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How to consolidate regions and export audio from the following DAWs? DAW Software
Old 8th November 2008
  #1
How to consolidate regions and export audio from the following DAWs?

Hi, folks. I'm trying to put together a worksheet and need a hand from some of you non-Pro Tools users.

I'm wondering how folks approach consolidating regions and exporting the files for use in any DAW (in other words, files with a common starting point, with no processing from the DAW of origin). I'm familiar with doing it in Pro Tools and Logic, but was hoping to get some info on how y'all do it in the following DAWs:

- Nuendo
- Sonar
- Cubase
- Reason
- Digital Performer
- Reaper

Or any other DAWs you might use.

I'd really appreciate anyone who can take a minute to share their knowledge; I don't have access to all these platforms to figure it out myself and Google searches are revealing a lotta conflicting and confusing info, so I'm coming to you guys for help.

Thanks in advance.
Old 8th November 2008
  #2
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FeatheredSerpent's Avatar
 

Erm, I'm not too au fait with protools speak, but do you mean how do we bounce tracks down internally?

In cubase, all you need to do is set the start and end locate points on the timeline to encompass the passage of audio you want to bounce (select tracks, hit P), make sure the tracks you want bounced are soloed, then choose
File>Export>Audio Mixdown.

You get a dialogue box where you can set loads of stuff:

Bit depth and sample rate if it's to be different to your project settings.
Which output buss the signal is to be taken from.
Whether it is to be a mono/stereo intrlvd/split stereo file
Filename
Format (.wav/broadcast wave/.mp3 etc
Destination (and whether or not you want the resulting file to be automatically inserted back into the project on a new audio track)

That's it.

If you're just rendering single tracks then you can just hit the freeze button for VSIs, in fact I think in Cubase 4 you can freeze audio tracks now too, I don't have it but maybe someone can confirm.
Old 8th November 2008
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeatheredSerpent View Post
Erm, I'm not too au fait with protools speak, but do you mean how do we bounce tracks down internally?

In cubase, all you need to do is set the start and end locate points on the timeline to encompass the passage of audio you want to bounce (select tracks, hit P), make sure the tracks you want bounced are soloed, then choose
File>Export>Audio Mixdown.

You get a dialogue box where you can set loads of stuff:

Bit depth and sample rate if it's to be different to your project settings.
Which output buss the signal is to be taken from.
Whether it is to be a mono/stereo intrlvd/split stereo file
Filename
Format (.wav/broadcast wave/.mp3 etc
Destination (and whether or not you want the resulting file to be automatically inserted back into the project on a new audio track)

That's it.

If you're just rendering single tracks then you can just hit the freeze button for VSIs, in fact I think in Cubase 4 you can freeze audio tracks now too, I don't have it but maybe someone can confirm.
Well, I don't want to bounce the whole program. I want to export the individual tracks from a common start time so that they can be loaded up and mixed in any DAW. The problem with the freeze function is that it renders the processing to the audio file, which sorta defeats the purpose of mixing in another DAW.

Thanks, though!

Do you know how to export the individual tracks WITHOUT freezing them?
Old 8th November 2008
  #4
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BradM's Avatar
There are some potential points of confusion so I'll try to clear this up. There's conflicting terminology in Nuendo/Cubase and ProTools. In ProTools, you guys "consolidate" tracks. In Nuendo/Cubase that same process is called "bounce". In ProTools, "bounce" means to export a mix. In Nuendo/Cubase this would be called "Export Audio Mixdown".

To do what you are asking in Nuendo/Cubase, it's a little different than what Feathered Serpent is describing although you can get there by following his instructions for each track individually.

Tool - Range Tool
Highlight all tracks starting at t=0 and dragging out to end of song
Audio - Bounce (replace events)

Then you can Save to Project to New Folder and it will only copy all your bounced files into the new folder.

Brad
Old 8th November 2008
  #5
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Mo Facta's Avatar
I'm really surprised no one has mentioned OMF. Open Media Framework interchange is the best way to export and import entire projects across platforms. In Cubase/Nuendo no soloing is required and no left and right locators are required.

All you need to do is: File>Export>OMF and presto, the entire project is exported with every track and audio event at it's sample position with no processing. Most, if not all, DAWs accept OMF files so for me, it's the one-stop solution.

