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Advice for drum mix Dynamic Microphones
Old 22nd March 2008
  #1
Gear Head
 
noonansky's Avatar
 

Advice for drum mix

Recently I recorded a band and it was my first real experience mixing and editing drums.
It was run through a presonus fp10 into cubase sx3 the mics were as follows:
kick: akg d112
snare: shure pg56
rack tom: shure pg56
floor tom: shure pg52
Overheads: shure pg81(2)
the drums were compressed, eqed, and other various plugins like reverb were used, but other than the obvious clipping, it sounds like there could be other things that could be fixed.
any and all suggestions are much obliged!
the track is only drums and 2 guitars, which were run through a line6 toneport ux2 (yes, i know haha) but i really would just like some pointers on the drum mix.
Attached Files

T4FINAL.mp3 (2.71 MB, 3970 views)

Old 22nd March 2008
  #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noonansky View Post
Recently I recorded a band and it was my first real experience mixing and editing drums.
It was run through a presonus fp10 into cubase sx3 the mics were as follows:
kick: akg d112
snare: shure pg56
rack tom: shure pg56
floor tom: shure pg52
Overheads: shure pg81(2)
the drums were compressed, eqed, and other various plugins like reverb were used, but other than the obvious clipping, it sounds like there could be other things that could be fixed.
any and all suggestions are much obliged!
the track is only drums and 2 guitars, which were run through a line6 toneport ux2 (yes, i know haha) but i really would just like some pointers on the drum mix.
Hey man...just checked it out...sounds like you captured the spirit of the tune well...one thing of note.

The presence of the drums seems to be lacking a little ...not quite yet but when you add bass I think you're going to lose the drum excitement...there's a couple of things you could try...first lose the reverb completely to start...now Listen to just the tom tracks in stereo and then just the overheads in stereo...where does the drumkit sound better...if it's the Tom tracks you chose then compress these two tracks aggressively...here you are trying to get the toms and cymbal/snare bleed to sound good together...now try blending close kik (which I think needs more 2.5k as opposed to 8k and less 250hz, 130Hz) and the close snare into the mix to where they punch through...if you picked the overheads then compress them to taste and mix the close mics into those tracks...in order to get the toms up here you will have to manually cut around the tomfills so there is no cymbal bleed...also in both scenarios, I would gate the kik and snare tracks so there is no bleed (this can be really fairly tight)....I would start with that only to try and get more percieved "punch" and a little less cymbal...personally I always find that I'm using the tom tracks in stereo (fairly squashed) and not using the overheads at all...also be careful with the reverb... bring it in to enhance (not create) the sound in this type of music...keep in mind this doesn't take into account phase problems (if there is any) but I would start there and see if that changes anything for you...although I do already like what I hear, I think with the decent drummer that you have, you can probably get a little tougher drum sound....also check out parallel compression here (GS)and try that to once you get close. MTC. Cheers.

Nick
Old 22nd March 2008
  #3
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noonansky's Avatar
 

thanks for the reply nick
theyre going to be rerecording tomorrow and for now itll just be tracking drums. I'll be sure to keep those notes in mind and i will post what i got out of it.
thanks again
Old 22nd March 2008
  #4
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noonansky's Avatar
 

yeah i was a little sloppy with the eqing and didnt cut out enough 250hz and it took up too much headroom
Old 22nd March 2008
  #5
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DontLetMeDrown's Avatar
 

I like it. It should sound killer once you add bass guitar. Nice work!
Old 23rd March 2008
  #6
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Nice take

...I agree with my fellow slut about the kick. I am not hearing a lot of bottom end...I hear a lot of sizzle and an overall brightness that could be "warmed up " a bit. I am sure that the bass will help...but see what you can do about getting a bit more balls out of everything. The snare sounds a bit thin for a metal tune. The toms don't knock me out. The only reason I say this is because it is a hardcore tune...and the drums are getting their butts kicked by the guitars.

