought he was getting a good sound out of Studio Two and then took the tape'over to another studio, and was humiliated by the result when played back in more correct conditions. A third, Denis Comper, who didn't do more than a couple of sessions at Command, told me what it was like on one of them, a speech session for Paul Myers: 'I found myself in the wretched position-you don't know how wretched until you've been in it-of doing a session knowing that I couldn't hear what was going on. I knew the noise from the Piccadilly line was going on to the tape and I couldn't hear it.'
I asked one engineer how, if all these things were true, the BBC had managed: `Well they weren't doing multitrack rock sessions. They're working at low level with no need for separation and no absorption.' Another reasoned that the BBC had been using the studio for a totally different purpose, and had worked in mono. Why were these conditions allowed to persist? John Mosely: `The acoustics were not ideal but I didn't object. Yes, the BBC had used it and we refurbished what the BBC had put in. After all, in the old days of classical recording you couldn't pick and choose the acoustics in which the recording was made-you had to make them in the conditions which you were given.' He thought the acoustics were an excuse, and didn't go along with their being responsible for Command's downfall. `For example I have just made a recording in a studio in the States. The first recording I made there had too much bass and too much top. Next time I went in I allowed for that and changed things accordingly and it's been all right since.'
`We didn't have the right engineers. None of them had a commanding reputation-they had a following, but none that would keep us in business.' Against that must be placed the fact that so many of the engineers who were then at Command have done so well since. `There were bad vibes all round,' said one of them, and insisted that they lost business because of it.
Eventually it was decided that the only way to make a go of the studio was to form their own production company. So Eddie Kennedy, a business associate of Denis Comper's who had a publishing company and some artists, was brought in. Apparently Command gave Kennedy a percentage on whatever business he could bring into the studio and allowed him to give away some free time if necessary to encourage custom, a facility which some avaricious band managers were only too eager to take advantage of.
In July 1971 Command got the overdraft from Barclay's bank. The necessity for this was not, apparently, to build and open the Rock Box, which was launched the following November, but to cover running costs. `People were not paying their bills,' Mosely recalls. The money to build the Rock Box had been allowed for in the original estimate of the amount of money needed for the whole complex. Mosely had seen the Rock Box in the States and had thought it a good way of attracting business. Here again there were problems: the row of `soundproof' booths had a common floor. The drum booth was con­sidered ridiculously small.
The first director's report and accounts covered the period from April 1970 to Septem­ber 1971. The turnover of £116 499 represen­ted only the amount invoiced to customers. There was a trading loss of over £77 000 and a loss of £84 000 could be set off against future taxable profits.
Mosely was made managing director in September 1971. `I then brought in Mrs Wannel, who had worked with me at Pye. He admitted her appointment wasn't popular. 'Miller didn't want her, I know that, but if you ask anybody in this business who has an opinion worth asking she was both liked and respected by all of them, and I wouldn't hesitate to give her the highest recommendation.'
`Hermi Wannel was a nice woman,' was one opinion, `but the trouble with Command was the management was always older people; there were never any young people running it'. Not long afterwards Comper, who had brought Eddie Kennedy into Command, was told that he was responsible to Kennedy; shortly after this he was admitted to hospital suffering from a total nervous collapse.
While Comper was away, Brandt's (who already had someone on the board, Peter Nutting, whose job it was to keep an eye on their investment) sent in John King to shake the company up in the hope that Brandt's might get some of their money back. Changes, King judged, were necessary, and this time it was Mosely and Comper who were under the shadow.
By this time John Mosely had appeared to alter his way of running the studio: `He had
started to bend six months before the end but by then it was too late,' said one of the staff. Another said: `He did realise the mistakes he'd made. There was remorse there, there's no doubt about that: Mosely clearly recalls the moment when he knew the thing had gone wrong: `I admit now that the redecoration was wrong-it was wrong to do it in the same way as the BBC had done it-the consoles were wrong for the job they had to do, the atmos­phere was wrong and the people were wrong. I went to Midem in January 1972 and it was there that I got the message. I realised we had gone about it totally the wrong way. When I came back I wrote a memo, which I still have ... in which I detailed everything wrong with the studio. I made a list of things which would have to be put right before the studio had a hope of success. They turned me down.' In February he gathered the staff together and said goodbye.
He started another studio in Paris not long after: `I did to the letter what I said they ought to have done and, I'm not telling you the figures, but the business we did last year was astronomic. In Paris their standards are so much higher, the people are so much more dedicated-it's like a kind of club.' He has also formed closer links with Sansui and has involved himself in film work. About Com­mand he said: `I don't know if you've discovered this but few things work out in life the way you'd like them to'.
Comper's job at Command was to sell studio time, a function in which, it is not too surprising to relate considering the quality of what he had to sell, he was less than successful. `A great guy,' said one engineer, `but I think some of the friction should have been kept under wraps'. Another said he thought he would have done very well at production as he had been doing at Polydor: `It may be that promotion and publicity didn't suit him. He didn't do very well at it'
Around this time technical changes were made. The Altec speakers were replaced by Lockwoods and the cutting room acoustics were altered. Negotiations were even conduc­ted with Robert Masters with a view to his buying the studio, but in the end he said that the figures weren't right. Brandt's appointed a receiver manager on December 27, 1972.
Old 4th May 2009 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arny View Post
Command RIP Continued
Robert Masters with a view to his buying the studio, but in the end he said that the figures weren't right. Brandt's appointed a receiver manager on December 27, 1972.
Dear Carl,
Here is how I know who bought the gear.

