The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
Glass for vocal booth doors
Old 21st July 2007
  #1
Lives for gear
 

Glass for vocal booth doors

I'm building double doors for my vocal booth. Each one is approx 2 feet by 7 feet. I wanna put two panes of glass (spaced apart) in the top 1/4 of each door. Do you guys think plexiglass would work? Any drawbacks?

Are there different kinds of plexiglass?

Thanks in advance!
Old 21st July 2007
  #2
Gear Nut
 

Plexiglass is not as dense as glass, and therefore does not have the same degree of sound isolation. Better to use the heaviest glass you can find.
Old 21st July 2007
  #3
and angle the glass slightly.
Old 21st July 2007
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bitflipper View Post
Plexiglass is not as dense as glass, and therefore does not have the same degree of sound isolation. Better to use the heaviest glass you can find.
Crap... cuz I really wanted to make the doors as light as possible.... kind of a "working with what I got" situation. The doors are pretty heavy already.

And yes, I will definitely angle them! Thanks!
Old 21st July 2007
  #5
Gear Nut
 

Unfortunately, sound isolation is all about density of the materials, so soundproofed doors are necessarily heavy. Some go as far as to fill a hollow door with sand.

Maybe you could make the window smaller to reduce the weight?

The most important - and often overlooked - aspect is reducing transmission AROUND the glass rather than what goes through the glass. Use rubber gaskets, pack rigid fiberglass around it, and give it a good bead of latex caulk all around. Spacing and angling are not as important.

If possible, have the singing position facing the window so that the glass is on the dead side of a cardioid mic. Then you won't have to worry about reflections off the glass.

I wouldn't worry about angling the glass on the inner pane on the booth side. The advantage of angling is prevention of direct reflections back to the singer. The disadvantage in a door window is that angling reduces the internal volume between the panes and therefore decreases the transmission loss.

Since you're going to all the hassle and expense of constructing a booth, I'd recommend spending another 40 bucks on "The Master Handbook of Acoustics" by F. Alton Everest. A great reference for all aspects of acoustics, and there is a section devoted to studio windows.
Old 21st July 2007
  #6
The "door" to my vocal booth IS a big 32" x 82" piece of plexiglass. I drilled holes for bolting the hinges on, and a handle, and a whole row of cabinet magnets to keep it shut, closes with a real "thwack!"

I can't say it's a thousand percent isolating, but then I do recall my best friend-- he fell through a glass door on a porch once, cut up his arm, really impacted his whole life big-time, in a way that bouncing off of plexiglass wouldn't, really.

Not that I dwell on that a whole lot. Just glad I've got a plexiglass door.
Old 21st July 2007
  #7
Lives for gear
 
8th_note's Avatar
 

If you're trying to save weight then polycarbonate (Lexan) is a good choice. It has better sound insulation than a comparable thickness of glass but is about half the weight. It's going to be more than double the price of plexiglass and probably four times the price of glass but if weight is an important issue then it's your best choice without going to very expensive laminated acoustical glass.
Old 21st July 2007
  #8
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bitflipper View Post
Unfortunately, sound isolation is all about density of the materials, so soundproofed doors are necessarily heavy. Some go as far as to fill a hollow door with sand.

Maybe you could make the window smaller to reduce the weight?

The most important - and often overlooked - aspect is reducing transmission AROUND the glass rather than what goes through the glass. Use rubber gaskets, pack rigid fiberglass around it, and give it a good bead of latex caulk all around. Spacing and angling are not as important.

If possible, have the singing position facing the window so that the glass is on the dead side of a cardioid mic. Then you won't have to worry about reflections off the glass.

I wouldn't worry about angling the glass on the inner pane on the booth side. The advantage of angling is prevention of direct reflections back to the singer. The disadvantage in a door window is that angling reduces the internal volume between the panes and therefore decreases the transmission loss.

Since you're going to all the hassle and expense of constructing a booth, I'd recommend spending another 40 bucks on "The Master Handbook of Acoustics" by F. Alton Everest. A great reference for all aspects of acoustics, and there is a section devoted to studio windows.
Wow this is great stuff guys!

I'm a little confused as to how to "Use rubber gaskets, pack rigid fiberglass around it". I was just gonna frame around it and use caulking. How would I use rubber gaskets and fibre glass?

Thanks!
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump