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Favorite musical "double entendres"? Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 3rd January 2008
  #31
Lives for gear
 
Tommy-boy's Avatar
 

Murray Head's Bankok sounds like it's all about sex, but it's about chess!
Old 3rd January 2008
  #32
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by doorknocker View Post
Well, I don't have it on CD or record but I definitely heard Sinatra do it with 'clean' lyrics, I'm sure that he recorded it more than once though.

When was 'your' version done?
Cocaine, not Perfume from Spain in both of these collections.

Classic Sinatra
and
The Very Good Years
Old 3rd January 2008
  #33
Gear Maniac
 

Frank Sinatra: The Very Good Years
Personnel includes: Frank Sinatra (vocals); Bill Miller (piano); Count Basie & His Orchestra. Recorded between 1960 & 1979. Includes liner notes by William Kennedy. Contains selections from the "Reprise Years" box set. A single-disc distillation of the stellar four-disc REPRISE COLLECTION, this album spans the breadth of Frank Sinatra's work for Reprise Records, the label he founded in 1961 to further his artistic and financial freedom. Despite the enormous success Sinatra found in his early career, it was in the early '60s that he reached a real peak in his singing. His voice and phrasing had both ripened to a rewarding maturity, and the sophisticated arrangements of Nelson Riddle and Gordon Jenkins helped Sinatra to merge saloon song with art song, thus creating some of the most richly textured, finely nuanced "pop" recordings ever made. The brassy swing of "I Get a Kick out of You" and "Luck Be a Lady" show the sheer enthusiasm Sinatra was capable of not only investing but creating on a track. "Strangers in the Night" and "Send in the Clowns" focus on very "grown-up" themes that suited the singer's newly acquired vocal gravitas. "The Summer Wind" and "That's Life" showcase Sinatra's mastery of blending romance, nostalgia, and bitter-sweetness to achieve an emotional complexity hitherto unparalleled in pop music.
Old 3rd January 2008
  #34
Gear Maniac
 

Frank Sinatra: Classic Sinatra
Personnel includes: Frank Sinatra (vocals); Nelson Riddle, Billy May (arranger, conductor). Recorded between 1953 and 1960. Includes liner notes by Bruce Springsteen and Pete Hamill. Digitally remastered using 24-bit technology by Bob Norberg (Capitol Mastering). Sinatra's years on the Capitol label (1953-60) were great years. His voice had matured into a powerful and poignant instrument; his sense of swing was infallible; and he was blessed with an innovative and sophisticated arranger, Nelson Riddle, whose charts fit Sinatra like a beautiful suit. This one-disc compilation of 20 songs includes many classics: "I've Got You Under My Skin," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "The Lady Is a Tramp," In The Wee Small Hours of the Morning," and "One For My Baby (And One More For the Road)." The packaging is attractive (with some great photos of Sinatra) and the digital re-mastering was done right. Also included are updated versions of songs Sinatra sang in his earlier years ("Oh! Look At Me Now," and "Night and Day").
Old 3rd January 2008
  #35
Lives for gear
 
doorknocker's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesman714 View Post
Cocaine, not Perfume from Spain in both of these collections.

Classic Sinatra
and
The Very Good Years
That's interesting! But there's definitely a 'Spanish' version too, several web sites discuss it:

"I Get A Kick Out Of You"
In 1953, Frank Sinatra records this tune originally written by Cole Porter for the 1934 Broadway musical, "Anything Goes" (Ol' Blue Eyes has a hit with his version the following year of 1954). For radio airplay, Capital records has Sinatra change the perceived drug reference "I get no kick from cocaine," to "I get perfume from Spain."
Submitted by: Peter
Old 3rd January 2008
  #36
Gear Guru
 
henryrobinett's Avatar
In terms of classic sexual double entendres blues and rhythm and blues s full of them, of course. The original, Big Joe Turner's version of "Shake, Rattle and Roll," is classic. "Like a one eyed cat (for years I thought it was 'one eyed jack') starin' in a seafood store."

Or less obvious is Aretha Franklins "Freeway of Love" - "Goin' ridin' on the freeway of love In my pink cadillac."
Old 3rd January 2008
  #37
Lives for gear
 
Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
?? What's this a reference to? I've got Gentle Giant's Octopus album but "rd lang" doesn't ring a bell at all.
KNOTS
A trademark piece for Gentle Giant, this standout piece from "Octopus" features masterful 4-part vocal counterpoint, a xylophone solo, and an almost metal-like hook. Inspired by the knot-like riddles of R.D. Lang. The album's liner notes proclaim it to be a "modern-day madrigal".

All in all each man in all men
All men in each man.
He can see she can't, she can see
she can
see whatever, whatever.
You may know what I don't know,
but not that
I don't know it and I can't tell you
so you will.

To tell me all man in all men
All men in each man.
He can see she can't, she can see
she can
see whatever, whatever.
You may know what I don't know,
but not that
I don't know it and I can't tell you
so you will have to tell me all.

It hurts him to think that she is
hurting her by him being hurt to think
that she thinks he is hurt by making her
feel guilty at hurting him by her thinking
she wants him to want her. Her wants
her to
want him to get him to want him to get
him to want her she pretends.

He tries to make her afraid by not
being afraid. (permutations)

You may know what I don't know, but not
that I don't know it and I can't
tell you so you will have to tell
me all.

I get what I deserve. I deserve what I
get. I have it so I deserve it. I deserve
it for I have it. I get what I deserve.
What I deserve - what I deserve what
I get.
I have it so I deserve.

He tries to make her afraid by not
being afraid.
Old 3rd January 2008
  #38
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by henryrobinett View Post
In terms of classic sexual double entendres blues and rhythm and blues s full of them, of course. The original, Big Joe Turner's version of "Shake, Rattle and Roll," is classic. "Like a one eyed cat (for years I thought it was 'one eyed jack') starin' in a seafood store."

Or less obvious is Aretha Franklins "Freeway of Love" - "Goin' ridin' on the freeway of love In my pink cadillac."
Bill Haley sang "Shake Rattle & Roll" the same way. Funny, I was trying to think of that when I first saw this thread but all I came up with was a generic thought of the KRLA/"American Graffiti" era rock 'n roll...
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