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Acceptable analog white noise?
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Acceptable analog white noise?

Hey guys. Question. I worked mostly in the box for yrs and now I’ve phased in about 20 rack spaces of high end eq’s and compressors etc. I’ve noticed white noise when I have a hardware insert plugin on the channel with a piece of hardware connected. It’s only really audible when my monitors are cranked. I know the analog world has a higher noise floor.
When I open my mastering template and put my Heritage audio bus compressor before Ozone the analyzer on ozone’s eq shows a fair amount of white noise on the bottom of the analyzer. I’ve tried everything. Different plugs, isolation transformers, moving my rack gear around etc. And it’s still there and I have read other people having this problem. Is this just the “tape hiss” (figuratively speaking) that comes with using analog hardware? How much is too much where it could be another issue?
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Gear Maniac
 

Gain staging is real yo
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Kronos147's Avatar
It's really easy to compress in more 'white' noise, for sure.

Go to tape, add the tape hiss, then it's all 'natural'.

Old 1 week ago
  #4
Lives for gear
 
andychamp's Avatar
Yeah, noise is a reality of hardware.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanBarley View Post
Gain staging is real yo
I don’t think gain staging is the issue with my mastering chain I only have one track open with two plugins. There isn’t really much to gain stage.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Lives for gear
 
vernier's Avatar
There shouldn't be any noise. Try removing everything, one thing at a time, to find the culprit.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgueritual View Post
When I open my mastering template and put my Heritage audio bus compressor before Ozone the analyzer on ozone’s eq shows a fair amount of white noise on the bottom of the analyzer.
Quote:
It’s only really audible when my monitors are cranked.
don't crank your monitors, then

seriously, if you have to look at an analyzer to believe there is a problem, how bad can the problem be? You wanted analog? You got analog.

Remember too, that the analyzers scale may be compressed visually to fit on the screen. Things at the "bottom" of the analyzer scale may be exaggerated because otherwise it would be less than a pixel.


Quote:
How much is too much where it could be another issue?
I would say too much is where you can hear it while the music is playing. If it actually affects your mix. If you notice in context not just in "testing". If you really have 'high-end' gear and you really are properly gain-staging it, the noise should be negligible. After all, this is how people made records for half a century. And they all added actual tape hiss from the tape itself. Your recording medium is the DAW, not adding anything of its own.

Perhaps having started ITB, your ears are too 'modern' to tolerate what should be a minuscule amount of hiss. As vernier said turn off one thing at a time, if the noise suddenly gets dramatically lower, there you go.
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
don't crank your monitors, then

seriously, if you have to look at an analyzer to believe there is a problem, how bad can the problem be? You wanted analog? You got analog.

Remember too, that the analyzers scale may be compressed visually to fit on the screen. Things at the "bottom" of the analyzer scale may be exaggerated because otherwise it would be less than a pixel.




I would say too much is where you can hear it while the music is playing. If it actually affects your mix. If you notice in context not just in "testing". If you really have 'high-end' gear and you really are properly gain-staging it, the noise should be negligible. After all, this is how people made records for half a century. And they all added actual tape hiss from the tape itself. Your recording medium is the DAW, not adding anything of its own.

Perhaps having started ITB, your ears are too 'modern' to tolerate what should be a minuscule amount of hiss. As vernier said turn off one thing at a time, if the noise suddenly gets dramatically lower, there you go.
I can agree with you on this. You are correct. It was just my insert plugin return was up too high. I sorted it out. Thx.
Old 1 week ago
  #9
Lives for gear
 
BOWIE's Avatar
I've found that what's "acceptable" varies GREATLY from person to person. Some people I know are obsessed with fussing over the noise floor, even if it's not realistically affecting their work. Others have set-ups as hissy as 4-track tape but they don't seem to notice or care.
Old 1 week ago
  #10
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Mix something and then listen to it on a home stereo and a car stereo. When you're in "hyperaware" mode of the studio, things that sometimes seem MASSIVE seem like nothing once you take them to the real world.
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