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Is the Trident Fleximix 1974 pre's any good ??
Old 1st November 2002
  #1
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Is the Trident Fleximix 1974 pre's any good ??

Someone is selling 2 Trident Fleximix 1974 pre's and i was wondering if these are any good ??? what is the street value for them ?? thanks
Old 2nd November 2002
  #2
I'v moved this down to Jays forum as it it right up his ally!
Old 2nd November 2002
  #3
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hollywood_steve's Avatar
 

fleximix strips

If you've got a 16 channel Fleximix frame with 2 empty slots, those units could be worth maybe $100-$150ea. As "outboard" preamps, they are worth a LOT less, especially when you consider that you will spend more money building a custom rack enclosure, powering them up and wiring them than they would ever be worth when complete.

They might be a fun project and might provide a useful tone when complete; but do not look at them as investments - they ain't A-Range modules....

Also, you might want to confirm that "1974" dating. As far as |I know, the Fleximix didn't debut until several years later, '79 or '80. (unless you mean that the units carry a "1974" model number???)

steve
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Old 2nd November 2002
  #4
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
I'll agree with Steve's comments. Fleximix strips might sound great but they aren't in the same class as an A-range or an 80. Are they in a lunchbox with power supply or are they raw modules? What's the guy asking for them?
Old 31st October 2003
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
Neddy Seagoon's Avatar
 

I have a few raw Flexi strips and was wondering if anyone could recommend somebody in here LA/OC who could do a good and cheap (they are only Fleximix modules!) job of racking and powering a pair of them?

Cheers.

PS FWIW The Fleximix came out in 1979 and was designed by John Oram which, no doubt, explains the really nice EQ (amazingly nice for a live board) and hohum pres.
Old 1st November 2003
  #6
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Wiggy Neve Slut's Avatar
 

Are you sure the flx mix where designed in 79?.. cos i was under the impressionm that this was when the Trimix was introduced which was the scaled down version of the series 80 that was portable and the desk came together in 2 halves that were joined together via a berndi type BFO cable. I remeber the dudes @ VKing used to go on about these sorts of desks being used on early bowie stuff which was early 70's?

Hmm i dont know.. its all got me confused?
Cheers
Wiggy
Old 1st November 2003
  #7
Gear Head
 
droog's Avatar
 

Here's some trident info. The Fleximix was originally developed as a live console for Queen. There's a Tape Op issue from the end of 2001 with an interview with Malcolm Toft.

Trident's range over the years:

A Range - First console made in 1970, split design.

B Range - Second split design console, 1973.

Fleximix - Live sound console, launched 1979.

TSM - First Quad console, split design,1979.

Series 80 - First introduced in 1980, this fully modular console, very ruggedly built for use in fully professional studios, is well known for its very high quality of sound. In 1982 Trident was awarded a contract to supply Swedish Local Radio with 24 Series 80 consoles over a one year period for use in mobile broadcast vehicles.

Series 80B & 80C - During 1983, Trident introduced new versions of the Series 80 range designated the Series 80B and, in 1987, Series 80C.

Trimix - Split design, rear panel patching, mobile, no stand. Launched 1981.

S70 - Hybrid Trimix, on board patchbay, studio version, on stand. Launched 1983.

TIL - First "Trident In Line" console. Launched 1984.

Series 65 - A low cost fully modular and extremely versatile multi-track recording console. Launched 1984.

Series 75 - A larger counterpart of the S65. It incorporates larger meters and an integral patchfield. Launched 1985.

Series 16/24 - A hybrid between the S65 and S75. Utilises the S75 modules in a S65 frame, providing the S75 but in a smaller physical size and without the patchbay. Particularly useful for home recording studios. Launched 1989.

Di-An - Owing to the frequent clashes of artists' schedules versus available studio time, recording engineers and record producers were for many years seeking ways to memorise the settings of all of the recording process in one session. The Di-An was the answer to this requirement, launched 1986. By providing digital control of analogue audio, Trident is able to provide the all important manipulation of audio via the digital domain i.e. storage, retrieval, reset etc., of all of the console's functions. All information can be stored and retrieved at a later date by means of 3.5 floppy disks.

Vector 432 - Launched on 22nd September l989 was the second 'In-Line' console to be designed by Trident. Already in use with Broadcast customers within the U.S.A, Japan and Europe, the Vector has also been sold to music and video post studios as well as custom versions fitted with LCRS panning for the film industry. This multi purpose console features 32 multitrack busses, 4 stereo busses and a choice of 4 modules including a stereo input with both stereo mic and line inputs.

Series 90 - This console was first shown on the 3rd June 1992 at the APRS Exhibition, Olympia. The Ninety is offered as standard with a choice of either Trident's dual VCA fader automation or our Moving fader/VCA fader automation. Both systems include 12 automated switches per channel and machine control. The Ninety is a 24 bus console available in either 40 or 56 channel frame sizes.

