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How To Diagnose Monitors/Speakers That Have Been Damaged By Excessive Low End Boost?
Old 30th August 2007
  #1
Deleted #29233
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How To Diagnose Monitors/Speakers That Have Been Damaged By Excessive Low End Boost?

Something that I myself and I'm sure at least a few other people would like to know, is how to diagnose a speaker that's been damaged by excessive low frequency (below 50hz) boost. What are the common "symptoms"/"characteristics"?

Anyone have any facts or ideas on this?
Old 30th August 2007
  #2


The suspension (spider and surround) can get deformed.

In some designs, the voice coil can bottom out on the back plate and cause some defomation of the coil former. This can cause rubbing.

The DCR of the voice coil will sometimes change. And sometimes the laquer on the voice coil wire will charr or bubble. Both of these can be caused by excessive power or a DC offset in the amp output. The charred laquer will often rub.

Did you hear a change in sound? Or are you just being parinoid?





-tINY

Old 30th August 2007
  #3
Easy. They say "Pro Ac" on the front.
Old 31st August 2007
  #4
Deleted #29233
Guest
Lol Mike....
ANyways no I didn't notice anything out of the ordinary.... I guess i was just being paranoid. BUT I'd still like to know what to look for. I don't exactly know what a damaged speaker sounds like... or do I? That is... a speaker that's been damaged by Excessive Low End Boost (Lower than 50Hz). SoundOnSound's EQ Guide describes clearly states that speakers/monitors "can and will" be damaged by excessive Boost in this range without the use of very high quality monitors. If this kind of damage did occur, what might the speakers/monitors sound like?

anyone?
Old 31st August 2007
  #5
Gear Guru
 
u b k's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by owendolmer View Post
If this kind of damage did occur, what might the speakers/monitors sound like?

ass.

the easiest way to tell a blown woofer is by playing bass heavy music at very quiet volumes; the woofer will rub the piston and the sound will be very noticeable (and very annoying).


gregoire
del
ubk
.
Old 31st August 2007
  #6
Deleted #29233
Guest
Thanks!
Very Helpful Info!...
Old 31st August 2007
  #7
Well there's also what I call the cracked stage. Damaged, but sounds still comes out.

I like the ProAcs but the blow very easily. My right woofer makes a low grinding sound with low frequencies at low volumes. If I crank the volume it doesn't happen. This is the sound they make when they've been damage, but not blown and if I cnrank them hard enough, it will definitely blow.

I'm not sure if other woofers work this way.
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