Nice track...good overall sound...just needs the THUMP.
Old 23rd March 2008
  #7
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yeah unfortunately when we recorded it was last minute so we werent fortunate enough to get new heads on everything. the toms were occupied by probably year and a half old ec2s by a drummer who beats the living **** out of his drums and i figure this had a huge impact on the sound
He is endorsed by c&c custom drums and he recently received a new set though so next time i bet that will make a world of difference
and the snare like i said was very loud even and it was hard to get a really full sound without overpowering everything else
Old 23rd March 2008
  #8
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You will dial it in

Quote:
Originally Posted by noonansky View Post
yeah unfortunately when we recorded it was last minute so we werent fortunate enough to get new heads on everything. the toms were occupied by probably year and a half old ec2s by a drummer who beats the living **** out of his drums and i figure this had a huge impact on the sound
He is endorsed by c&c custom drums and he recently received a new set though so next time i bet that will make a world of difference
and the snare like i said was very loud even and it was hard to get a really full sound without overpowering everything else
It's a good take...you can dial it in. You nailed it on the heads...man a fresh set of Evans G1s on my kit just makes her purr like a kitten. Don't underestimate mic placement, too...when I hate the sound...I start moving stuff around and "voila"! For instance, I am not a huge fan of a "close mic'd" kit sound. I prefer a bigger, more ambient sound from room mics (think Glyn Johns or Eddie Kramer)...and I couldnt' figure out why my snare sounded so THIN when I first started recording....I wanted a "TOOOONK"...then I took the Audix I5 from the bottom resonant head and pointed it sideways paralell to the batter head (just under the highhat) and BOOM. Magic....

Good luck, Bro...and post your little secrets when you find the holy grail! Peace...
Old 23rd March 2008
  #9
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allencollins's Avatar
 

good song, sounds just like iron maiden or helloween









.
Old 23rd March 2008
  #10
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noonansky's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavyG View Post
Don't underestimate mic placement, too...when I hate the sound...I start moving stuff around and "voila"! For instance, I am not a huge fan of a "close mic'd" kit sound. I prefer a bigger, more ambient sound from room mics (think Glyn Johns or Eddie Kramer)...and I couldnt' figure out why my snare sounded so THIN when I first started recording....I wanted a "TOOOONK"...then I took the Audix I5 from the bottom resonant head and pointed it sideways paralell to the batter head (just under the highhat) and BOOM. Magic....
yeah im not a fan of close micing either. honestly, i think it actually sounds pretty amateur. i keep my mics probably AT LEAST 6 inches away from the drum and i have it facing the center because thats where the attack comes from but i vary this according to style of music obviously, but i will definitely try that snare placement
Old 23rd March 2008
  #11
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Thats what i love about fellow Slutz

Quote:
Originally Posted by noonansky View Post
yeah im not a fan of close micing either. honestly, i think it actually sounds pretty amateur. i keep my mics probably AT LEAST 6 inches away from the drum and i have it facing the center because thats where the attack comes from but i vary this according to style of music obviously, but i will definitely try that snare placement
Noonansky...I don't mean to drop my views on you, bro. These are the type of subjects that I love... Man...there are some really talented cats here and for us to be able to share ideas is just awesome...sure it is fun breaking down the ins and outs of gear...but if you have an issue, chances are one of our savvy slutz's has seen it a million times and knows just the antedote for your pain.

Here is a detailed description of the "Glyn Johns Method" that may offer some new techniques to improve your drum recording chops...

Step 1: Forget everything you think you know about recording
drums.
Step 2: Listen up!

Glyn Johns recorded classic rock albums (Beatles, Stones, Who) using a minimal mic setup. Here's a modified setup that will get you everything you could ever want in a drum sound. You'll be blown away if you follow ALL the directions.

1. New heads are vital. Drum heads are like guitar strings -- they go dead quickly and are a pain in the butt to change. But there's just no other way to get a good sound. It's a fact of life for recording drums.

2. Learn to tune drums. Well-tuned drums can be played wide open (NO muffling). That's true of every drum except the kick in all music but jazz. The kick needs careful muffling, which I'll cover later. In the studio, MINIMAL strategic muffling on the snare and toms may be necessary. But if it's more than a small piece of gaffer's tape, you're going too far.

3. This mic setup REQUIRES a combination of five elements, ALL of which are vital:
a) Good sounding, well-maintained drums.
b) New heads all around, top and bottom, chosen to maximize
the resonance of the drums. Usually that means medium
thickness on top (ex. Remo Ambassador) and either
medium or thin (Ex. Remo Diplomat) on resonant side.
c) An excellent drummer. No mic technique will make a bad
drummer sound good. Cymbal thrashers are bad drummers.
A great drummer plays with balance and dynamics.
d) A good engineer with a good set of ears.
e) The proper mics for the job. The mics can vary in quality
(that is, from excellent to awesome), but cannot vary in
TYPE.

OK, here goes. You need:

3 large-diaphragm condenser mics (Rode NT1A or better). This is the heart and soul of the setup.

1 SM-57 for the snare top.

1 Beyer M88 or equivalent for inside the kick.

Optional: Dynamic spot mics for the toms (I use Sennheiser e-604s clipped right to the rims); small diaphragm condenser for under snare drum (I use a Shure KSM. Note: You may need to invert the phase on the snare bottom mic).

The setup:

Place one large diaphragm condenser two feet above the kit. The diaphragm faces down between the snare and the rack toms. Measure the distance from the center of the snare to the diaphragm and make a note of it (In my case, 38 inches).

Place another large diaphragm condenser the same distance from the center of the snare and six inches above the floor tom. The diaphragm faces the hi hat, across the snare.

Place the third large diaphragm condenser in front of the kit, about three feet away, with the diaphragm facing the kit. You will need to listen to this mic to find the sweet spot for exact placement.

Listen to the three mics. This should sound absolutley killer -- like you can't imagine needing anything else. These three mics will give you 85-95% of your sound.

The mic inside the kick is required and is there to pick up the attack of the beater against the head. If you want to hear kick in your mix, you'll need to have separate control over that. Same with the spot mics for toms. They are optional because the large diaphragm mics are going to give you PLENTY of attack from the toms. The spot mics let you boost the toms slightly if you want to.

The snare mics are there to give you maximum tweek capability during mix. The SM-57 is required, but the underside condenser is optional (some engineers will tell you they hardly ever use the underside mic. I always use it). BUT REMEMBER, the three large diaphragms are the core of your sound. The other mics are there to capture sound you can use to tweek the overall drum sound with, but they should never compete with the three main mics.

Panning:

Pan the first large condenser left (9 o'clock), the second right (3 o'clock), and the third straight up. Pan the kick mic straight up as well. Pan the snare mics either striaght up or SLIGHTLY off-center. Pan the tom mics as they naturally fall in relation to the kit, but do not use extreme panning on the tom mics. Pan everything between 3 and 9 o'clock.

If this setup isn't giving you the best drum sound EVER, then there's something seriously wrong.

EQ:

You should not need to EQ the large diaphram mics at all. You should be able to get everything you need out of your compression settings. EQ the spot mics to enhance, not overtake. Remember that the three large diaphragms are your core sound. They should sound like God right out of the blocks. If they don't, adjust your mic placement and/or drum tuning until they do. You CANNOT "fix-it-in-the-mix" and still have a drum sound that rivals the pros, because the pros always get it perfect during tracking (that's WHY they are pros).



Here is another reference on the subject: http://www.blaxploitation.com/drums/glynJohnsMethod.pdf

Ramble on...
Old 23rd March 2008
  #12
Gear Head
 
noonansky's Avatar
 

thank you for that ive been hearing that a lot lately but it always seemed so unorthodox to me but im definitely going to take all your advice and see what i can get out of it
Old 24th March 2008
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavyG View Post
Noonansky...I don't mean to drop my views on you, bro. These are the type of subjects that I love... Man...there are some really talented cats here and for us to be able to share ideas is just awesome...sure it is fun breaking down the ins and outs of gear...but if you have an issue, chances are one of our savvy slutz's has seen it a million times and knows just the antedote for your pain.

Here is a detailed description of the "Glyn Johns Method" that may offer some new techniques to improve your drum recording chops...

Step 1: Forget everything you think you know about recording
drums.
Step 2: Listen up!

Glyn Johns recorded classic rock albums (Beatles, Stones, Who) using a minimal mic setup. Here's a modified setup that will get you everything you could ever want in a drum sound. You'll be blown away if you follow ALL the directions.

1. New heads are vital. Drum heads are like guitar strings -- they go dead quickly and are a pain in the butt to change. But there's just no other way to get a good sound. It's a fact of life for recording drums.

2. Learn to tune drums. Well-tuned drums can be played wide open (NO muffling). That's true of every drum except the kick in all music but jazz. The kick needs careful muffling, which I'll cover later. In the studio, MINIMAL strategic muffling on the snare and toms may be necessary. But if it's more than a small piece of gaffer's tape, you're going too far.

3. This mic setup REQUIRES a combination of five elements, ALL of which are vital:
a) Good sounding, well-maintained drums.
b) New heads all around, top and bottom, chosen to maximize
the resonance of the drums. Usually that means medium
thickness on top (ex. Remo Ambassador) and either
medium or thin (Ex. Remo Diplomat) on resonant side.
c) An excellent drummer. No mic technique will make a bad
drummer sound good. Cymbal thrashers are bad drummers.
A great drummer plays with balance and dynamics.
d) A good engineer with a good set of ears.
e) The proper mics for the job. The mics can vary in quality
(that is, from excellent to awesome), but cannot vary in
TYPE.

