The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Pergo, Dupont Laminate or Parque for studio flooring? Consoles
Old 15th August 2007
  #1
Pergo, Dupont Laminate or Parque for studio flooring?

For use on an existing concrete slab/floor. I know parque has been in the standard category for a long time and it requires gluing. While it's less expensive than the other options the gluing install makes it a more labor intensive choice.
The Laminates cost a little more but are easier and cheaper to install.
Any downsides to the laminates that anyone has experienced?
Old 15th August 2007
  #2
Lives for gear
 
lowfreq33's Avatar
 

Laminates are okay as long as you go with one that's all wood. The ones with a layer of plastic on top that looks like wood will scratch horribly when someone drags their gear across it.
Old 15th August 2007
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowfreq33 View Post
Laminates are okay as long as you go with one that's all wood. The ones with a layer of plastic on top that looks like wood will scratch horribly when someone drags their gear across it.
I thought the laminates i.e. pergo, were supposed to be more durable than wood?
Old 15th August 2007
  #4
Lives for gear
 
DSD_Mastering's Avatar
I used the thickest laminate that I could find (3/4" Bellawood). It's a floating floor so you have to glue it together. I can install about 400sq/ft in a weekend. It's very durable and the thicker stuff will allow for refinishing a couple of times.

Regards,
Bruce
Old 15th August 2007
  #5
I used a real wood parquet. Looks nice and works well. It does ding and scuff a bit, so I'm somewhat careful.
Old 15th August 2007
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz View Post
I thought the laminates i.e. pergo, were supposed to be more durable than wood?
they have to be floated and a decent distance off the walls jim or they warp. they can scratch and when the do it ain't like you can sand and refinish

i went with 3/4 inch bruce on top of glued and screwed [one 2.5 inch wood screw per 6 inches] 1/4 inch plywood over the homes 1 inch pine planking over the massive 1920 era joists
Old 15th August 2007
  #7
Lives for gear
 
Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowfreq33 View Post
Laminates are okay as long as you go with one that's all wood. The ones with a layer of plastic on top that looks like wood will scratch horribly when someone drags their gear across it.
wood lams are bad too because one gouge and your into the cheapo underlayment..i think instead of the 3/4 bruce oak i woud do maple or bamboo if i had another chance..much stronger
Old 15th August 2007
  #8
Gear Maniac
 

On top of concrete go with a engineered floor material (floating prefered)

At least 5 layer engineered.
Old 15th August 2007
  #9
Lives for gear
 
lowfreq33's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
wood lams are bad too because one gouge and your into the cheapo underlayment..i think instead of the 3/4 bruce oak i woud do maple or bamboo if i had another chance..much stronger
I'm talking about the ones that have basically a sticker on top. I occasionally work for a guy who took the lowest bid for his studio buildout. The contractor used the cheapest flooring he could find, and 6 months later the floors look horrible.
Old 15th August 2007
  #10
Dan
Lives for gear
 
Dan's Avatar
 

Yeah, I have the fake laminate flooring in a project studio. Gotta say it's a bad idea, and doesn't wear well.

Be good with wood.
Old 15th August 2007
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
wood lams are bad too because one gouge and your into the cheapo underlayment..i think instead of the 3/4 bruce oak i woud do maple or bamboo if i had another chance..much stronger
I have a small editing/overdub room with bamboo flooring. PITA.
Do not like at all. Very hard to keep clean. Maybe maple.
Old 16th August 2007
  #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
they have to be floated and a decent distance off the walls jim or they warp. they can scratch and when the do it ain't like you can sand and refinish

i went with 3/4 inch bruce on top of glued and screwed [one 2.5 inch wood screw per 6 inches] 1/4 inch plywood over the homes 1 inch pine planking over the massive 1920 era joists
I was going to go with parque as I see it in many rooms. But it is thin and since it has to be glued down I'm concerned there will always be issues. I'll look into 3/4" Bruce. I have pergo in my laundry room and garage entrance way at home. I do remember the installers saying there had to be a 1/4 gap around the edges. There are a couple of pads you can use underneath the pergo. Salesman at Home Depot showed me the laminates from Dupont. Told me they were better than Pergo.
Unfortunately, I'm on concrete so there is no existing wood flooring in place that I can build up on.
Old 16th August 2007
  #13
Gear Maniac
 

i have pergo in vox booth. mine is also on concrete slab, over the blue styrofoam and plastic moisture barrier. it just sits on top as i knew it would not be permanent till i figured out a better solution. it was hard to wedge in, but the stuff does bend.

overall, i'd say it looks and feels a tad cheap, not horribly so, but the larger area you do the cheaper it will look.

i swear it sounds like there's plastic on the floor and not wood. easy to install, it snaps together, but if i was doing it over again i'd rethink. i'd rather have something that sounds like hardwood.

what i would suggest, if you're looking for a less permanent solution than building a whole floor on top of the floor (the correct way to do it) is moisture barrier > engineered board > parquet floor glued to the boards
Old 16th August 2007
  #14
Thanks to everyone for their experiences and advice. There's never a freakin easy solution is there!
The part I really dislike is the fact that I'm leasing. It's not my building.
So if I'm taking this in (not being handy with a hammer at all) it appears I should
- lay moisture barrier on top of the concrete slab > lay an engineered or plywood floor > parque or 3/4 hardwood (to be determined) on top. Sound about right?