Cheers.
Old 8th November 2008
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mo Facta View Post
I'm really surprised no one has mentioned OMF. Open Media Framework interchange is the best way to export and import entire projects across platforms. In Cubase/Nuendo no soloing is required and no left and right locators are required.

All you need to do is: File>Export>OMF and presto, the entire project is exported with every track and audio event at it's sample position with no processing. Most, if not all, DAWs accept OMF files so for me, it's the one-stop solution.

Cheers.
The problems with OMF is that for PTools you have to pay for it. Also I noticed going from OMF files in Logic 8.0 to PTools sometimes the data doesn't line up right.

The reason no one is responding to the question above is not many programs if any alone let you consolidate tracks at all. They almost all do off line bouncing though.
Old 8th November 2008
  #7
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FeatheredSerpent's Avatar
 

I forgot the 'common starting point part'!

Good thing there's a translator :0)

I didn't pick up on the fact that you wanted to export every track in the project, I assumed that you would be extracting selected tracks, don't know why!

I just looked at some protools lingo - If I'm getting this right, you have say 30 audio tracks/channels, with audio regions on each that start in different places, and you want to export each of those tracks individually, without effects, and with a common start time so you can slot them into any other daw and have them align perfectly, right?

So I would instead pull the beginning of just the first occurring region on each track all the way back to 0.0.0.00, the region ends can stay where they are.
Then each and every consolidated track starts at 0, which is what you want.
For a 'multi-track bounce' Brad's bounce command method is far more elegant ie quicker, but I would do it a bit differently.
Make sure the first region on each track starts at 0 as I mentioned, Ctrl+A to select everything, then Audio>Bounce>Replace events.

This command will consolidate all regions on each track, for all tracks.
Then as Brad says, File>Save Project to new Folder and you're done.

As for effects, you just disable/mute the effects on the channels, there are switches for disabling all inserts at once, all sends at once, eq etc.
Fades are always included though.

As an aside, freeze works the same way, so you can freeze without effects no problem, just disable whatever it is on the vsi output track you don't want.
If you have un-rendered vsi tracks, you will have to render them first, pull the beginning of the rendered file to the beginning etc OR write a midi note in at the beggining of bar 1 before the render which will create the freeze from that point, then you don't have to resize afterwards.
Old 8th November 2008
  #8
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FeatheredSerpent's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor View Post
The reason no one is responding to the question above is not many programs if any alone let you consolidate tracks at all. They almost all do off line bouncing though.
Are you sure? I'm not familiar with any of them other than 'the 'base', but I thought all sequencers 'consolidated', you just render the track, it's the same thing. Hmm, right?

Btw, it's taken 8 posts just to cover Cubendo, this might be a long thread lol!
Old 8th November 2008
  #9
Gear Addict
 

In Logic, regions are consolidated via highlighting them and using the glue tool (esc 6). As you would expect, the regions are replaced with a contiguous file in your arrange window. This works in the domain of raw audio; no inserts or fader information is applied to the bounce.

To export a track from 0 with inserts, bus sends, levels, pans, and automation, use the export track function. This function entirely bypasses any processing and level settings on the master fader.

I know you didn't ask for Logic specifically, but I hope this helps.
Old 8th November 2008
  #10
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Mo Facta's Avatar
Oh yeah, by the way, the method described above is only for Cubase/Nuendo.

Currently, the following platforms support OMF:

Avid
SONAR
Cubase
Final Cut Pro
Logic Pro
Nuendo
Pro Tools
Digital Performer
SADiE
Automatic Duck

Also, there are two versions of OMF - 1.0 and 2.0 - and they offer different features, with 2.0 assumingly being the most up to date and versatile. One drawback is, as of now, OMF only supports up to a 2 gig export size. This is ok for small/med songs but if you're doing larger projects, you might have to resort to exporting each track seperately from a common starting point, or seeking out an alternative interchange format.

Another option is AAF or Advance Authoring Format. For more information on this go to:

Advanced Authoring Format - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Another interchange format is EDL (Edit Decision List). For more info on this, click here:

Guide to EDL Management

Hope that helps.

Cheers.
Old 8th November 2008
  #11
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FeatheredSerpent's Avatar
 

Oh, that reminds me, when you save the project to a new folder, make sure you check the box labeled 'Remove unused media', otherwise the new folder will still be bulging with edits and god knows how many clips of audio that didn't make the final cut and will take ages to transfer.
Old 8th November 2008
  #12
OMF - too many headaches and potential for f-ups.

same thing with having to remember to clear/bypass plugins.