OK, here goes. You need:

3 large-diaphragm condenser mics (Rode NT1A or better). This is the heart and soul of the setup.

1 SM-57 for the snare top.

1 Beyer M88 or equivalent for inside the kick.

Optional: Dynamic spot mics for the toms (I use Sennheiser e-604s clipped right to the rims); small diaphragm condenser for under snare drum (I use a Shure KSM. Note: You may need to invert the phase on the snare bottom mic).

The setup:

Place one large diaphragm condenser two feet above the kit. The diaphragm faces down between the snare and the rack toms. Measure the distance from the center of the snare to the diaphragm and make a note of it (In my case, 38 inches).

Place another large diaphragm condenser the same distance from the center of the snare and six inches above the floor tom. The diaphragm faces the hi hat, across the snare.

Place the third large diaphragm condenser in front of the kit, about three feet away, with the diaphragm facing the kit. You will need to listen to this mic to find the sweet spot for exact placement.

Listen to the three mics. This should sound absolutley killer -- like you can't imagine needing anything else. These three mics will give you 85-95% of your sound.

The mic inside the kick is required and is there to pick up the attack of the beater against the head. If you want to hear kick in your mix, you'll need to have separate control over that. Same with the spot mics for toms. They are optional because the large diaphragm mics are going to give you PLENTY of attack from the toms. The spot mics let you boost the toms slightly if you want to.

The snare mics are there to give you maximum tweek capability during mix. The SM-57 is required, but the underside condenser is optional (some engineers will tell you they hardly ever use the underside mic. I always use it). BUT REMEMBER, the three large diaphragms are the core of your sound. The other mics are there to capture sound you can use to tweek the overall drum sound with, but they should never compete with the three main mics.

Panning:

Pan the first large condenser left (9 o'clock), the second right (3 o'clock), and the third straight up. Pan the kick mic straight up as well. Pan the snare mics either striaght up or SLIGHTLY off-center. Pan the tom mics as they naturally fall in relation to the kit, but do not use extreme panning on the tom mics. Pan everything between 3 and 9 o'clock.

If this setup isn't giving you the best drum sound EVER, then there's something seriously wrong.

EQ:

You should not need to EQ the large diaphram mics at all. You should be able to get everything you need out of your compression settings. EQ the spot mics to enhance, not overtake. Remember that the three large diaphragms are your core sound. They should sound like God right out of the blocks. If they don't, adjust your mic placement and/or drum tuning until they do. You CANNOT "fix-it-in-the-mix" and still have a drum sound that rivals the pros, because the pros always get it perfect during tracking (that's WHY they are pros).



Here is another reference on the subject: http://www.blaxploitation.com/drums/glynJohnsMethod.pdf

Ramble on...
Well I disagree with this a lot because, although this is technically correct, it only works for really well balanced drummers...and saying bashers aren't good enough to record doesn't help most of us who have to record bashers...BTW technically Keith Moon was a basher and not well balanced so one setup deos not work for all esp. the kind of music the OP is working on. I think we all agree that knowing how to get a good sound with minimal micing is important but using the "Glyn Johns" method exclusively is ridiculous and should be only one weapon in your arsenal.

Nick
Old 24th March 2008
  #14
Lives for gear
 

Really like the snare.
I don't think you took too much out of the kick, maybe a less scooped mic would suit the drum, or another (out kik) mic would give you the lo mid oomph to cut through and give it some weight.

Get some weight and power in the kik and a nice buss compressor and you would have a rocking drum sound I think.
Old 24th March 2008
  #15
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There is no ONE WAY to rock

Quote:
Originally Posted by nickynicknick View Post
Well I disagree with this a lot because, although this is technically correct, it only works for really well balanced drummers...and saying bashers aren't good enough to record doesn't help most of us who have to record bashers...BTW technically Keith Moon was a basher and not well balanced so one setup deos not work for all esp. the kind of music the OP is working on. I think we all agree that knowing how to get a good sound with minimal micing is important but using the "Glyn Johns" method exclusively is ridiculous and should be only one weapon in your arsenal.