My main concern is the cutting room. which is 20' x 23' 7".
Old 16th August 2007
  #15
We had Pergo in our small tracking room, that we are no longer in, from 1999-2003. We had the higher end Pergo, looked a lot like wood...I don't even think reputable stores like Home Depot sell the stuff with a 'sticker wood grain' on top. There are a lot of different quality levels, some are very expensive. It always sounded good. I think bass trapping and defeating early reflections (but still leaving the room as open as possible) is more important than quality Pergo versus wood. Some of the new Pergo that I've looked at recently on display at the store looks really great, it's improved even more in the last 8 years since we last purchased any. We have epoxy coated cement in our new tracking room, also sounds great. If you can afford wood, go for it, but otherwise don't be afraid of the alternatives IMHO.
Old 16th August 2007
  #16
Lives for gear
 
Eganmedia's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz View Post
Thanks to everyone for their experiences and advice. There's never a freakin easy solution is there!
The part I really dislike is the fact that I'm leasing. It's not my building.
So if I'm taking this in (not being handy with a hammer at all) it appears I should
- lay moisture barrier on top of the concrete slab > lay an engineered or plywood floor > parque or 3/4 hardwood (to be determined) on top. Sound about right?

My main concern is the cutting room. which is 20' x 23' 7".
If you have an existing concrete floor, check out Kemiko concrete stains ( you can see examples of my live room and a bunch of others at www.fmdesign.com). Mine has been in for 6+ years and looks great - way better than the wood flooring in my control room. I have a lot of wood on the walls and ceilings for its sound, and I throw area rugs around when the concrete is too harsh. But overall, it sounds great, wears like iron, and looks really good. People always ask me what the floor is made of. If applied well, it doesn't look like concrete at all.
Old 16th August 2007
  #17
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz View Post
Thanks to everyone for their experiences and advice. There's never a freakin easy solution is there!
The part I really dislike is the fact that I'm leasing. It's not my building.
So if I'm taking this in (not being handy with a hammer at all) it appears I should
- lay moisture barrier on top of the concrete slab > lay an engineered or plywood floor > parque or 3/4 hardwood (to be determined) on top. Sound about right?

My main concern is the cutting room. which is 20' x 23' 7".
sounds like a quick and easy.

if you're at or below ground i would make sure that the subfloor wood be a material that won't mold easily should it get wet. You should be careful when looking at wood composites - OSB (Oriented Strand Board) should probabaly be avoided - it does not dry out well and is a mold magnet.

Unless you can get a composite board treated to be specifically mold resistant, which i hear are out. Otherwise, Douglas fir plywood might be a better alternative, and treated plywood even better. If its in a basement then you should definitely get somethihng mold resistant. Probabaly up to whats in stock at home depot.
Old 16th August 2007
  #18
Thanks. It's not a basement. It's a single story building so I'm at ground level. Good point about mold resistant subfloor. I'll look into this.
Quote:
Originally Posted by melodic_disaster View Post
sounds like a quick and easy.

if you're at or below ground i would make sure that the subfloor wood be a material that won't mold easily should it get wet. You should be careful when looking at wood composites - OSB (Oriented Strand Board) should probabaly be avoided - it does not dry out well and is a mold magnet.

Unless you can get a composite board treated to be specifically mold resistant, which i hear are out. Otherwise, Douglas fir plywood might be a better alternative, and treated plywood even better. If its in a basement then you should definitely get somethihng mold resistant. Probabaly up to whats in stock at home depot.
Old 16th August 2007
  #19
Gear Maniac
 
TTatman's Avatar
 

We went with Bruce "engineered" oak flooring as specified by our designer. 3000 sq. ft. of it glued to the concrete slabs. No regrets at all. Still looks great after 5 years of rock bands day in, day out. He also said that Pergo "sounds like plastic."

http://catamountrecording.com/
Old 16th August 2007
  #20
Lives for gear
 

+1 for the "Pergo sounds like ****". Plastic ****ty high freq **** that sounds like ****. Did I say ****ty? I meant ****TY!!

I had it in one of my studios and tore it out after 6 months. Replaced it with cheap pine, which sounded great but wore badly.
Old 16th August 2007
  #21
Looks like a general disdain for Pergo-like laminates. It's not wood, it's an engineered veneer...I can understand how it might sound like plastic. I'm over it.
Thinking hard about a subfloor with 3/4" hard wood glued on top.
Have to investigate price/performance with this against gluing parguet to the slab.
Thanks for the responses.
Old 17th August 2007
  #22
Lives for gear
 