Bgrotto is trying to put together a fool-proof advice tip for clients so that it's easy to give advice for clients to prepare potential sessions.

Like:
Logic - mute any unused tracks, select whole song on song locate bar thing, choose "export all tracks"

PT we all know....consolidate from the same point (****/alt/3) and export (shift/apple/j).

The whole freeze/mixdown thing isn't really what's required - in most situations, we want the unprocessed files, ignoring the monitor levels and FX.

The number of ways people are able to screw the export function up is unreal, as I'm sure bgrotto and everyone else mixing for a living can tell you.

My favourite one so far was a mix of a demo done in garage band...somehow the self-recording artist had managed to export and reimport the tracks each overdub into a new session, but was importing the tracks as MP3s each time...the 4th generation wasn't pretty listening. Fortunately he'd included all the previous garageband files, so once we worked out what had happened, it was easy enough to start from the first session and export just the new unprocessed files from each new session.
Old 8th November 2008
  #13
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ssaudio's Avatar
 

In Sonar:
Bounce all 'clips' in each track - this will give you a single file per track (select all the clips, right click, 'Bounce to Clip(s)'
Set for 'Save all Tracks as Broadcast Wav' in Global Options
Export Raw Tracks
Old 8th November 2008
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bgrotto View Post
Hi, folks. I'm trying to put together a worksheet and need a hand from some of you non-Pro Tools users.
THis would be a wonderful resource. When you finish your worksheet it would be great to post it as a new thread and make it a sticky!! I run into this problem all the time with clients hiring me to mix.

What Brad said for Cubase is the way to do it. I will try and sit down and write up an idiot-proof step-by-step that a circus monkey could follow... but it will have to wait until Tuesday before I can do it.
Old 8th November 2008
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris carter View Post
THis would be a wonderful resource. When you finish your worksheet it would be great to post it as a new thread and make it a sticky!! I run into this problem all the time with clients hiring me to mix.
I'm making it for my own website for exactly those reasons. The remote mixing gig is tricky that way, y'know?

Anyway, once it's all done, I'll first re-post it here for everyone to proof read (just to make sure it's accurate), then I'll email it to a moderator.

I'm actually creating an entire checklist of things to do before sending files for mixing; I can post those too if anyone's interested.
Old 8th November 2008
  #16
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Quote:
In Sonar:
Bounce all 'clips' in each track - this will give you a single file per track (select all the clips, right click, 'Bounce to Clip(s)'
Set for 'Save all Tracks as Broadcast Wav' in Global Options
Export Raw Tracks
I just did this because I'd never really thought of it before. The method above gets it done, but I think it's faster this way because you can skip going through the tracks & bouncing the clips together 1 track at a time.

-Edit>Select All
-(If not done already, select View>Toolbars>Select)
-Pick start & end points with the Select Toolbar & the Timeline (clicking in the track window will disable the select all)
-File>Export>Audio
-In the dialog box that appears: Source-Tracks...then pick the rest of the options you want...ie:TrackFX on or off,Track Automation, Mute,Solo, pick the folder to put them in...etc etc..
-Click Export

Todd
Old 8th November 2008
  #17
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FeatheredSerpent's Avatar
 

Jesus, I really shouldn't post when I've been up all night tutt

Brad's method is the one you want for cubase, yes.
If it's an idiot proof guide, then it's worth taking into account that people's working mixes are going to include group routings, fader levels that are not optimal for export etc, so you're going to have to include steps for that too.

Suggested checklist for cubase is:

1. Save project under a new name ie ProjectXforExport.cpr
2. Close original project.
3. Reset all faders to unity.
4. Re-route all tracks to master stereo buss.
5. Disable all insert effects, eq and sends on all channels.
6. Render any VSTi tracks if not done all ready.
7. Delete all unused tracks
8. Hit Ctrl+A to select all events on all remaining tracks
9. Select the 'Range' tool
10. Define range as being from t=0 to end of song
11. Drop down menu - Audio>Bounce
12. Choose 'replace events' in the dialogue box
13. When bounce is complete - File>Save project to new folder
14. In the dialogue box, make sure 'Minimise audio files' is checked
15. The resulting folder is your session file to take to the studio.
Old 8th November 2008
  #18
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeatheredSerpent View Post
If it's an idiot proof guide
yes...yes please.
Old 8th November 2008
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeatheredSerpent View Post
Jesus, I really shouldn't post when I've been up all night tutt

Brad's method is the one you want for cubase, yes.
If it's an idiot proof guide, then it's worth taking into account that people's working mixes are going to include group routings, fader levels that are not optimal for export etc, so you're going to have to include steps for that too.