Best Regards,

Tony.

But Vangelis has not been one to get it together in the country: between leaving Greece, done so regretfully but as a reaction to `the musical colonisation by the Italians. or Americans, or whatever', and arrival in London.
His film and television work, however. proved attractive and lasting, and while he has left much behind he hopes to maintain `once I can get this studio finished.' As usual, spare tape machine parts take two days from LA, the chairs six weeks from Ealing.
The main job in hand was the album, start of a new contract with RCA and an optimistic late October issue. During the record­ing, some new ground was broken: the sound of the English Chamber Choir hitting his characteristically barbaric rhythmic arrangements and then all those timps should provide food for a few neighbours' thoughts-the photo shows the equivalent event at a date in the Paris Olympia. It was hoped that a big concert performance would accompany the album issue `with, er, a hundred drums... well, maybe 30'. But at the time of writing, nothing was finalised.
The large control room has four Lockwoods rail-mounted slightly back of centre. They do strain a bit, and the thought `once we get things organised' is to purchase perhaps some more powerful JBLs. Sitting in the corner is a feeling of deja vu hovering around the API console which used to grace Command Studio One-apparently a bit of maintenance and reworking by Roger Paton and everyone was very content, although one channel slider still bears the legend `phucked'. The huge wooden cabi­net containing the three tape machines also has a familiar ring to it, as does engineer Alan Lucas who looks a bit more contented and as casually free with words as any dour Scotsman. Vangelis had been one of the prospective buyers for Com­mand, making qualifiedly enthusi­astic noises about the place, but discussions lapsed when the land­lords said they didn't want the premises to be used for a recording studio any more.


Old 4th May 2009 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arny View Post
Dear Carl,
Here is how I know who bought the gear.

Best Regards,

Tony.

But Vangelis has not been one to get it together in the country: between leaving Greece,

Dear Carl,
Here is where I enter the Story

Best Regards,

Tony.

Many years later when I was looking for a consul to complete an album deal that I had for my own Band with a record company, an API was one of the Desks on my list, the owner of the record company called me as said he had found a second hand API.
He took us to Vangelis’s place which was an amazing place, and what a nice guy, introduced me to his Engineer Keith Spencer Allan, who showed me the desk.
The good news he said is “You can have it cheap” , the bad news is it has been completely butchered, by an engineers serious mistake.

Here is what had happened
The Consul when it was at Command and the same as used by Vangelis, had most of the Rec/Play Electronics were fitted in the API Consul, for the 3 Scully Transports sitting close by, the engineer could then choose a choice of Multitracks, Quad & Stereo machines.
There were 32 Scully electronics in total I am lead to believe, this enabled the engineer as little as 16 tracks on the Main multi giving a choice of Quad and Stereo Mixing.
If there were more electronics, then up to 24 Tracks on the Main multi again giving a choice of Quad and Stereo Mixing, on the remaining two transports, on the remaining two transports.

The engineer responsible for the butcher job, (I’m not sure if he still lives or at least lucky enough to walk still) took a pair of gigantic shears and proceeded to cut through what he thought was the cables going to the Scully’s but NO, they were the main cable looms for the API and the Patchbays.
It would take three months at least to properly separate the consul from the Scully’s and then rewire the whole consul, I only had two months in which to deliver an Album

There was no separate control room it was all in one massive room, which I grant you, could have been a small theatre because all of the Drums and percussion were set up at the far end of the room on a Stage.
I have never seen so many keyboards in my life even when entering a shop.

The API at the time was being replaced with a Quad Eight, while the Multi’s were being replaced by Lyrec machines.
Keith and I became friends after that when he joined “Studio Sound” as the editor and he acted as editor for several articles that I wrote for the Mag.

