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Drummer talkback mic
Old 7th September 2004
  #1
Lives for gear
Drummer talkback mic

Hi folks,
I'm looking for a mic so we can hear the drummer when he's trying to tell us something but I'd like him to be able to switch it off when he's finished! Can someone recommend a mic that could also possibly be used in other applications ie. hand held vocal etc.

Many thanks
Old 7th September 2004
  #2
Can I just point out that while you wish it to be diabled during takes - you KNOW it will be an amazing ambient signal don't you?

It always works out like that IMHO any accidentaly placed mic's usually end up being the BEST drum mic's!

Good luck in your search but I predict you aint NEVER gonna switch that off!



HEY - I HAVE A BRILLIANT IDEA!

Use a SHURE pad cylinder - have the drummer click it over to - 10 db when talking but slide it back to -25 db when doing drum takes! If you set the sound to be RECORDED to a spare track at -25 db you should be able to hear him fine when he clicks it over to the the lowest 'talk back' pad setting!

Damn I'm good!

Old 7th September 2004
  #3
errrmmmm....... correct me if i appear to be very rude or stupid here..... but if you're recording drums.... won't you have a few mics open in the room already? (or is that a trick question...??) lol
Old 7th September 2004
  #4
member no 666
 
Fletcher's Avatar
I dunno Jules... that's usually the "talk back" mic for one of the other musicians or the ref vox mix that always seems to be the best room mic of the bunch... with drums, I've found that if you just solo the overhead(s) you have a perfect communications setup with the drummer... but that could just be me... best part is that you don't have to remember to switch it off when you're done talking to him.

Beech-- if you do set up an additional mic and want it turned off as soon as you start rolling... take the SMPTE output from whatever you're using and use it to key a ducker across the output of the talk back mic... that way when ever you start to roll the time code will tell the ducker to shut down the channel and you don't have to remember.
Old 7th September 2004
  #5
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally posted by muziqfreek
errrmmmm....... correct me if i appear to be very rude or stupid here..... but if you're recording drums.... won't you have a few mics open in the room already? (or is that a trick question...??) lol
Yeah, I must not understand the question either.
My overheads are my talkback mics.

Another option is to buy a cheap dynamic mic that has an on/off toggle switch. I'm sure Radio Shack or similar places sell them.
Old 7th September 2004
  #6
Lives for gear
"Yeah, I must not understand the question either.
My overheads are my talkback mics."

I often find that the kit can be so loud that the overheads will simply not be turned up enough to hear what he's saying. It's not just the engineer who needs to hear, but also the rest of the band, who could be in various rooms.

Thanks for the "ducker" suggestions and to Jules for the SHURE pad cylinder idea. That's cool and I've got to get four of those anyway for my 3124!

Old 7th September 2004
  #7
Deleted User
Guest
In a session I did last week until I set up another mic in the room the drummer and I had an elaborate code of one snare hit for yes, two for no. Perhaps we could have taken it as far as full morse code!!

Overheads usually do it for me but there are sometimes when it requies another mic.

Si
Old 7th September 2004
  #8
Lives for gear
 
meteor's Avatar
 

any old CB type or push-button table top mic is great since the switches are momentary. that way the drummer has to press them to talk and, since drummers aren't always rocket scienteists, the mic will effortlessly turn off as soon as he/she let's the button go. of course, i guess some skin-beater theoretically might attempt to rig some way to keep the button continuously pressed, but that's why you keep a louiseville slugger in the back corner of your mic cabinet.

cheers,
Old 7th September 2004
  #9
Harmon Kneenot
Guest
pzm's work good
Old 8th September 2004
  #10
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally posted by Beech
I often find that the kit can be so loud that the overheads will simply not be turned up enough to hear what he's saying. It's not just the engineer who needs to hear, but also the rest of the band, who could be in various rooms.
Try to monitor the sound of the kit from the overheads and supplement it with close mics (at least while tracking). This way your overheads will easily pick-up the drummer talking and anyone who is any room will hear him talk. The volume of the kit should have little bearing on this scenario.

If your overhead faders are lower than your close mic faders while monitoring, then you may experience the problem you are getting.
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