Suggested checklist for cubase is:

1. Save project under a new name ie ProjectXforExport.cpr
2. Close original project.
3. Reset all faders to unity.
4. Re-route all tracks to master stereo buss.
5. Disable all insert effects, eq and sends on all channels.
6. Render any VSTi tracks if not done all ready.
7. Delete all unused tracks
8. Hit Ctrl+A to select all events on all remaining tracks
9. Select the 'Range' tool
10. Define range as being from t=0 to end of song
11. Drop down menu - Audio>Bounce
12. Choose 'replace events' in the dialogue box
13. When bounce is complete - File>Save project to new folder
14. In the dialogue box, make sure 'Minimise audio files' is checked
15. The resulting folder is your session file to take to the studio.
The checklist is for guaranteeing compatibility with my HD rig, and also to save me doing annoying extra work.

I'm not concerned with preserving others' mix routing, effects, etc. To give you an idea of what I meant, here's my checklist:

Quote:
Clients sending digital files for mixing can ensure the best possible results by following these simple guidelines (a tape-based mix check list is located at the bottom of this page):

1. It's essential, regardless of the DAW you use, to consolidate all the audio files within a session to a common starting point. This ensures that I can open up your song without timing errors on my Pro Tools HD rig. Unless, of course, you're into the modern random composition thing.

Consolidating multiple audio regions on a track into a single file is NOT the same thing as what many DAWs refer to as the "Freeze" function. "Freezing" tracks creates temporary files with all processing, automation, and levels rendered to the file itself. In other words, if you've added EQ or other processing to a track, that processing will be apparent on the "frozen" file. You can think of it as bouncing each track individually.

Consolidating, on the other hand, simply creates a single new, unprocessed file from all regions on a given track. If you're unsure of how to consolidate audio files in your DAW, select your DAW from the list below for instructions:

- Pro Tools (HD, LE, or M-Powered)
- Nuendo
- Digital Performer
- Sonar
- Cubase
- Logic
- Reason

2. Before consolidating your files, make sure you've done all the necessary edits, and DON'T FORGET TO ADD YOUR CROSSFADES. Forgetting those crossfades can cause all sorts of nasty clicks and pops which are impossible to remove once the audio has been consolidated.

Also be sure to "Strip Silence", where necessary. "Strip Silence" means cutting out the audio where there is no usable sound. For example, silencing the spaces between vocal lines where the only thing you can hear is the bleed from the headphones. Stripping Silence in this way will create a much clearer, less cluttered mix, and can improve the final sound quality considerably.

If you prefer, I can do the necessary editing for you for an additional $50/hr, with a one hour minimum.

3. Do your own "clean" vocal versions. Whether this means punching in over cuss words, or manually silencing, reversing, or otherwise tidying things that might offend your grandparents is up to you. Songs that are sent for mixing without an alternate clean version will be mixed as-is, meaning you won't have a radio (and grandma)-friendly mix. If you decide you want a radio mix, I can do the editing myself, but it'll run you $50/hr with a one hour minimum.

CLIENTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CONTENT OF THEIR CLEAN MIXES!! If you choose to leave a questionable word in, or if you miss a cuss when you're editing, I will mix the song as-is under the assumption that the word in question was left in there intentionally. Again, if I find myself editing out a great deal of radio-unfriendly language for your clean version, I'll have to charge the $50/hr with a one hour minimum fee.

One last thing - I am not an expert on what the FCC considers "radio-friendly" language. If I'm asked to create a clean vocal track, I will - unless otherwise instructed! - edit out EVERY swear (that includes words like "damn", "bitch", "ass"), EVERY gun and drug reference, and any other thing that the powers-that-be might worry could corrupt our youth. So if you need me to do a clean version, be sure to get specific with regards to what language you want me to save our children from.

4. If you've created any special effects, volume rides, or other processing that you feel is necessary to the production, please include that processing as one file, as well as the "dry" (unprocessed) audio as another file.

