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Monitor placement/angle/ differences? Channel Strip Plugins
Old 3rd September 2007
  #1
Lives for gear
 

Monitor placement/angle/ differences?

Was wondering about monitor placement.

How do you place and angle them?

3 feet apart? 6 feet apart?

How high? Do you like them placed higher, and angled downward?

Or do you like them lower, with a straight on angle?

Is there a sonic advantage to one or the other, or is it all preference?

Im used to having them rather low, but im shopping for a workstation/desk
and they all seem to have the shelf which the monitors will presumably
sitting on , quite a bit higher than i prefer.
I do have Mopads, so i could angle them (adams A7's) downward.
Just not sure if im gonna like that or not.

Now that im thinking of it, please reccomend any workstation/desks
that you find functional, at a good price. (under 600.00usd)
Im looking at the Omnirax Presto, but that shelf looks awful high

Hard to find any good ones with adjustable shelf hieghth.

Thanks so much for any and all input!!

TK
Old 3rd September 2007
  #2
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tomdarude's Avatar
who came up with that awful idea of these monitor-shelfs anyway ??

NS10´s on the meterbridge....okay....if you want them there, just do it....
but IMHO. if you buy a desk for a control-room:

1) make it as small as possible
2) take a close look to where the first reflexion points on the desk are gonna happen
and where they are directed towards (take a closer look at the sterling modular consoles and how they do this.... their form is for a reason!!)
3) no shelf

4) get some heavy duty badass speaker-stands, fill them with sand, watch out for resonating parts...no mo-pads needed

5) experiment with monitor placement !!!



I´ve done this often, and in many places with friends studios etc. the differences that happen if you experiment with my 5 points above........are at least of THE SAME importance as the model/brand of speaker you use !!
many people buy a monitor, put it up somewhere and wonder why it sounds different than in their friends room.......it´s all in the detail...and there´s no way aroun physics & acoustics!

cheers tom
Old 4th September 2007
  #3
Gear Guru
 
Ethan Winer's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd View Post
How do you place and angle them?
Tweeters should be at ear level. Always.

Quote:
3 feet apart? 6 feet apart?
How large is your room?

Quote:
Is there a sonic advantage to one or the other, or is it all preference?
All speakers have a different response off axis than on axis, which is why they should not be angled down.

More info here:

RealTraps - How To Set Up a Room

--Ethan
Old 4th September 2007
  #4
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PheelTheMusic's Avatar
 

Ethan -

The shelf for monitors on my studio desk is about 3" to 5" too high for my tweeters to be at ear level. I have compensated for this by angling the monitors down towards me slightly, resulting in the tweeters being perfectly directed at my ears. I have read here that angling monitors down is not good practice, but if the alternative is having the tweeters shooting 3 to 5" over my head, which is the lesser of two evils?
Old 5th September 2007
  #5
Lives for gear
My monitors are not ear level. They sounded like **** that way. I raised them and angled them down. Sounds much much much better. Sometimes you just have to do what sounds better to you.
Old 5th September 2007
  #6
Gear Guru
 
Ethan Winer's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PheelTheMusic View Post
The shelf for monitors on my studio desk is about 3" to 5" too high for my tweeters to be at ear level.
What if you put them upside down? That's what I did with my NS-10s, and that worked out perfectly. If that makes them too low you can stick a book or (better) a thin cardboard box under the speakers. I say better because a cardboard box will decouple the speakers which is often useful.

--Ethan
Old 5th September 2007
  #7
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HIGHENDONLY's Avatar
 

How far should monitors be away from the wall. I have mine 2 feet away from the back wall. Is that still too close?? I know they say if your monitors are too close to the wall, it will be hard to find your center in your stereo image.
Old 6th September 2007
  #8
Gear Guru
 
Ethan Winer's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HIGHENDONLY View Post
How far should monitors be away from the wall. I have mine 2 feet away from the back wall. Is that still too close?? I know they say if your monitors are too close to the wall, it will be hard to find your center in your stereo image.
Imaging is not related to this distance. What's affected most is bass response, and the only way to know what placement is best is to measure at a high resolution. You can use either test tones like THESE on my company's site, or software like ETF (Windows), FuzzMeasure (Macs), or Room EQ Wizard (works with both platforms.)

--Ethan
Old 23rd April 2008
  #9
Gear Nut
 

I'd like to bump this thread w/ a new related question rather than start a new thread altogether.

In my room, I think I do everything that's been recommended & get great results. I have my speakers shooting into the long part of my room, about 33% into my room from the wall shooting into the long 67%; Speakers are equidistant to each other as well as to myself in my typical position; height is set so that ear level is right between tweet & woof. My console is for pres only (ITB guy here) so it's off to the side of my room not generating a reflective surface right below my monitors & it is balanced off w/ desk on the other side of the room. It's pretty balanced & sounds great to me.

My question is, a friend just mentioned to me over the phone today that he re-positioned (or re-angled) my speakers in my room (I'm our of town right now) so that the speakers shoot straight back in my room instead of slightly inward towards the listening position. He said it removes the speakers sounds' directionality & makes it feel more like he is "in the mix" & the stereo imaging is better & that I should start using them that way. He finds it funny that as anally meticulous as I can be, that he might have found an improvement for me that I overlooked.

I'll try it for myself when I get back in town but I was curious, is this wrong or stupid thinking? I read everything I could & followed closely to monitor placement advice & can't believe I'd have missed that detail in my setup. What would ya'll do? I'd love to hear Ethan's take also if he might happen to poke back in here.

Thanks ya'll
Old 23rd April 2008
  #10
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Kronos147's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan Winer View Post
You can use either test tones like THESE on my company's site, or software like ETF (Windows), FuzzMeasure (Macs), or Room EQ Wizard (works with both platforms.)

--Ethan
Wow, great article/resource/post there, sir. You have my thanks. I want to get one of those Radio Shack meters and check that stuff out.

A long long time ago I had the JBL Smartwhatever system here with a competent operator and I found that I had to push my rig/speakers way back from the wall to avoid a mode. I have changed speakers since and will use your method to see what is really there.


Sound Fella, I would ask your friend if that works for everything or just that song. I would say that the off axis frequency generation of the speakers are more what your friend likes to hear, or maybe the other set up has too much overlap.

But, if you were happy, and your mixes translated well to other places (cars, computers, boom boxes....) then let your friend mix the way he likes, and move the speakers back when he is done.
Old 23rd April 2008
  #11
Gear Guru
 
Ethan Winer's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSoundFella View Post
so that the speakers shoot straight back in my room instead of slightly inward towards the listening position. He said it removes the speakers sounds' directionality & makes it feel more like he is "in the mix" & the stereo imaging is better
I disagree with that advice. The listener needs to be on axis with the speakers (tweeters) to get the most accurate frequency response. Good imaging is all about eliminating early reflections from the side walls and ceiling with absorption.

--Ethan
Old 26th April 2008
  #12
Gear Nut
 

Hey, thanks a bunch for the replies guys.

Yeah, got home yesterday & tried it out myself, didn't like it. It's different & I'm used to what works well for me. Seemed to seperate the stereo image too much & made me feel "outside the mix", actually.

It seemed (to me) to act opposite from what my fellow fella suggested - of course we're always playfully knocking each other for our different techniques. For example, I often like mixing drums from drummer's perspective; him: crowd - First comment when critiquing each other's mixes is that the HH is on the wrong side

Thanks again for poking in w/ your takes Ethan & Kronos
Old 26th April 2008
  #13
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