A very talented Producer/Engineer, a guy called “Lord” (His first name escapes me) from Bristol bought the API and had it completely rebuilt, and ended up working with Peter Gabriel on many projects, great team, but made the mistake of going Total Recall, and vanished from the earth, Peter went on to build “Real World Studios”.





Old 4th May 2009 | Show parent
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WOW!What a disaster for that studio.I'm shocked and amazed and greatfull to receive this much info on a story that... for the most part is very off the radar and very obscure.I'm a huge Vangelis fan as well.So that is double good to know.The" Lord"you speak of...his name is David Lord.Their is much footage (posted on youtube) of him and Peter Gabriel working on the "security" album.So it's scully and a butchered API at Command studios then the API went to Vangelis then to David Lord and then it probably got butchered or tossed out into the trash because the SSL came along.This blows my mind that someone would find my post and have this story to tell.The quad eight console that replaced the re-worked vangelis API didn't sound too shabby either.I'm quite floored Tony.What was your band and did you have a nick name if you don't mind me asking? thank you.
Old 4th May 2009 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carlheinz View Post
WOW!What a disaster for that studio.I'm shocked and amazed and greatfull to receive this much info on a story that... for the most part is very off the radar and very obscure.I'm a huge Vangelis fan as well.So that is double good to know.The" Lord"you speak of...his name is David Lord.Their is much footage (posted on youtube) of him and Peter Gabriel working on the "security" album.So it's scully and a butchered API at Command studios then the API went to Vangelis then to David Lord and then it probably got butchered or tossed out into the trash because the SSL came along.This blows my mind that someone would find my post and have this story to tell.The quad eight console that replaced the re-worked vangelis API didn't sound too shabby either.I'm quite floored Tony.What was your band and did you have a nick name if you don't mind me asking? thank you.
Dear Carl,
Many thanks for your kind words, the truth is that I am at an age where I like to share what knowledge I have of our industry, so part of the pleasure is mine.

I forgot to mention, that years later, I was asked by ampex to go and service a machine in London at Utopia Village, I got the machine (An Ampex MM1100) up and running and went through to where the owner was working and low and behold was an API, and when we got talking it was the Ex-Command Consul he said that he bought it from the guy called Mr Lord, which confirmed it.
It might sound strange but this studio called “Sound Developments” mainly does Video Preparation ? !!

I think he still has it, it does have the original API 550A Mic pre's.
Looked on the web just, now could not find them but I'll speak with friends if you wish to see where they are now

The band was called "The Shack Band" we played a kinda Irish Rock The Singer played a great Fiddle I played Slide.
We never got far, but loved not getting there.
My main carreer has been a Producer/Engineer as well as being a Tech.

Others call me "Arny" there is more information at Home =Arnys Shack


Best Regards,

Tony.
Tony Arnold (Director)
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Old 29th October 2019
  #8
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Dear All, I have just come upon this ten year old blog.

If anyone has any more information they can share about my father I would love to hear it!

Gillian Mosely (daughter of John)
Old 20th November 2019
  #9
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I remember visiting Command when I was in London working as a studio maintenance engineer at Marquee Studios. I had a friend, another Kiwi who was maintenance engineer at Command. The Scully idea was just stupid. They should have had dedicated multis and 2 track/ 4tracks. The whole quad idea was not too bright either. The monitoring and acoustics were bad. The Rock Box was another disaster, it smelt like a horsebox! So I'm afraid it was doomed to failure. Great getting more of the details Tony. I never knew any of the principals being a lowly maintenance engineer.
Old 20th November 2019
  #10
Nod
Gear Head
 

Amazing video here

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5LRj7IjquI

featuring a very young Pete Wingfiled!
Old 20th November 2019
  #11
Here for the gear
 

I too experienced Command Studios, firstly in 1970 when I attempted to have master lacquers cut for Atomic Rooster’s Death Walks Behind You LP which I’d engineered (bar one track). Denis Comper operated the lathe but prior to the cutting session he took me for a tour of the studios which were already dismal and out of date.

The other occasion was in 1973 while working at The Robert Stigwood Organisation. Stigwood asked me to evaluate Command with a view to RSO buying it. The place was even worse three years later and a non-starter as a business purchase.

I’ve talked about my engineering experiences and the Command cutting debacle in Part 1 of my recollections:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUiXUoqnNIY

Last edited by SussFour; 25th November 2019 at 01:18 PM.. Reason: Punctuation corrections.
Old 15th July 2020
  #12
Here for the gear
 

I was at Sound Developments when the API arrived.
It was considerably modded by a talented engineer, Robert Haggas, who went on to work for Air and Mark Knoppfler's studios, British Grove Studios.
The other API went to Manfred Mann's Workhouse Studios.
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