For example. let's say you have found a way to somehow tastefully use the T-Pain-style AutoTune effect on the lead vocal, and you feel it's an essential part of the production, and you're concerned I may have trouble recreating its delicate subtlety. Go ahead and print the vocal with the T-Pain effect, and also print an alternate version of that same vocal without the T-Pain effect. Just be sure to notify me of the alternate audio file. This gives me maximum flexibility at mix time. Not to mention a means to talk you out of dating your music, so that we can all enjoy it in ten years without blushing.

If you're pretty slick with your program of choice, you could send me a 100% dry track, and a 100% wet, effects-only track (this is very useful for ambient effect such as reverb or delay).

5. If you're working in a workstation-style program such as Reason, be sure to mute all effects, bypass all EQs and compressors, and turn off all volume and panning automation (unless you feel it's essential to the production, in which case, see number 4 above).

6. Please, please, please (with a cherry on top!) provide me with a rough (or smooth!) reference mix of some kind. Without one, I'm just gonna go crazy on the track, unleashing my wildest whims, and we could potentially waste a lot of time with volume balance issues if I don't have a clear reference of what you as the producer envisioned as the final balance.

7. If possible, all the tracks you submit should peak around -6dBfs or so; please don't send overloaded, clipped, or digital-full-scale audio. It will put a serious cap on the possible sound quality, and it will make me sad.

Also, if possible, try to submit the audio as uncompressed (meaning, aif or wav files, NOT mp3s!!), 24-bit audio. I don't care what sample rate you send, but prefer 44.1 or 88.2 where possible. If the sessions are fairly large, and you plan on getting me the files via my ftp server, 44.1 sample rate files will transfer more quickly, so that'd probably be the best bet.

8. If you plan on mailing me the files via UPS, FedEx, or some other snail-mail style package delivery service, make sure you have a tracking number and/or delivery confirmation. Also, if possible, send the files on a hard drive; they tend to be more reliable than DVDs. I personally like using drives small enough to throw into a padded envelope; they mail very well and seem more impervious to damage during shipping. If you must send the files on DVD, be sure to include at least one (but preferably two or even three) redundant backups in case there are any issues pulling the data off the first DVD.

9. The last order of business is just the miscellaneous info I'd like you to send me along with the files. This includes:
- the final name of the song as you'd like it to appear, with the correct spelling and punctuation
- the name of the artist, with the correct spelling and punctuation
- the name of the album or mixtape (if there is one) that the song will be appearing on, with the correct spelling and punctuation
- the tempo of the song
- the key of the song (if you know it)
- lyrics sheets are handy, but not necessary


FOR THOSE CLIENTS SENDING SONGS TO BE MIXED FROM TAPE:

1. First off, thank you! Tape is fun.

2. Please include a detailed track sheet, make sure you've included calibration tones on the tape, and please note tape speed, EQ curve, and all of that other good stuff.

3. Thanks again, you rule!
Ya dig?
Old 8th November 2008
  #20
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FeatheredSerpent's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bgrotto View Post
The checklist is for guaranteeing compatibility with my HD rig, and also to save me doing annoying extra work.

I'm not concerned with preserving others' mix routing, effects, etc. To give you an idea of what I meant, here's my checklist:



Ya dig?
I do now
I'm just being a ******! I keep confusing a bounce with an export in all kinds of strange ways. Now I appreciate how simple it is.

I think you should include a reference to VST instruments in the freeze section though, a lot of people still associate freeze with a VSTi, as freezing of audio tracks is relatively recent. If they don't double check all the files they might not realise that their VSTi tracks didn't automatically render.
Sounds obvious but if you want it to be idiot proof.. (coming from someone that only just got the original premise ha ha!)
Also the section you have already written about recorded track levels, trimming the regions, making sure the fades are right etc, that should be included as standard in the individual sequencer check list as well, otherwise you're splitting a 'lot' of information across two sources, best to keep the main text as concise as possible and put all the detail in the sequencer pages, keep the procedure in one contiguous set of instructions - it's worth drumming in.

The checkbox info is important too as there will still be all the original audio files in the bounced project folder, need to get rid of these.

Ok, third time lucky..