I just recently put in some pergo type wood flooring in my control room and it feels so cheap, especially with the pad underneath. It makes the floor compress a little when you walk on it. I feel like it really made the control room feel cheap.
Old 17th August 2007
  #23
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eganmedia View Post
If you have an existing concrete floor, check out Kemiko concrete stains ( you can see examples of my live room and a bunch of others at www.fmdesign.com). Mine has been in for 6+ years and looks great - way better than the wood flooring in my control room. I have a lot of wood on the walls and ceilings for its sound, and I throw area rugs around when the concrete is too harsh. But overall, it sounds great, wears like iron, and looks really good. People always ask me what the floor is made of. If applied well, it doesn't look like concrete at all.
How much does it cost to have proffesionally done?
Old 17th August 2007
  #24
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz View Post
Thinking hard about a subfloor with 3/4" hard wood glued on top.
Have to investigate price/performance with this against gluing parguet to the slab.
Depending on how uneven the floor is you might need to start with a leveling compound, then some kind of moisture/vapor seal... then install the subfloor. Since your leasing the space, maybe mount the parquet to some kind of removable subfloor so you can take it with you at some point down the road...

I've been in and even built a few rooms for people where we used 3/4" furniture grade plywood as the finish floor...with about 15-20 THICK coats of poly. Looks great. Sounds good. Wears really well too...
Old 17th August 2007
  #25
Thanks Jay. Good points.
I hit you back as well.

Jim
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Kahrs View Post
Depending on how uneven the floor is you might need to start with a leveling compound, then some kind of moisture/vapor seal... then install the subfloor. Since your leasing the space, maybe mount the parquet to some kind of removable subfloor so you can take it with you at some point down the road...

I've been in and even built a few rooms for people where we used 3/4" furniture grade plywood as the finish floor...with about 15-20 THICK coats of poly. Looks great. Sounds good. Wears really well too...
Old 17th August 2007
  #26
Lives for gear
 
Eganmedia's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by planet red View Post
How much does it cost to have proffesionally done?
It depends on the condition of the existing slab and the size. The floor needs to be scrubbed with some kind of cleaner- TSP I think- prior to the treatment. The materials aren't expensive at all. I remember the shipping cost almost as much as the product. After the stain has been applied you need to buy a stiff bristled buffing wheel and rent a buffer. Once it's done though, it's done. We sweep it often and mop it occasionally. That's the only maintenance we have had to do. I'd definitely do it again before spending big bucks on hardwood. I'd also do it before I'd put a synthetic floor like Pergo which, to me anyway, isn't a big improvement aesthically over linoleum. Soundwise, I don't know how the synthetics behave.

YMMV
Old 17th August 2007
  #27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan View Post
Yeah, I have the fake laminate flooring in a project studio. Gotta say it's a bad idea, and doesn't wear well.

Be good with wood.
hmmm. I have some laminate I got from Home Depot I've had on my floor in the live room for 5 years now, so far its been great
Old 20th August 2007
  #28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Kahrs View Post
Depending on how uneven the floor is you might need to start with a leveling compound, then some kind of moisture/vapor seal... then install the subfloor. Since your leasing the space, maybe mount the parquet to some kind of removable subfloor so you can take it with you at some point down the road...

I've been in and even built a few rooms for people where we used 3/4" furniture grade plywood as the finish floor...with about 15-20 THICK coats of poly. Looks great. Sounds good. Wears really well too...
Hey Jay, went to your website and it brought back pleasant memories. I had a 28 channel Trident series 24. Got a ton of mileage out of that console.

Also, some really nice rooms in the above posts. Among them...TTatman and eganmedia...

I am researching plywood or something similar for a possible subfloor.
Do you think that acoustic rubber matting over the concrete would be sufficient before layering hardwood on top or is it necessary to place a layer of plywood over the matting and the hardwood on top of the plywood? Remember...I'm leasing.
Old 22nd August 2007
  #29
Saw bamboo planks last night that were totally different from the ones in the editing room. It had a dull finish not shiney and there was a very slight wavey texture to the plank. Got my attention. Wondering if the guy was mistaken about the flooring in his building
Is it the bamboo planks you were referring to?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
wood lams are bad too because one gouge and your into the cheapo underlayment..i think instead of the 3/4 bruce oak i woud do maple or bamboo if i had another chance..much stronger
Old 22nd August 2007
  #30
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz View Post
Hey Jay, went to your website and it brought back pleasant memories. I had a 28 channel Trident series 24. Got a ton of mileage out of that console.
Yeah, I loved that Trident too... had it modded out... what a beast!

Quote:
I am researching plywood or something similar for a possible subfloor.
Do you think that acoustic rubber matting over the concrete would be sufficient before layering hardwood on top or is it necessary to place a layer of plywood over the matting and the hardwood on top of the plywood? Remember...I'm leasing.
Are there any known moisture problems? That would be one thing to ponder... some kind of concrete sealent would take care of that... but what I'd wonder about, is if a finish floor was mounted directly to the rubber it might be a little 'bouncy' without a subfloor.

It might be best to check with the company that makes the rubber backing & see what they recommend...

I assume you're not floating the floor? How about the walls?
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
jazzed / So much gear, so little time
15
hduncan / So much gear, so little time
7
drew / High end
47
Saloon / So much gear, so little time
11
SoundCampaign / So much gear, so little time
29

Forum Jump
Forum Jump