Ventura 85 - Launched at the San Francisco AES in November 1994, this console was developed to fill the niche below the Ninety series and is available in 32,40 and 48 input versions with an optional automation package.
Old 2nd November 2003
  #8
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
It's worth noting that there are a few holes in that history. Not huge ones though. The 80C didn't arrive until '89, not '87. Also, at some point the series 65 started using the same modules as the 24. At that point the 65 went from being an 8 buss board to a 16, possibly picking up the name Series 16. But, I've NEVER seen any schematics or anything that actually refer to a Series 16. My desk says Series 65 and has 16 busses but the switches for all 24 busses.

They're also leaving out the VFM desks which were IIRC, smaller 16 channel portable boards in the early '80s. I've never used one but most of the reports I've heard say to get a 1604 and just skip the VFM.

Also the Series 70 was pretty much a 16 buss Series 80. I've heard conflicting reports on whether or not the channel strips or any other parts can be swapped.
Old 2nd November 2003
  #9
Gear Head
 
droog's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally posted by Jay Kahrs
They're also leaving out the VFM desks which were IIRC, smaller 16 channel portable boards in the early '80s. I've never used one but most of the reports I've heard say to get a 1604 and just skip the VFM.
Good stuff Jay

A mate of mine has picked up a VFM and it's almost impossible to find any info on it. Pulled it apart and there's nothing to it inside ; 3 op amps , 4 transistors , a buch of caps and resistors in each of the channels. Oh yeah , the decal proclaims that it comes from Trident Audio Developments "Consumer Product Division"
Old 2nd November 2003
  #10
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A mate of mine has picked up a VFM and it's almost impossible to find any info on it. Pulled it apart and there's nothing to it inside ; 3 op amps , 4 transistors , a buch of caps and resistors in each of the channels. Oh yeah , the decal proclaims that it comes from Trident Audio Developments "Consumer Product Division"

Well, I just unloaded mine for double what I paid 4 years ago (and I've gotten 6 calls since then!), so I won't defend it too strongly. I got rid of it because I'm 100% location these days and the VFM is only portable if you are a Gorilla. But the " nothing to it inside ; 3 op amps , 4 transistors , a buch of caps and resistors in each of the channels." is exactly why I liked my VFM so much. It was simple, bulletproof, sounded OK and was possibly the easiest board to service EVER. Big fat modular channel strips with very little inside - a service tech's dream! When they were going for $500 or $600, I think that they were the greatest deal around, but now that every kid with a DAW has been sold on the concept that he MUST sum through an analog board or he just won't get laid ever again, the VFM is suddenly a $1k+ board again. I only wish I had held out for more money......
Old 2nd November 2003
  #11
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Most of the reports I've heard about the VFM put it in the sucky catagory. One person who dispises Wackie stuff said he'd rather be seen mixing on a 1604. I'm not sure I can say anything to that. The only time I've actually seen one it was a huge desk. Maybe portable by 1980's standards but today? No freakin' way.
Old 2nd November 2003
  #12
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by Neddy Seagoon
I have a few raw Flexi strips and was wondering if anyone could recommend somebody in here LA/OC who could do a good and cheap (they are only Fleximix modules!) job of racking and powering a pair of them?
Three letters.

DIY

They aren't worth sinking a lot of money into for a nice racking job. I'd hunt around for the pin out, build a little lunchbox and get an off the shelf power supply.
Old 2nd November 2003
  #13
Gear Maniac
 
Neddy Seagoon's Avatar
 

You may well be right Jay. 2 strips will take at least a three space 19" rack though. I'll have to dig around for the schematics. Even if they sound only OK it's got to be worth some effort just because they look so damn cool. One thing my studio really lacks is green machined aluminum nobs!
Old 3rd November 2003
  #14
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Give Tri-Tech Audio and MTA a shout. They might have schmatics around for a nominal price. Also, I think Subspace has a Fleximix desk, you might wanna drop him a line.
Old 3rd November 2003
  #15
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subspace's Avatar
No Fleximix, mine's a Trimix.
The first chronology posted (pasted from http://tryaudio.co.uk I think) was right about the Series 70's origin. It consisted of Trimix modules mounted in a larger fixed format frame, with 8 additional busses on a ribbon cable. So modules can be swapped between the Trimix and the Series 70, but they don't fit the 80.
Trident scaled down the Series 80 module, removing the second frequency selection from the high and low shelves, the stereo send, reduced the 24 busses to 8 and incorporated the fader into the module to make a "portable" version, the Trimix. People requested a version with more busses for fixed installations and so they came up with the Series 70 in '83, a scaled-up Trimix with integrated patchbay and producer's desk.
Ok, I'll stop now...
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