1. Save project under a new name ie ProjectXforExport.cpr
2. Render any VSTi tracks if not done all ready.
3. Delete all unused tracks
4. Select the 'Range' tool
5. Define range as being from t=0 to end of song
6. Drop down menu - Audio>Bounce Selection
7. Choose 'Replace Events' in the dialogue box
8. When bounce is complete - File>Save project to new folder
9. In the dialogue box, make sure 'Minimise Audio Files' is checked
10. The resulting folder is your session file to take to the studio.


*crosses fingers* heh
Old 9th November 2008
  #21
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ssaudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by shaddai View Post
I just did this because I'd never really thought of it before. The method above gets it done, but I think it's faster this way because you can skip going through the tracks & bouncing the clips together 1 track at a time.

-Edit>Select All
-(If not done already, select View>Toolbars>Select)
-Pick start & end points with the Select Toolbar & the Timeline (clicking in the track window will disable the select all)
-File>Export>Audio
-In the dialog box that appears: Source-Tracks...then pick the rest of the options you want...ie:TrackFX on or off,Track Automation, Mute,Solo, pick the folder to put them in...etc etc..
-Click Export
Yes, but they won't necessarily import into another DAW correctly that way - exporting one file per track as a Broadcast Wave file ensures compatibility with every DAW I've ever used
Old 9th November 2008
  #22
Quote:
Originally Posted by shaddai View Post
I just did this because I'd never really thought of it before. The method above gets it done, but I think it's faster this way because you can skip going through the tracks & bouncing the clips together 1 track at a time.

-Edit>Select All
-(If not done already, select View>Toolbars>Select)
-Pick start & end points with the Select Toolbar & the Timeline (clicking in the track window will disable the select all)
-File>Export>Audio
-In the dialog box that appears: Source-Tracks...then pick the rest of the options you want...ie:TrackFX on or off,Track Automation, Mute,Solo, pick the folder to put them in...etc etc..
-Click Export

Todd
Actually, in Sonar (6, at any rate) if nothing is selected when you do your export, it's the same as though everything was selected (from the beginning) -- so, as long as you want to export everything from start to end of clips, you can save even more steps. (Of course you still want to select "tracks" in the source pulldown in the export dialog, as well as the other options.

(If you have any soft synths or tricky plugs, I would also strongly recommend against using the Fast Bounce option [at least as of version 6], as it can cause degradation in the bounce. And, there's no reason I can think of not to use the 64 bit render option in export, even if you normally have the engine set to 32 bit operation. Assuming you haven't done any destructive edits, you get the full benefit of 64 bit rendering (whatever one perceives that to be) with only a little extra rendering time. It's pretty close to win-win.)
Old 9th November 2008
  #23
OK, folks, thanks for all the contributions so far. Here's what I got (please let me know of any errors/corrections/etc):

Quote:
Consolidating regions in Sonar:

1. From the Edit menu, select "Select All".

2. Pick the start and end points with the Select Toolbar and the Timeline (clicking in the track window will disable the Select All).

3. From the File menu, select Export > Audio

4. In the dialog box that appears, select "Tracks" as the source, and be sure to disable Track Effects, Automation, Mute, Solo, etc, and choose a new folder to put the consolidating audio files into.
Quote:
Consolidating regions in Pro Tools HD, LE, and M-Powered:

On the Mac -

1. Ensure that the audio tracks are all clearly named.

2. Highlight all the audio in the Edit Window, making sure you've successfully selected before the beginning of the early-most region and after the end of the last-most region.

3. Press and hold Option and Shift, and while pressing them, press "3" (the one above the QWERTY keyboard, not the numeric keypad).

Alternatively, you could select "Consolidate Selection" from the Edit pull-down menu.

4. To export these new files, highlight them all to select them, and press Command + Shift + "K".

Alternatively, you could select "Export Selected as Files" from the Audio Regions List pull-down menu.

Remember to export them as 24-bit wav or aif files, using the "(Multiple) Mono" format.

On the PC -

1. Ensure that the audio tracks are all clearly named.

2. Highlight all the audio in the Edit Window, making sure you've successfully selected before the beginning of the early-most region and after the end of the last-most region.

3. Press and hold Alt and Shift, and while pressing them, press "3" (the one above the QWERTY keyboard, not the numeric keypad).

Alternatively, you could select "Consolidate Selection" from the Edit pull-down menu.

4. To export these new files, highlight them all to select them, and press CNTRL + Shift + "K".

Alternatively, you could select "Export Selected as Files" from the Audio Regions List pull-down menu.