Nick
Hmmm...I don't believe that I said one should employ the Glyn Johns method exclusively (unless you want that to be your "signature sound"). Our fellow Slut was having some adventures in Drumland and needed some additional perspective. I offered this as a creative option...but also encouraged him to experiment. As far as this technique not working for "Bashers"...I would think that it would be the opposite. Placing all of the sonic burden on your room mics (and not close micing) would be tough on a Charlie Watts, Bernard Purdie or similar player who doesn't SLAM. Bonzo hit about as hard as anyone...and it seemed to work for him. Well...my intent here is not to poke holes in anyone's theory...merely to offer up some ideas to jumpstart his drum sound. Noonansky has been tasked with a Heavy Metal project and this might be a nice perspective on things (since the Glyn Johns technique can really give you a BIG, ballsy sound...so it would seem to be a nice fit for his application).

If anything...he can file the info away and save it for a rainy day when he has a project where the drums absolutely have to sound like "D'yer Maker".
Old 24th March 2008
  #16
Gear Head
 
noonansky's Avatar
 

what i will probably end up doing is recording the drums using that technique and then another one that was mentioned earlier and i will post them both but unfortunately my schedule isnt exactly freed up so it might take a while
thank you for all of your advice and comments guys
Old 24th March 2008
  #17
Gear Guru
 
u b k's Avatar
 

agreed that the kick lacks presence and impact. also the snare is way too boxy for my tastes, eats up too much real estate and lacks the crack i think the song is wanting.

fwiw, when the drums stop for that short breakdown, there's serious level drop on the guitar that distracts me.

song's gotta lot of energy, make sure you get that kick to HAMMER, bring it home!


gregoire
del
ubk
.
Old 24th March 2008
  #18
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noonansky's Avatar
 

yeah that was the point
it drops out and it leads up to the actual breakdown, making it seem so much more dramatic
Old 25th March 2008
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavyG View Post
Hmmm...I don't believe that I said one should employ the Glyn Johns method exclusively (unless you want that to be your "signature sound"). Our fellow Slut was having some adventures in Drumland and needed some additional perspective. I offered this as a creative option...but also encouraged him to experiment. As far as this technique not working for "Bashers"...I would think that it would be the opposite. Placing all of the sonic burden on your room mics (and not close micing) would be tough on a Charlie Watts, Bernard Purdie or similar player who doesn't SLAM. Bonzo hit about as hard as anyone...and it seemed to work for him. Well...my intent here is not to poke holes in anyone's theory...merely to offer up some ideas to jumpstart his drum sound. Noonansky has been tasked with a Heavy Metal project and this might be a nice perspective on things (since the Glyn Johns technique can really give you a BIG, ballsy sound...so it would seem to be a nice fit for his application).

If anything...he can file the info away and save it for a rainy day when he has a project where the drums absolutely have to sound like "D'yer Maker".
Alright Heavy... a couple of things...our OP was asking for mixing advice not mic technique...you just slapped a "if this doesn't work, you are no good" theory on his lap...Glyn Johns is ...well... Glyn Johns...and really this micing technique (which I love) is very limited...re John Bohnam...you are incorrect...in the studio he was a very well balanced player and not a cymbal basher as you have suggested...also close micing is essential in recording music, he must learn to do that as well...why not..instead of regurgitating something someone else said...give him something that you learned to help him get a good close mic sound...because he is working on a style of music where it is essential to close mic...please don't get me wrong, I enjoyed reading about Glyn Johns...just keep your attitude in check..I wasn't bashing you..I was disagreeing with the way it was presented...and finally I'm afraid you are completely wrong when it comes to Room Mics..they work better with a more balanced player like Charlie Watts than a Slammer. BTW I wasn't floating a "theory" that you poked holes in...I gave some suggestions...you floated a theory that wasn't even yours... and I poked holes in it. Maybe you should read the post first before you respond.

Nick
Old 25th March 2008
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noonansky View Post
Recently I recorded a band and it was my first real experience mixing and editing drums....
but i really would just like some pointers on the drum mix.
Here you go Heavy
Old 25th March 2008
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavyG View Post
.. Remember that the three large diaphragms are your core sound. They should sound like God right out of the blocks. If they don't, adjust your mic placement and/or drum tuning until they do. You CANNOT "fix-it-in-the-mix" and still have a drum sound that rivals the pros, because the pros always get it perfect during tracking (that's WHY they are pros).



