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large and small diaphram condensers. differences? Condenser Microphones
Old 22nd August 2007
  #1
Gear Addict
 
bendecido's Avatar
 

large and small diaphram condensers. differences?

Well where do i start
I am considering buying either a gefell m930 large diaphram condenser or a gefell m300 smal diaphram condenser for the main purpose of rap vocals.
I am looking for a tight focused compressed kinda sound similar to early hip-hop albums like Nas- Illmatic, Jay-z- Reasonable Doubt, Wu- Tang -36 Chambers etc. If any of you are familiar with them.
I have a couple of questions.

What are the differences soundwise between large and small diaphram condensers?

Will a small diaphram condenser give me a tighter more compressed kinda sound due to the smaller frequency range?

Will a small diaphram condenser be better in an untreated room using only an se reflection filter (since it doesnt pick up as much)?

and finally Has anyone had any experience or heard of small diaphram condensers being used for hip-hop vocals?

Sorry if there are too many questions

thanks and many blessings

Bendecido
Old 22nd August 2007
  #2
Gear Nut
 
liuto's Avatar
 

Hi!
This topic has been discussed quite a few times here. In short, there are physical and psychological issues:
Small: more accurate, neutral, faster impulse response, more consistant polar pattern, more noise; less impressive.
Large: more colour, slower impulse response, polar pattern changing with frequency, less noise; more impressive looking.
Of course there are noisy LDs and quiet SDs around.

You might find these topics useful:

Why would anyone want to use a large diaphragm condenser???

Difference small and large diaphragm mics

Large capsule, more bass?

Drum OH: small versus large diaphragm mics

differences between ld mics and sd mics

Large/Small Diaphragm for OH?

Best regards
Hermann
Old 22nd August 2007
  #3


If you are seriously thinking about spending that much money on a vocal mic, you should try to rent or borrow a few mics first - see what works for the voices you are recording. Where you set it up is going to be very important too.

You might find that an SM7 or a PR30 or even an AT4033 work better for you. Even though the Gefell is a much more expensive mic - voices are funny that way.




-tINY

Old 22nd August 2007
  #4
Gear Addict
 
bendecido's Avatar
 

Thanks for all th link definetly worthwile info. just one question
Quote:
Originally Posted by liuto View Post
Hi!
This topic has been discussed quite a few times here. In short, there are physical and psychological issues:
Small: more accurate, neutral, faster impulse response, [
by faster impulse response do you mean more punchy (for example less atack time).
If so this would be perfect for hip hop. The punchier you can get the vocals the better (at least for me)

Quote:
Originally Posted by tINY View Post


If you are seriously thinking about spending that much money on a vocal mic, you should try to rent or borrow a few mics first - see what works for the voices you are recording. Where you set it up is going to be very important too.

You might find that an SM7 or a PR30 or even an AT4033 work better for you. Even though the Gefell is a much more expensive mic - voices are funny that way.




-tINY

I have a peluso 22 251 and the reason im thinking of a SDC is because i have an untreated room and only use an SE reflection filter. I was under the impression an SDC would pick up less of the room. I use to have an sm7. Wasnt a big fan of it- sounded a little too dull and woofy to me imho. i definetly need another condenser just which type is the question

thanks and blessings to all
Old 23rd August 2007
  #5


If you are trying to use an untreated room, then any mic with a hyper- super-cardioid pattern will probably help.

the PR30 is worth a try - it's a super cardioid with a lot of punch and a well-controlled pattern. Inteligibility is good too.



-tINY

Old 23rd August 2007
  #6
Gear Nut
 
liuto's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bendecido View Post
by faster impulse response do you mean more punchy (for example less atack time).
If so this would be perfect for hip hop. The punchier you can get the vocals the better (at least for me)
I am not sure but I don't think punchy and fast impulse response are necessarily the same. Both terms have to do with the way transients are handled but whereas "fast impulse response" simply means that the membrane is following the sound wave very quickly (accurately) "punchy" seems to refer to a more processed sound. So if the singer has a punchy voice, the SD will record it that way, if you want to add a punchy note to a voice I'd rather use an LD or maybe dynamic mic. Please bear in mind also, that I mostly record classical music (with SDs) so "punchy" for you may be a totally different idea. So these are more theoretical reflections.
Regards
Hermann
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