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removing fret click from a bass track Dynamics Plugins
Old 9th September 2007
  #1
Gear Head
 

removing fret click from a bass track

Often I can live with or even like fret noise, slaps etc. from the bass (electric or upright) but on this particular session it's distracting. I have done an EQ sweep to find the offensive frequencies and using the SonyOxford EQ I can make some headway (at a sonic cost of course) but I am wondering if anyone has any tricks or tips beyond EQing. Is there a plug-in or something that could help? I am not sure this is the best site to discuss this issue so if anyone can suggest another forum that would be cool. Thanks.

Scot
Old 9th September 2007
  #2
Lives for gear
 

instead of EQ'ing out the offending frequency, try throwing on a multiband comp...smash the crap out of the offending frequencies, and leave the rest untouched
Old 9th September 2007
  #3
Gear Head
 

Thanks. Great suggestion. What multiband comp do you suggest?
Old 9th September 2007
  #4
Lives for gear
 
BLueROom's Avatar
 

depending on how bad it is, I've used a de-esser and had good results.
Old 9th September 2007
  #5
Gear Head
 

Cool... I am loading up the session now to try it.
Old 9th September 2007
  #6
Gear Head
 

Thanks BLue.... The De-Esser is useful!! I only have the Digirack plug. What are some good alternatives?

S
Old 9th September 2007
  #7
Lives for gear
 
BLueROom's Avatar
 

spitfish by digitalfishphones = free
UAD Precision multi-band
Old 9th September 2007
  #8
Gear Maniac
 

If it's really a sharp click, you may be able to draw it out of the waveform by hand.
Old 9th September 2007
  #9
Lives for gear
 

Just go through it (in the track rather than solo'd) and manually duck the offending clicks with level automation, much as you would do if you were manually de-essing. That way you're not using anything that's going to affect the bass in any other way.

J
Old 9th September 2007
  #10
Lives for gear
 
Black Seal's Avatar
 

voxengo gliss eq

Dynamic eq might work, but I guess that pretty close to what a desser could do.
Old 10th September 2007
  #11
Gear Head
 

Thanks all!!! Combining the suggestions above has yielded a very usable track.

thumbsup
Old 10th September 2007
  #12
Lives for gear
If it's just fret clicking you are having trouble with, loading it into Adobe Audition and using the built in click/pop remover will COMPLETELY get rid of it with no adverse effects.
Old 22nd January 2015
  #13
Gear Head
 

here's a better way

I'm honestly against using de-poppers or de-clickers. they're pretty destructive at times. there are cases where they're the best thing to use like if you're re-mastering vinyl or something but here's a less destructive way:

use something like Izotope RX4 and instead of using the de-clicker or whatever use the "spectral repair tool"

go to the tab that says "replace"

find where the click or pop is in the song...
usually it'll show up as a vertical line that's obvious and easy to see... if not you need to just use trial and error to find it...

highlight that line using either the pen tool or the square highlight tool...

now go in your spectral repair tool and experiment with the different settings. whether you should focus it before or after the click depends on the situation so try both.
also experiment with the band level... higher bands will have a stronger effect but usually you only need a tiny touch to get rid of one of these..
do it right and you won't even be able to hear that anything was done to fix the track.
I'm explaining this from memory so sorry for using wrong terms.

It's pretty easy to use though so I recommend everyone learn their way around the spectral repair tools. they have a million and one uses. you can even use pattern replace mode for stuff like tremolo strings where there's a pattern. attenuation mode can be used for just about anything. I use it often to fix problems that occur when too many frequencies are stacked on top of each other post master so i don't have to sacrifice dynamic range with compression. Just don't forget to set it to 24 bit if you're using 24 bit waves or if you want to use it in 32 bit float mode make sure you dither when exporting it.

also if you ever end up getting a low rattling sound on something like bass, doublebass, contrabass, cello, etc that can usually be fixed using the 2nd thing I mentioned above: attenuation.... I find those problems usually occur in and around 100hz so near the very bottom... sometimes even like around 60 if it's really low. all depends but if you try to use attenuation to fix that keep it very light... like a .4 strength setting, maybe 256 or 512 band, usually horizontal works best, etc. if you do that too heavily it'll sound muted. do it so lightly that you can't even barely see the difference in the wave and that usually works to fix it or improve it but really those types of problems should be dealt with as an individual track pre-master. still worth mentioning though.

spectral repairs made my life a lot easier. couldn't suggest it more. It both works better and is less destructive than declickers, depoppers, decracklers etc
you don't even need to buy an advanced version of RX4 to get this.
it comes with the basic light version

Last edited by psychosis; 22nd January 2015 at 07:35 PM..
Old 22nd January 2015
  #14
I'd try a transient designer— see if you can pull out some attack to deemphasize the clicks while retaining the body of the sound.

Then once somewhat improved, you may have to use auto to deal with the remaining offenders that jump out in the mix.
Old 22nd January 2015
  #15
Lives for gear
 
Granny Gremlin's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironklad Audio View Post
instead of EQ'ing out the offending frequency, try throwing on a multiband comp...smash the crap out of the offending frequencies, and leave the rest untouched
You don't need a multiband comp, you can use any comp with sidechain EQ (boost the offending freqs ). .... This is pretty much how (most) de-essers work, except you can adjust the frequency (not all de-essers allow you to do that, and when they do it's usually a limited range).

The best way is to set the bass up properly to begin with (nobody bothers with fret dressings anymore), vs trying to polish a turd later, but that's not helpful after the fact. Using flats (vs roundwound strings) helps a lot too - especially if recording DI.

... and if you're getting fret noise on an upright, find better musicians.
Old 23rd January 2015
  #16
Lives for gear
 

I have a feeling this guy was using a Musicman Stingray which are notorious for click and finger noise. Miking the cab in those situations helps a lot as opposed to using a DI sound.
A nice litte eq notch somewhere between 2.5 and 5 khz should help if you can't re-track.
Old 23rd January 2015
  #17
Lives for gear
I've recorded a few bassists who like to play what I call "sub bass", where they take all the mids and highs out of the amp. When you pull a direct out feed, you'll get a full range sound. Unfortunately there will be terrible spikes and etc when you try to make these players' bass audible in a recording.

Taking the highs out lets them play with less attention to their technique, and they'll probably play sloppy, and randomly get some spikes in weird places. I try to educate these guys, but they "love their sound" which is not gonna be heard in a recording lol.

the thing that usually works is go over it note by note and fix it manually. Split every note, change its attack and volume. It's tedious. 1-3 hours depending on how many notes. While your there, might as well move every bass note to fit in the lull right behind the attack of the kick. It works, and since it was gonna be a turd anyway, no reason not to move it.

Other things, ...duplicate your track. Hi pass one, low pass the other. Compress the hi-track to smack those peaks, use EQ to make t sound better etc..
Lows a different comp setting. Eq.

Maybe duplicate it again and feed a unprocessed track in the mix.

Good luck
Old 23rd January 2015
  #18
Lives for gear
+1 for Adobe Audition. There's also something called ClickRepair -- awesome bit of software. Clicks are just .. gone, with zero adverse affects

haa this thread is from '07.

Last edited by goldi; 23rd January 2015 at 07:04 AM.. Reason: haa this thread is from '07
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