Remember to export them as 24-bit wav or aif files, using the "(Multiple) Mono" format.
Quote:
Consolidating regions in Logic:

From the Arrange page choose File > Export > All Tracks As Audio Files

Remember to export them as 24-bit wav or aif files, or, if you must, SD II files (just remember SD II only supports sample rates up to 48kHz).
Quote:
Consolidating regions in Digital Performer:

1. Put a piece of audio at 0:00:00.000 on every track.

2. Select all the audio in all the tracks, and be sure

3. Select Merge Soundbites from the Audio pull-down menu.

Note that this will create new files, which can be retrieved from the Audio Files folder. Just sort the files by Date Created so that they are grouped together.
Quote:
Consolidating regions in Cubase/Nuendo:

1. Select the Range Tool, and highlight all tracks from 0:00:00.000 through to the very end of the very last region.

2. From the Audio menu, select Bounce and Replace Events.

3. From the File menu, select Save Project to New Folder, and all the new consolidated files will be available in that new project's Audio Files folder. Just be sure to check the box labelled "Remove Unused Media" to ensure only the consolidated files appear in the Audio Files folder.
Old 9th November 2008
  #24
Lives for gear
 
ssaudio's Avatar
 

Nope, your Sonar advice won't work, sorry.
Old 9th November 2008
  #25
Lives for gear
 

bgrotto
re reaper.
lets say i want to export to one file a trak with lotsa clips in/edits etc.
i hilte from zero to end.
then solo trak.
then FILE>>RENDER.

also do you undrstand how glue works in reaper ?
lets say i have a trak with 20 different clips in.
hold down right mouse button and lassoo ,
then right cliik and glue all together.

do you have the reaper manual ?
its at the reaper site.

there are also lotsa other triks.
the reaper forum is at reaper.fm.
you might also ask there cos many folks have macros /extensions.
Old 9th November 2008
  #26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssaudio View Post
Nope, your Sonar advice won't work, sorry.
Thanks. Care to elaborate?
Old 9th November 2008
  #27
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Tom H's Avatar
 

Logic:





Old 9th November 2008
  #28
Lives for gear
 
ssaudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bgrotto View Post
Thanks. Care to elaborate?
I already have:

Global Options/Save as Broadcast Wav
Ensure all track clips are 'Bounced to Clip' - It depends on what version of Sonar you have as the best way to do that, but this will ensure that all tracks contain one file
Export Raw Tracks to a folder of your choice

As theblue1 mentioned, don't use fast bounce and use 64bit when rendering or exporting.

To my mind Broadcast Wav is the best method because all DAWs recognise them and will happily place them at the correct timestamp on import (if told to do so).
Old 10th November 2008
  #29
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bgrotto View Post
OK, folks, thanks for all the contributions so far. Here's what I got (please let me know of any errors/corrections/etc):

Consolidating regions in Digital Performer:
1. Put a piece of audio at 0:00:00.000 on every track.
2. Select all the audio in all the tracks, and be sure
3. Select Merge Soundbites from the Audio pull-down menu.
Note that this will create new files, which can be retrieved from the Audio Files folder. Just sort the files by Date Created so that they are grouped together.
Another thought:
Also, after merging soundbites, you can, with your project still open, go into the Soundbites palette and select the merged tracks you want, and then choose "Export Soundbites" (from the palette's mini-menu), which will give you a dialog where you can select the format, resolution and destination. This has come in handy for me in the past when working with Sonar users - since DP5 and earlier used SDII as the native file format (no-go for PC). DP6 can use WAVE as a native format by setting it in the preferences.

Thanks for doing this! Very good idea, and will make a lot of people's lives easier.
Old 10th November 2008
  #30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssaudio View Post
I already have:

Global Options/Save as Broadcast Wav
Ensure all track clips are 'Bounced to Clip' - It depends on what version of Sonar you have as the best way to do that, but this will ensure that all tracks contain one file
Export Raw Tracks to a folder of your choice

As theblue1 mentioned, don't use fast bounce and use 64bit when rendering or exporting.

To my mind Broadcast Wav is the best method because all DAWs recognise them and will happily place them at the correct timestamp on import (if told to do so).
I think I see what you mean in a general sense, but since I've never used Sonar, your directions are a bit unclear to me. Could you over-simplify it, step-by-step, and make it stupid simple (like me)? Remember, the object is to have it make sense to the most lay-men of users.
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