Here is another reference on the subject: http://www.blaxploitation.com/drums/glynJohnsMethod.pdf

Ramble on...
.."they should sound like God out of the blocks"?...yeah right...it's as easy as that...horrible advice.....
Old 25th March 2008
  #22
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I couldent hear the kick at all and i would say take the toms down alittle beacuse they over power everything else.
Old 25th March 2008
  #23
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The drums sound too wide to me, maybe a little less panning. Also, how much of your snare sound is coming from the OH? If you're getting body there, and are out of mics, I would like to see the snare mic moved to the bottom head (phase reverse). Not enough wires. Is your ceiling really low? If so, move the OHs out in front of the kit...more as room mics. The cymbals seem a little sizzled. Good start though.
Old 25th March 2008
  #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickynicknick View Post
Alright Heavy... a couple of things...our OP was asking for mixing advice not mic technique...you just slapped a "if this doesn't work, you are no good" theory on his lap...Glyn Johns is ...well... Glyn Johns...and really this micing technique (which I love) is very limited...re John Bohnam...you are incorrect...in the studio he was a very well balanced player and not a cymbal basher as you have suggested...also close micing is essential in recording music, he must learn to do that as well...why not..instead of regurgitating something someone else said...give him something that you learned to help him get a good close mic sound...because he is working on a style of music where it is essential to close mic...please don't get me wrong, I enjoyed reading about Glyn Johns...just keep your attitude in check..I wasn't bashing you..I was disagreeing with the way it was presented...and finally I'm afraid you are completely wrong when it comes to Room Mics..they work better with a more balanced player like Charlie Watts than a Slammer. BTW I wasn't floating a "theory" that you poked holes in...I gave some suggestions...you floated a theory that wasn't even yours... and I poked holes in it. Maybe you should read the post first before you respond.

Nick
Hmmm...I merely offered up the Glyn Johns technique as a reference (which I cut and pasted from a website devoted to the technique...those were not my words). I have found it very useful to get that HUGE drum sound that can make a track go from good to great. It is just another tool in the arsenal. If you don't believe in the technique, then you absolutely can disagree with it...that is your right. There is no one way to do it...although I am not sure why anyone would want to poke holes in one of the most amazing drum sounds in recorded history (John Bonham's)...but you must have your reasons. Peace...


BTW...I just finished a session utilizing three condensor overheads (triangle formation, one over the hi hat, one over the ride and one in front of the kit about 10 ft back), one snare mic (paralell to batter head just under the hi hat) and a bass drum mic (just inside the resonant head pointing at the beater)....and the tone was magic.
Old 25th March 2008
  #25
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Take it easy...

Quote:
Originally Posted by nickynicknick View Post
.."they should sound like God out of the blocks"?...yeah right...it's as easy as that...horrible advice.....
What he means is that you shouldn't take the "I'll fix it in the mix" approach...with this technique you should hear instantly if you have your sound dialed in. In the session I did tonight, I could hear in my headphones that the recording was going to be AMAZING. The sound coming through my Beyers was exactly what I heard in the playback...so I can say from experience that you will know when you have found your sweet spot. He wasn't saying to just throw a few mics up and it will sound like GOD...he was saying that you will know before you record if you have found the Holy Grail.

In the end...if you don't want to use a technique that created some of the best drum sounds in history...thats cool. I would love to hear your ideas that evidently will send Glyn Johns scurrying back to the woodshed...
Old 25th March 2008
  #26
Gear Guru
 
u b k's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by noonansky View Post
yeah that was the point
it drops out and it leads up to the actual breakdown, making it seem so much more dramatic

i'm clear on the idea, what i'm saying is that the implementation is distracting.

level drops (dynamics) are essential, but they have to feel right, they have to flow and make sense. the gts drop too much too fast on that breakdown, and the edit is noticeable; the one track that remains needs to be louder, or have more energy in some other way.


gregoire
del
ubk
.
Old 25th March 2008
  #27
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noonansky's Avatar
 

hmm. yeah now that i listen to it again youre definitely right haha
ill keep that in mind from now on
Old 28th March 2008
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavyG View Post
... In the session I did tonight, I could hear in my headphones that the recording was going to be AMAZING. The sound coming through my Beyers was exactly what I heard in the playback...so I can say from experience that you will know when you have found your sweet spot.
I'm just trying to give some realistic advice to our friend here...you just seem to be trying to get him to hire you. Good luck. Maybe you are that good. I don't care.
Old 28th March 2008
  #29
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nickynicknick View Post
I'm just trying to give some realistic advice to our friend here...you just seem to be trying to get him to hire you. Good luck. Maybe you are that good. I don't care.
If tearing down the advice that I gave is "realistic advice"...that is exactly what you did. I am not for hire, either...just a drummer who does recording on the side with my various musical projects. its cool...we have different opinions on the validity of the "Glyn Johns" technique. Now worries...Peace.
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